Am I Disqualified?

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Hryblkone, Jul 8, 2007.

  1. Hryblkone

    Hryblkone New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2005
    Messages:
    167
    Likes Received:
    2
    Yesterday I had an interview at BMG Columbia House for a Creative Coordinator position. The interview went very well and I had a very good feeling that I was the right fit for the job. The interviewer was the manager I would be working for and seemed like someone I wouldn't mind working with. He told me I would be receiving a call from him later in the following week for a second interview with a two of his associates. After I walked out of the building I realized I was supposed to hand over my completed application to the interviewer. Realizing my gaffe I decided to send my completed application by mail to the interviewer. This morning after checking my email account I received a response auto-generated by the HR department that said this:

    Thanks so much for coming in to interview for the Creative Coordinator position at
    Direct Group North America. Since only so much can be learned from a resume, the
    manager greatly enjoyed meeting with you to discuss your career goals.

    Unfortunately there is no suitable position for you here at this time. If something
    more suitable opens up, we will be happy to consider you again.

    Thank you very much for your interest in our company, and best of luck in your job
    search.

    I don't mean to sound thick but does this mean that I am no longer in the running for said position just because I forgot to give this application when he already had a copy of my resume handy? Even though I brought it in completed as directed by his secretary what would the purpose have been other than my past earnings and references? Does this mean my well-intentioned submission will be overlooked? Do all corporations do this? If so I might as well give up looking for work altogether.
     
  2. Hatched69

    Hatched69 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2006
    Messages:
    763
    Albums:
    2
    Likes Received:
    13
    Gender:
    Male


    I doubt your application would have made a difference. The HR dept. likely already had someone in mind for the job, but had to open the position to the public in order to "play by the rules". I've been there myself a few times. It's a dirty game. You might try stopping back in the office and "play dumb" (read: "Oh, I didn't get the message") and see if they've made a decision yet, maybe you'd have another go. I landed a lucrative deal using that tactic. Just a thought....
     
  3. Pumblechook

    Pumblechook New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2004
    Messages:
    340
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    From the sounds of the bold print, it seems as if they went based off of your interview and your resume/application combined. Sure, this may be what they want you to think vs. what they actually think too. That is the thing with employer/employee relationships -- it's all based off of dishonesty. An employee has the right to quit for no reason at any time and the employer has the same right to fire (or not hire in your case) for any lawful reason at any time. So, my advice is to not overthink it (I tend to do this, so I know a little bit about how annoying it can be) and move on to the next thing. This one appears to be a lost cause.. for some reason... but either way the outcome remains.
     
  4. Pumblechook

    Pumblechook New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2004
    Messages:
    340
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Haha, best point ever. That is true in 100% of jobs. Basically if you're applying for something and you haven't already been told you are being hired and they are interviewing just because "it's legal stuff," you aren't getting the job. It's always good to know that any job posting you see (especially the ones taking only 1 spot to fill) aren't worth applying for. There are a few out there though that give you a 2.9% chance of making it... so that's why you press on.
     
  5. Principessa

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2006
    Messages:
    19,494
    Likes Received:
    28
    Gender:
    Female
     
  6. snoozan

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Messages:
    3,568
    Likes Received:
    4
    i have to say, you are lucky you got anything back from them in terms of a rejection. most times you'll get interviewed, they will tell you about a second interview or a call back but nothing really specific. in the meantime, you spend the next week or two on edge hoping they call you back for the mythical second interview that never existed in the first place. however, sometimes there is really a second interview or a call back, so when you hear that, it's not just a euphemism for, "go away, you're not hired."

    job searches really suck. i wish there was a lot more forthrightness in the process.
     
  7. Pumblechook

    Pumblechook New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2004
    Messages:
    340
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    That's a good point. The fact that you interviewed at all is actually a great sign. I have an engineer friend who just graduated from college and is more than qualified compared to other graduates, but still had a lot of trouble finding a job. He kept getting called to interviews, and second rounds, and getting turned down. On about the 6th shot, he got taken into an unlikely great summer job which will lead into his master's next, so it worked out. Persistance counts.
     
