a book I love

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by conchis, Aug 24, 2007.

  1. conchis

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    3,208
    Albums:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1,331
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Roma
    Hotel New Hampshire, john irving
     
  2. conchis

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    3,208
    Albums:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1,331
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Roma
    come on guys/girls, books... you know, those things made of paper and full of small black printed letters... :)
     
  3. ManiacalMadMan

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2006
    Messages:
    1,107
    Likes Received:
    7
    Gender:
    Male
    Never heard of such nonsense
     
  4. SpoiledPrincess

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Messages:
    8,167
    Likes Received:
    29
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    england
    What's a book again?

    The Canterbury Tales - to me the rather spiteful sense of humour of Chaucer is there on every page, if you can get to grips with middle English the language is charming.

    The Last Gladiator - Richard Ben Sapir Starts off with the rather unlikely event of a gladiator being reanimated, but it's really an examination of ancient morals against modern ones.

    The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant - Stephen Donaldson, a fantasy novel but a rather more grown up one than LOTR, the entire thing is two trilogies so it's something I could really get my teeth into.
     
  5. D_Sherian_LaNeige

    D_Sherian_LaNeige Account Disabled

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2007
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    2
    I love The Hotel New Hampshire too!

    Other favourites include:

    The God of Small Things - Arundhati Roy
    The Bell Jar - Sylvia Plath
    Miss Smilla's Feeling for Snow - Peter Hoeg
    The 'His Dark Materials' series - Phillip Pullman

    ...I also love a good Pratchett, but I think he's gone off the boil a bit in recent years.
     
  6. braumeister

    braumeister New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2007
    Messages:
    116
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    exiled to New England
    Job: A Comedy of Justice - Robert Heinlein
    The Moon is a Harsh Mistress - Robert Heinlein
    Isaac Asimov's Robot, Empire, and Foundation series
     
  7. DC_DEEP

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2005
    Messages:
    9,029
    Likes Received:
    12
    Siddhartha - Hermann Hesse
     
  8. B_Think_Kink

    B_Think_Kink New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2006
    Messages:
    10,742
    Likes Received:
    17
    Gender:
    Female
    Long Hard Road out of Hell - Marilyn Manson
     
  9. ManlyBanisters

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2007
    Messages:
    12,807
    Likes Received:
    8
    Good call, a must read, if you ask me - even for those who don't normally enjoy fantasy.

    Catch 22 - Heller
    The Sound and the Fury - Faulkner
    The Marriages Between Zones Three, Four, and Five - Lessing
    Written on the Body - Winterson
    Against a Dark Background - Banks
     
  10. DC_DEEP

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2005
    Messages:
    9,029
    Likes Received:
    12
    Ah, it's been a while since I read those! I went through all six books just wanting to slap some sense into the protagonist!
     
  11. huw ginnit

    huw ginnit New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    Messages:
    387
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    North West
    Love biographies personally, reading and learning all in one, that said I list reading as a hobby. I do; honestly, I have three books on the go at once.

    I highly recommend, "Infinite Variety" about the Marchesa Casati-by Ryersson and Yaccarino; haute camp and so interesting, and presently enjoying "Misia" about Misia Sert, by Gold and Fizdale about the greatest artistic muse of the twentieth century.

    Pullman's "Dark materials" books engaged me on a fiction level, but left me feeling annoyed- can't wait for the film tho, I hope they don't gut it.
     
  12. B_NineInchCock_160IQ

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Messages:
    6,378
    Likes Received:
    11
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    where the sun never sets
    Ender's Game, Orson Scott Card, terrific author, though his ramblings on his website have become increasingly insane as time passes.
    Fight Club, Chuck Palahniuk, though the movie is just as good if not better

    a couple of my favorites
     
  13. B_ScaredLittleBoy

    B_ScaredLittleBoy New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2007
    Messages:
    3,337
    Likes Received:
    8
    The Adventures of Don Quixote. I have both parts one and two.

    "What the devil vengeance can we take," answered Sancho, "if they are more than twenty, and we no more than two, or, indeed, perhaps not more than one and a half?"
    "I count for a hundred," replied Don Quixote.

    Love that 16th Century humour :cool:
     
  14. whatireallywant

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2007
    Messages:
    3,587
    Likes Received:
    7
    Gender:
    Female
    I have more of favorite authors than favorite books, but here goes some of them:

    Foundation series by Isaac Asimov

    Earth's Children series by Jean Auel (first 3 books, and ESPECIALLY "The Valley of Horses" because it contains the verbalization of my ultimate sexual fantasy! :smile: )

    Valdemar and Bedlam's Bard series by Mercedes Lackey

    The Book of Words trilogy by J.V. Jones

    Deryni series by Katherine Kurtz

    Anita Blake series by Laurell K. Hamilton

    Many more...especially science fiction and fantasy stuff.
     
