A great voice has fallen silent

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Osiris, Sep 6, 2007.

  1. Osiris

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    I remember as a young man seeing Pavarotti perform at the Lincoln Center for a Gala my mother attended in her official capacity. Until that time, I only loved the voices of Leontyne Price, Beverly Sills, and Dame Kiri Te Kanawa. I remember this being the first aria of Pavoratti's that moved me to my very soul.

    This clip is mainly for the music and the voice, not the content...

    Pavarotti sings Nessun Dorma (Martin Scorsese Film Tribute)

    Sleep peacefully Luciano. Heaven's choir just gained a wonderful voice.
     
  2. D_Charlie Peen

    D_Charlie Peen New Member

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    I don't mean to sound cocky but it's Pavarotti, not Pavoratti :)
     
  3. Osiris

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    Thank you for the correction. Sometimes the hands and the head disconnect while typing.

    And as for sounding cocky? Well, you are SimonPenisLover. :biggrin1:
     
  4. Not_Punny

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    Thanks Osiris -- Drifterwood already has a thread on this, but us Americans can have one too!

    I saw Pavarotti perform with the three tenors in Portland OR, about ten or twelve years ago. It was amazing!!

    The man did so much for charity and was one of the few to ever go beyond "opera snobbery" to bring opera to the people.

    I am so sad.
     
  5. naughty

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    yes, he made the music accessible to everyone. I was about to put a thread up this morning but I saw Drifterwood had already done it but I suppose there can not be enough tributes. I put a tribute to both he and Dr D.James Kennedy on my Myspace page. I thought is only fitting to send the two old boys off with their signature themes. For Dr. Kennedy (Pastor of Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church) I chose John Rutter's setting of the "Gaelic Blessing" sung by St Pauls Cathedral choir. For Maestro Pavarotti, I of course used a clip of him being joined by his two faithful compadres Maestro Domingo and Maestro Carreras singing "Nessum Dorma". May both of these great men rest in peace.
     
  6. B_denis11

    B_denis11 New Member

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    Some of us DO have special memories of Pavarotti. Sadly, his health had deteriorated in his final years. His last performances were done sitting down; years of obesity had taken a toll on his knees. The two weeks prior to his death were spent in a Modena, Italy, hospital, suffering from a high fever. The tenor's last public appearances were prior to his surgery for pancreatic cancer in New York a year ago.

    Just days before his death, Pavarotti was honored by the Italian government, becoming the first-ever recipient of the Excellence in Italian Culture Award. The announcement of the award was made just days ago by the Italian Culture Ministry. No date for the planned ceremony had been made before Pavarotti's death.
    As his condition deteriorated, several international music organizations began to issue statements about the role Pavarotti played in modern-day music. The world's best-known opera house, La Scala (in Milan) issued a statement saying it was joining with the opera house in Modena (Pavarotti's hometown) in setting up an international singing contest that would be dedicated to the Italian singer. One of the singer's first major world-class-level opera performances was in La Scala, 40 years ago.
    He was not a big hit at first. Though many reveled at his clear, sweet tones, others complained that he often seemed labored in his singing, as if it was more difficult than it should have been. In many ways, he was perceived as the polar opposite of singer Perry Como -- who seemed to sing without singing. But it was Pavarotti's huge number of recordings of nearly every popular opera and his willingness to tour, nearly to the point of exhaustion, that endeared him to a generation.
    He loved sports and often sang at international soccer events. His award-winning voice was only matched by his infectious smile.
    But, he eventually found a niche, singing many of the most familiar middle-period Verdi and Puccini roles, including the Duke in "Rigoletto," Gustavo in "Un Ballo in Maschera" and the role of Alfred in "La Traviata." Surely, it was his rendition of the soaring "Nessun Dorma" from "Turandot" than made him a cult legend. It became his signature song at most of the concerts he gave in the second half of his career.
    The Italian tenor will always be remembered for his robust singing style and equally robust body. He seemed to play the part of hard-living opera star as if he had been assigned the role by Central Casting.
    Some criticized him for becoming too commercial, particularly in joining with Placido Domingo and Jose Carreras in the popular series of "Three Tenor" concerts. But, he was quick to remind his critics that one of the most commercial tenors of them all was Enrico Caruso ... and Caruso has always had a unique place in modern history.
    At the time of his death, Pavarotti was planning a huge recording project for next year ... if his health improved. He was preparing to record a major collection of religious music. He did not live to see that dream realized.
    But, for many of us, it doesn't matter. He didn't need to record anything additional of a spiritual nature to prove he could do non-secular music and do it exceedingly well. He had already shown his talents in the realm of religious music by one particular performance ... his poignant singing of "Ave, Maria" during a visit by the late Pope John-Paul II to Chicago in 1979. The pope sat nearly entranced by the singer's touching rendition of the song, while an international audience watched and listened on live television. Pavarotti later told an interviewer that he was scared to death and the event was the highlight of his career.
    There was a magic in that moment. He was at his prime ... and so was John-Paul. If Pavarotti did nothing else in his career but perform THAT song at THAT time in THAT place, he would still be remembered as one of the greatest ever. Luciano Pavarotti was 71.
     
  7. SpoiledPrincess

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    A beautiful bright voice, sad to see him go.
     
  8. B_Just Joe

    B_Just Joe New Member

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    unfortunately i never got to see him perform but his music is what originally made me want to see opera. never have i heard such a voice that brought tears to my eye and joy to my soul at the same time.

    he will be missed terribly.
     
  9. Osiris

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    Yeah, I saw Drifterwoods just after I hit the Submit Post button.
     
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