  8. Hryblkone

    Hryblkone New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2005
    Messages:
    167
    Likes Received:
    2
    Thank you for all your posts. They are much appreciated. I really wish there was more honesty as well. Rarely do I ever find positions where I feel like I'm doing something worthwhile. I certainly don't have the tolerance for retail anymore and I really want to find relevant work. What was scary was the man who interviewed me confided that he would have to lay-off 26 people from his department in the coming 2 months. Why he told me this I do not know. I admit I'm coming back into the workforce after recovering from a toxic position where I was treated like shit by my supervisors and employees only to later be fired for taking my lunch break when I was suppose to. The end result landed me on public assistance while I waited to get my unemployment benefits restored. Unable to pay rent, I lost my apartment and wound up being depressed for over 9 months. On the other hand it did give me some time to explore my opportunities as an actor. A year ago I wouldn't have even dreamt of working in productions alongside such talented and notable people. It was a year I allowed myself to follow my passion. Now I'm looking to bring in some serious paper to assist the household while taking additional courses. As an actor I can deal with insincerity in the entertainment biz but when it comes to a real job where I can make some good money consistantly and build my porfolio while improving business I just don't like to be jerked around. Maybe I should just stick to acting and go back to working as an escort at the risk of losing my bf? It may be risky but it will feed the two of us and I wouldn't feel like a burden to him anymore.
     
  9. b.c.

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2005
    Messages:
    9,302
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    1,685
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    at home
    Hope you don't take this the wrong way or think I'm making fun of your situation, but the question I'd be inclined to ask you (based on the info above) is did you disqualify yourself?

    First of all, I noted that you have concerns about honesty and integrity. That's wonderful. Unfortunately it has little place in seeking a job. I'm not necessarily telling you to lie about your job history. I'm saying there are things that need not be told (to a prospective employer) and ways to put a positive spin on what you do say.

    For example, hopefully you didn't tell the interviewer you were fired for going to lunch when you were supposed to. If you must admit to being fired pretend you understand why ("I was in a growing period, I understand the job was not just right for me and I've learned from those errors.") Generally, never talk down a previous job or former employee, even if you hated their guts. It'll only reflect badly on you.

    Secondly, NEVER tell a prospective employer you're looking for something to pay the bills while you work on another career. They ALL want to hear you intend to devote your entire heart and soul to their job even if you intend on doing nothing of the kind.

    Those periods when you were on unemployment and assistance... don't mention any of that. If asked, explain that time as a period when you were actively involved in ("something") even if it was giving care to or providing assistance for someone else.

    After the interview is done, ask for the job right then and there. ("Well how soon can I start?" "Shall I report tomorrow?") If the answer is yes, you're in. If they say they need to interview more candidates, forget it.

    Good luck.
     
  10. SomeGuyOverThere

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2004
    Messages:
    1,496
    Likes Received:
    5
    Gender:
    Male
    I dunno, there are different types of employers and people who interview you. Personally I go down the "brutally and utterly honest" approach because if this person is going to be my boss, I have to know that they're somebody I won't mind taking orders from. If they've got their head up their arse and are only looking for people who'd sell their soul to work there, then they're the type of person I'd hate working in the type of company I can't stand.

    When I go into the interview I am allways honest to the person, I'm above board and tell them what I'm thinking and why I'm applying for that job with brutal honesty, because in my mind, if I have to lie my ass off to get the job, it's probably something I wouldn't be very good at and/or wouldnt enjoy.

    My sheer honesty meant I actually turned down a job a couple of weeks ago, but I did it in such an honest and charming way that the interviewer tried to get a place for me doing something I'd be better at, and promised me (verbally and in writing) I'll be top of the list next year if I apply again.

    You are right with certain things though, like you said, you have to put a positive spin on being fired, and don't badmouth places you've worked, and you do have to talk up why you're gonig for the job and the positive aspects of your application, but don't over do it, be honest and don't make stuff up.

