300,000 U.S. troops are suffering from major depression or post traumatic stress

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Principessa, Apr 17, 2008.

  1. Principessa

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    300,000 vets have mental problem, 320,000 had brain injuries

    By Pauline Jelinek
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    7:46 a.m. April 17, 2008

    WASHINGTON – Some 300,000 U.S. troops are suffering from major depression or post traumatic stress from serving in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and 320,000 received brain injuries, a new study estimates. Only about half have sought treatment, said the study released Thursday by the RAND Corporation.

    “There is a major health crisis facing those men and women who have served our nation in Iraq and Afghanistan,” said Terri Tanielian, the project's co-leader and a researcher at the nonprofit RAND.

    “Unless they receive appropriate and effective care for these mental health conditions, there will be long-term consequences for them and for the nation,” she said in an interview with The Associated Press.

    The 500-page study is the first large-scale, private assessment of its kind – including a survey of 1,965 service members across the country, from all branches of the armed forces and including those still in the military as well veterans who have left the services.

    Its results appear consistent with a number of mental health reports from within the government, though the Defense Department has not released the number of people it has diagnosed or who are being treated for mental problems. The Department of Veterans Affairs said this month that its records show about 120,000 who served in the two wars and are no longer in the military have been diagnosed with mental health problems. Of the 120,000, approximately 60,000 are suffering from PTSD, the VA said.

    Veterans Affairs is responsible for care of service members after they have left the service, while the Defense Department covers active duty and reservist needs. The lack of information from the Pentagon was one motivation for the RAND study, Tanielian said.

    The most prominent and detailed military study on mental health that is released is the Army's survey of soldiers at the warfront. Officials said last month that it's most recent one, done last fall, found 18.2 percent of soldiers suffered a mental health problem such as depression, anxiety or acute stress in 2007 compared with 20.5 percent the previous year.

    The Rand study, completed in January, put the percentage of PTSD and depression at 18.5 percent, calculating that approximately 300,000 current and former service members were suffering from those problems at the time of its survey, which was completed in January.

    The figure is based on Pentagon data showing over 1.6 million military personnel have deployed to the conflicts since the war in Afghanistan began in late 2001.

    RAND researchers also found:
    • About 19 percent – or some 320,000 services members – reported that they experienced a possible traumatic brain injury while deployed. In wars where blasts from roadside bombs are prevalent, the injuries can range from mild concussions to severe head wounds.
    • About 7 percent reported both a probable brain injury and current PTSD or major depression.
    • Only 43 percent reported ever being evaluated by a physician for their head injuries.
    • Only 53 percent of service members with PTSD or depression sought help over the past year.
    • They gave various reasons for not getting help, including that they worried about the side effects of medication; believe family and friends could help them with the problem, or that they feared seeking care might damage their careers.
    • Rates of PTSD and major depression were highest among women and reservists.
    The report is titled “Invisible Wounds of War: Psychological and Cognitive Injuries, Their Consequences, and Services to Assist Recovery.” It was sponsored by a grant from the California Community Foundation and done by 25 researchers from RAND Health and the RAND National Security Research Division, which also has done does work under contracts with the Pentagon and other defense agencies as well as allied foreign governments and foundations.
     
  2. frizzle

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    No offence but you have to expect that kind of thing when joining the army. If you don't, you're naive.
     
  3. Principessa

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    I may be naive; but I don't think this should be expected when you join the Army.

    Years ago PTSD was called "shell shocked". It is somewhat common in war zones. The worst part is the lack of appropriate treatment available to these men and women. They served their country and when they come home, their country needs to serve them. :cool: It shouldn't matter if their injuries are visible or invisible.
     
  4. frizzle

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    Of course, proper treatment should be avaliable and nothing less then 100% should be given for our men and women; but you do have to accept the fact that joining the army isn't a walk in the park.
     
  5. faceking

    faceking Well-Known Member

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    This is so overblown, and statistically awry it's sick...

    not to mention that vets are demographically above their peers on violent crimes... something you don't see/hear much of....
     
  6. faceking

    faceking Well-Known Member

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    and nowadays... I have to imagine ... semi-frequent headaches are equal to shellshock... your type of rhetoric undermines many doing a fantastic job in rebuilding and securing that nation, which you only know of negative vs positive reinforcements.. I think you, nor your "resources" can count the number of Kurdish ppl, schools, clergy, that have re-emerged, much less survied, much less female/women's rights in Iraq. , as your rhetoric is somewhat seditious..... given how much you hate the US... and spare us all the "criticism is patriotic"

    400 million were shell shocked on 9/11... not to pull that out... but lest you forget .... a second or repeated attack would leave your fragile pathetic psyche in SHAMBLES much less the American economy... and to discount what these men/women are doing to your fragile and "freedom of speech" rhetoric is a shame. Do them a favor and don't cash your unemployment check. (guessing... correctly)

    NJQT... do you even REALIZE that if we told a slew of fundamentlist Muslims of what you do and believe in... that your head would be cut... with a blunt blade in seconds... at least the Catholics you scorn would berate you with rhetoric... the enemies of your lifestyle want you DEAD... period, end of story... and I invite you to find otherwise,.............otherwise shut your f'ing trap... and quit f'int discouting what these far braver men/women than your loathesom internet posting phat ass is doing, or lack thereof... for the common American good....
     
  7. Phil Ayesho

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    Faceking

    you need to stop eating the Red acid...