  15. ZOS23xy

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2007
    Messages:
    5,073
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    directly above the center of the earth
    The Thomas Covenant series? With a bad person called Lord Foul, the most suble name I ever heard? And a leper for a hero with a rigid Catholic sense of guilt?

    And lines like: "His mind bifurcated".

    And the word "clench" on every other page?

    Good for laughs. Sorry.
     
  16. ZOS23xy

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2007
    Messages:
    5,073
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    directly above the center of the earth
    Orson Scott Card is homophobic, and uses his Mormon relgion as an excuse to lean into it hard.
     
  17. Eva

    Eva New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    428
    Likes Received:
    9
    Maribou Stork Nightmares by Irvine Welsh
     
  18. jack99821

    jack99821 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2006
    Messages:
    202
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    2
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged (Characters. Characters characters characters)

    Stephen King's The Stand and Lisey's Story (his character development is phenomenal in these, no matter how strange the plot can seem at times)

    Mark Haddon's the curious incident of the dog in the night-time (knocked me off my feet the first time I read it. I was expecting a light book for a rainy day)

    George Orwell's Animal Farm (the concept is brilliant, the execution of the concept even more so)

    Dante's Divine Comedy (my favorite thing to read, really. I'm slightly obsessed with it and actually own it in 3 translations)
     
  19. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2004
    Messages:
    10,576
    Likes Received:
    25
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Warwick, NY, USA
    Dracula - Bram Stoker

    Better than any movie version I've ever seen. It use of diary entries to narrate events is a brilliant way to build suspense. The book is rife with symbolism and, I think, is highly relevant in these times.

    The Red Book of Westmarch - J.R.R. Tolkien

    Vastly more than the cliche choice of the generally illiterate, Tolkien's romance is a powerful tale of myth illustrating the importance of doing what is right when all hope is lost. While modern scholars scoff at the complete lack of irony, I find their complaints deficient because their assertion implies that sincerity is of no value. These books are something less than myth and something more than a morality play. I have yet to meet someone who isn't a better person for reading them.

    Bonjour Tristesse - Francoise Sagan

    The woman had an extraordinary talent for creating the lushest metaphors. If read only for this, the book would be satisfying. Sagan illuminates adolescent life better than Catcher In the Rye ever did. Bonjour Tristesse is not as forced, nor as naive.

    The Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald

    I love this because it's filled with characters based upon people I've actually known. The Fitzgeralds spent a lot of time here in Warwick with the Fowlers attending the most outrageous parties. Some of the people who were alive at the time were (or are) my oldest relatives and the events in The Great Gatsby are all essentially true with only slight changes to places and people. In this, it's a great book made greater for me by my unique insights into the events and characters.

    All Quiet on the Western Front - by Erich Maria Remarque

    The greatest pacifist book ever written. The writing is brilliant. German translates to English very well and this book is spare, concise, yet the characters stand out like flesh and blood. It's a book apparently never read by the current occupant of the White House.

    History of the Peloponnesian War - by Thucydides

    I love reading the ancient historians and Thucydides is my favorite. There's a wide misconception that any author worthy of becoming a marble bust must be dry and boring yet that isn't true at all. Thucydides' humorous asides and writing style are engaging, giving the reader a real sense of events playing out with tension. It almost has a plot. Wonderful!

    The Republic - Plato with Socrates

    The first book that taught me to think! I love it dearly. Without it I doubt I would be able to see what so many others cannot. I count philosophy as the single most valuable course of study in school as it illuminates every other subject and teaches us how to think critically.

    Prolegomena To Any Future Metaphysics - Immanuel Kant

    Took everything I knew from Plato and stood it on its head. Taught me reality is subjective.

    Gardener's Art Through the Ages - Richard Tansey et al.

    Art history and philosophy go hand-in-hand. Each radically changes our perceptions of the world around us and brings us understanding of why and how things the way they are. My goal in education was to learn to see and think as objectively as possible and nothing illuminates art like this bible of art.
     
  20. hotbtminla

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2007
    Messages:
    1,226
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    12
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    The Little Prince - Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Les grandes personnes ne comprennent jamais rien toutes seules, et c'est fatigant, pour les enfants, de toujours et toujous leur donner des explications."
     
Draft saved Draft deleted