    In the end, I actually count on my honesty and it netted me a job this summer that I'm really enjoying doing with a boss who is more like a friend. I think the average person sitting in the interview chair is more interested in knowing the real reason why you want that job and if you're the kind of person they can work with rather than the "this has been my life's dream!" crap, and if that's what they want to hear, then they have their head up their arse and would be a bitch to work for.

    That's my perspective on the issue anyway, and as I said It got me a great job that I'm loving doing.

    ---

    As to the original poster, you are lucky to even get a response, that probably means they were pretty impressed by you, impress them more by responding to the email asking how you could improve your application next time - that shows that you are open to criticism and eager to learn, two hugely desireable properties that may well get you a job with them in the future.

    The tone of it leads me to suspect however, that this was basically a position they were giving to somebody who was already doing the job. I've seen it before, the company is only allowed a limited number of internal transfers per year, so this job they probably had to advertise by law, but they had already promised the position to somebody within the company.

    Sometimes however, you judt really have to wonder why they didn't hire you. A friend of mine went to an interview where he knew more about the job than the interviewer, had already done similar work for over a year previously, knew the guy he would be working with and was friends with his would-be boss, and yet they turned him down. Definatly a "WTF?" one.
     
  11. b.c.

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2005
    Messages:
    9,302
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    1,685
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    at home
    Good to hear you've been fortunate in that respect. I think though that more often than not, the person interviewing you will not be the person to whom you'll be reporting to.

    Regardless, I think there is a rational and logical difference between being "brutally honest" and putting a positive spin on what needs to be known.

    The rationale behind this is is not to "sell your soul" but to sell yourself in the job market, in the best light possible. And the older one gets the more one learns to balance "principles" (such as "brutal honesty") with the need to feed one's family.

    Certainly you wouldn't say to a potential employer "I want the job but I only plan on working for you for a year" or "I told my last boss to kiss my ass because I couldn't stand the ground he walked on." There are things that are best left unsaid, I think.
     
  12. Hryblkone

    Hryblkone New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2005
    Messages:
    167
    Likes Received:
    2

    b.c.:

    Come on, I'm not that naive. What I did mention to the interviewer is I spent the past year taking care of family business. That's the least I mentioned. In truth, he barely asked me any questions. It seemed to be just an informational interview about the position. If I have honesty and integrity issues it's because I don't like the ideas of someone saying they are considering me for another interview only to reject my candidacy. Furthermore, I only mentioned all that earlier information to this forum to put things in perspective for those of you who did not know. I was in financial ruin and close to considering suicide. Had all of this not happened to me in the year before I wouldn't care either way if I got the job.

    Someguyoverthere:

    And what makes you think I will ever express interest in employment at BMG in the future? I already implied that I was eager to learn in my cover letter to the manager. Truthfully, this really fucked up my self-esteem and makes me regret taking the time interviewing for this position. The duties and responsibilities described were things I had done in the past position when I wasn't dealing with office politics and bullshit among management. Simply put, I wasn't being considered as a candidate even though the manager wanted to have a second interview.
     
  13. b.c.

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2005
    Messages:
    9,302
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    1,685
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    at home
    Cool...but hang in there, dude, and keep trying. Something will come your way. If I had a dime for every job I didn't get...

    Here's a story from one of my early job searches. It was back when BellSouth was beginning to hire more minorities, only they wanted all of us out on telephone poles and hooking up service. Silly me. I had the audacity to apply for an office job (Customer Service. There weren't any of us in there back then).

    I already had my degree but nevertheless they could hardly contain the snicker when I told them I was interested. "Well, you'd have to pass a brief written test and take a typing test as well," they said. Only, when I passed all of them they weren't quite so giddy.

    So what'd the fuckers pull? After handing me off to one or two "higher-ups", they finally said they believed I was "overqualified for the job" and wouldn't be happy there.

    In hindsight, they probably did me a fuckin favor, because (moral of the story) sometimes things work out for the better. :wink:
     
Draft saved Draft deleted