    THe Kurds did FINE with the no fly zone Established by Bush 1 and enforced by Clinton...

    There was no need to invade to secure Kurdish re-emergence.

    Further... over 100,000 Iraqis, who had nothing to do with 9/11, have been killed...
    We HAVE NOT rebuilt shit... Halliburton spends its time trying to get oil out of the country using mercenaries paid 20 times what a US soldier earns... and without the pesky Military code of justice, nor any other law, to cramp their style.

    Our soldiers are given the shit tasks that get them targeted.

    NO freedoms are being secured... Trillions of dollars of YOUR future income are being diverted into the pockets of some corporate defense contractors who have their dicks in Bush's mouth.


    The only thing Osama and his ilk want is US OUT.

    No country , anywhere, ever in history has ever fallen to terrorism.
    Not one.

    Terrorism is a pest, like mosquitoes... they do little real damage... make a lot of noise... and kill a tiny fraction of the number of folks killed every year by SWIMMING.


    Our government has made the actions of a few thousand assholes the entire focus of national policy and spending for the most powerful nation on earth... AND the excuse for killing hundreds of thousands of innocents....

    So they can give contracts to their buddies.


    Anyone making such ridiculous claims about how Muslims want our way of life to END as justification for discarding our rights, for torture and for war is a lilly livered, chicken shit crybaby... who ought to try growing a spine and growing a pair...

    Stop basing your political views on FEAR.

    Cowboy up and have the courage to live free.
     
  8. snoozan

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    The Army does a good job of promoting things like college degrees and downplaying the chance of us actually getting into a war. My brother is National Guard and has spent more time in Iraq and overseas than many people who are active duty military. As well, these men in Iraq are serving 2, 3 and more tours of longer durations than we ever had. We don't have the size Army we need to do the job the President wants us to and there's no talk of a draft because that's when the American public would stop accepting this war. The burden of this is bring foisted upon troops who are spread so thin that it's no wonder they are suffering.

    My brother is considered 100% disabled from his service in Iraq and yet had to fight to not go on another tour when his unit was called up again. Mind you, he is not active duty Army and he is also unable to get a job in the civilian world because of the injuries he sustained in Iraq. On top of physical and neurological problems, he's suffering from psychiatric problems. He switched to a civilian doctor because the VA was not treating him effectively.

    Are you really surprised that someone who has spent months to years in a warzone would be more violent than someone who hasn't? This is an argument in favor of stopping this war, not against.

    It may seem overblown to you, but tell me, how much contact have you had with returning vets?

    By the way, this is 100% not the case, and if you knew anything about how the VA operates and how hard it is for soldiers to seek (because of stigma) or receive proper treatment. I've actually seen how this process works. You're talking out of your asshole.
     
  9. naughty

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    Workin' up a good pot of mad!

    Snoozan,

    I am so sorry to hear about your brother. I do wish him the best. It really is a shame. I remember just a few months before the beginning of the war they were actually thinking about closing down Walter Reed. Not only are they now overcrowded and buying everything in the area they had to reopen Kimbrough at Ft. Meade. The reason they had to reopen is not a good thing but it is good to have both facilities back in action.
     
  10. JustAsking

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    This is the usual faceking logic. Translated briefly it says:

    "Because there is a threat of terrorism against the USA, it is ok that some 350,000+ soldiers have had their lives altered perhaps permanently, and it is ok that they are not getting care."

    As a corrollary, to the faceking logic:

    "Anyone who criticizes even the smallest aspect of the fighting of the war in Iraq (no matter how justified) , must hate America."

    Oh, and I agree with Phil. More people have been killed in swimming accidents than terrorism wordwide.

    And snoozan, I am so sorry to hear about your brother. I don't know anyone who has returned from Iraq, but I do remember the friends and neighbors who returned from Viet Nam with that haunted hollow-eyed look.
     
  11. uncut1234

    uncut1234 New Member

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    but who cares, we got saddam !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! mission accomplished!!!!!... right?


    fuckin failure.... so sad
     
  12. naughty

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    Workin' up a good pot of mad!
    This thread makes me think about that scene from Patton where the "great general" drives the shell shocked soldier up out of his bed and lambasts him. I wanted to step through the screen and knock his block off. :mad:
     
  13. D_Fiona_Farvel

    D_Fiona_Farvel Account Disabled

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    Someone very close to me just returned from Iraq about two months ago, and there's always that adjustment period, but this time he is very withdrawn. Fortunately, he does have access to outside services and we won't have to "rely", if you can call it that, on the VA system.

    The information in this articles is not surprising. Vets have never been treated correctly. I try not to use absolutes, but it is true. My Father's older brother was a WWII vet who lost coverage, even though he had lingering issues, when treated using outside medical insurance. Another family member suffered Agent Orange exposure and they didn't get extended coverage until like a decade later. My Dad lost his coverage. Stepfather lost his coverage a few years ago (yet still receives his VA card, flag and all). Cousin tried to get leave due to a medical condition and they wouldn't allow her extended leave. Etc. etc. etc. just too many things to mention. I feel because so many lack family in the military that they are completely unaware of the realities of serving.

    I mean, yes service has given my family great opportunities, but that has come at extreme cost as well. Both physically and mentally... I won't get into the details, but it has been tough on everyone. So yeah, support the troops, absolutely. But realize the VA system is a failure.

    Eta: In closing, ITA with Snoozan!
     
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