After the Election?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Drifterwood, Oct 31, 2008.

  1. Drifterwood

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    I have always been impressed that whilst the US has quite bitter elections, when the ballots are in people pull together and get on with it.

    If Obama is elected, it will be quite a radical step in the political history of the US. Do you think, given that national unity is needed now as much as ever, that his opponents will respect his Presidency for the good of the Country?
     
  2. Principessa

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    We do? :confused: If you mean we go back to work, school, family, etc. and try to put Washington, DC matters out of our heads whilst we try to eke out an existence; then yes, we do pull together and get on with it. :cool:

    Good question, I believe that some will and some won't. I predict there will be a few subversive, splinter groups that will continue to work against him.
     
  3. vince

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    I suppose it depends on Obama actions. Some of his opponents will give him a chance, but I think many will never respect his Presidency. It's the nature of politics today. The left/right divide seems to become more entrenched every year and people seem less willing to listen to other points of view.

    Opinion in the media is more available than ever before and it is human nature seek listen those that re-enforce their own bias. It's easier to let others do the thinking for you and just good along with your herd.

    It will be the same for McCain, should he win.
     
  4. kalipygian

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    I think Obama has the ability to lessen divisions, which is the reverse of the incumbent.

    I see some otherwise very conservative black people working on his campaign here. By an unscientific online poll, 89% of gay people in Sarah's home state are voting for him.
     
    #4 kalipygian, Oct 31, 2008
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2008
  5. Drifterwood

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    I would tend to agree, as an outsider. The thing about centrist concensus though is that whilst say 80% of us accept the democratic mandate and can live with it, the poles become isolated from the mainstream. I just wonder where the far right will go without the Republicans in the White House.
     
  6. Principessa

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    Well, if history is any indicator they will retreat to their heavily armed bunkers. Er, uhm I mean cabins in Montana. :tongue:
     
  7. kalipygian

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    Or here. The late founder of the AIP reportedly had his place surrounded with barbed wire and machine gun emplacements.

    Edit: it would solve a couple of problems if they could be induced to go to Baltistan/Waziristan.
     
    #7 kalipygian, Oct 31, 2008
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2008
  8. B_VinylBoy

    B_VinylBoy New Member

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    Considering the responses and ugly truths that have been emerging from people over these last few weeks, I actually fear that civil unity in our nation is going to take a while. Sometimes I read comments on this forum and think that they wished the civil rights movements never happened. Naturally I want to be optimistic, however, this racial & class warfare that seemed to have peaked over these last few weeks bothers me.

    In regards to Obama, there's going to be some tension if he wins. I doubt that any of his first orders of business will go through without a problem because the remaining Republicans in office are poised to vote against him just out of spite. I'm already prepared for our next president to take his entire term of 8 years (if he gets it) to turn the country around. He's going to need it, because the current GOP is making it a point to fuck it up ad much as they can for whoever is in charge. So yes, that will probably mean Obama (if he wins) won't be able to come through with every single campaign promise. But at least there could be someone at the controls who will actually listen to reason instead of just acting on impulse and holy intentions.
     
  9. invisibleman

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    I hope that Obama does get a chance to be President. Globally, there are countries who have had presidents of color. What would it look like if America didn't EVEN vote for a rational and intelligent person of color (for EVEN one term) as President of United States of America? Out of the whole entire history of US Presidential elections not ONE person of color has become a US President.

    I think that after the elections are over. I am going to do what I usually do. Live. Move on. And watch what happens.

    Whoever you vote for will inherit the Mission (un-)Accomplished and a financially damaged country.
     
    #9 invisibleman, Oct 31, 2008
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2008
  10. invisibleman

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    I have met a few African-Americans who support McCain. I don't EVEN understand that. I don't understand any black person who will vote for McCain/Palin.

    At the recent rally here in my local, Palin had Gretchen Wilson sing "REDNECK WOMAN" at her rally. How do you justify that? Sarah Palin is not redneck...she is from Alaska. That is like calling Whoopi Goldberg (which is NOT her real name BTW) Jewish.
     
  11. B_VinylBoy

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    invisibleman: It's natural for me to be optimistic because I do want to try and see the good in people. Although I'm also a skeptic, which makes me proceed with caution especially when there's enough things to worry about. I decided a long time ago to support Obama if Hillary lost the nomination. And although I still wish Clinton was on this ticket, I know voting for McCain/Palin for any reason is just asking for a colossal failure.

    Although I can understand where you're coming from, it doesn't surprise me that there's a few out there. Being in New York and originally from Massachusetts, two very liberal states to begin with, the overall consensus of Black/African-American people would never consider voting for McCain. That's based more on the surroundings I've grew up in than any statistical data. But there has to be a few wealthy African-Americans who are also caught up in the stories regarding taxes and worry that Obama is going to take away money from them. I DO agree when you say you don't understand it, though. Even if you're financially better off now than 8 years ago, if you ever grew up in a struggling or poor household (as many people people do in this country), how on Earth can you relate to those who always had and will continue to do so? Unless it's some kind of weird envy, which is an entirely different topic.

    Hehehehehe. I honestly can't think of a comment for this. And not many things make me speechless on this board. :biggrin:
     
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