Anarchy

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Axcess, Sep 10, 2008.

  1. Axcess

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    I don't believe in the stablished order . I don't believe in politics , I don't believe in the organized religion . I don't believe in society as it is organized . After reading about Anarchism It feels so similar to my way of thinking even long before reading about this term . What is your guys take about Anachism ? Let's discuss Anarchy.
     
    #1 Axcess, Sep 10, 2008
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2008
  2. psidom

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  3. Axcess

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    Forgive my ignorance but what is dadaist ?:confused::smile:
     
  4. psidom

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    it was an abstract art movement that was about
    chaos...it was anti-art art.

    they hit on alot of politics and was also an anarchist type group.
    they were banned by hitler as nonsense.
    which it was....that was the point,kinda like "wabi-sabi" in japanese art.
     
  5. Axcess

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    Thanks man I will research about this movement . Very few people are anarchists so I suspected that this thread wouldn't be popular . I want to start a depth discussion if people bring some opinions on the table.
     
  6. psidom

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    well i think alot of people think Anarchy is about violence.
    which it isn't...just some are violent as with anything.

    i have met violent hippies.

    anarchy is about freedom.
    true freedom and self-management,
    nature will take care of itself if it is allowed to coexist
    and is not disturbed by instigating forces like
    the government,propaganda,media,

    look at what hitler did to get people all ready to hate
    the jews,with his characters in comics...or how he
    would use post card ads with the german soldiers wives getting stolen by american soldiers
    to create a "stir" which worked but how much was genuine?

    this is what government usually leads to...cheap shallow greed.
    anarchy is about coexistence.
    just my idea of what anrachy is...in a small nutshell.
     
  7. D_Fiona_Farvel

    D_Fiona_Farvel Account Disabled

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    Anarchy, in the political sense, is nothing more than the absence of government.
    We experience it periodically, during national emergencies, civil war, and through isolation. Generally, nothing occurs as groups generally figures out their own, social hierarchy anyway.

    I lean toward Primitivism and Jeffersonian agrarianism... I just never got into Bakunin. :shrug:
     
  8. B_Hickboy

    B_Hickboy New Member

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    That twinge in your intestines
    I am an anti-geist,
    I am an an-ar-chist.
    Don't know if it's funny,
    But I'm gonna say it.
    I wanna get banned,
    Fuck my hand.

    'Cuz IIIIIIIII wanna beeeeeeeee-uh!
    Jaunet's enemy!...

    There's more, but I'm in the studio recording it... :biggrin:
     
  9. stratedude

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    I have done a lot of thinking about anarchy, and I have deduced that pure Anarchy can ONLY be temporary. Assuming we are talking about the complete absense of law...think about it - even the most rudimentary, thrown together street gangs have some sort of hierarchy, and usually some sort of code. The Native Americans were considered savage hunter-gatherers but they had tribes and rules among themselves.

    If you don't like the current establishment, I can respect that, but I don't think that a pure anarchy can exist permanently without the human race going extinct.
     
  10. D_Davy_Downspout

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    What particular flavor of Anarchism do you espouse?
     
  11. Nrets

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    Order is inherant to primates. That said...governments as they exist today did not exist 10000 years ago...or even 20 years ago, in some regards.

    People hunted and gathered in tribes.
    Or they pillaged and plundered in gangs...

    The point is that humanity existed without government for eons.

    Life expectancy was fairly long.

    People were fit, and probably happy.

    Food tastes better when its had to get.

    Fucking is probably more intense when it's all you got.

    Lowered life expectancies around 1900 were a result of overcrowding thanks to civilization.

    Life expectancy is longer now with research and technology and all that shit.

    And hey I love it, I guess...but in the end it's not natural.

    The earth is on life support in this system...and eventually the machines are going to run out of juice whether or not someone unplugs it.
     
  12. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    This is the most famous piece of Dada art. It is Marcel Duchamp's Fountain.

    Dada was anti-art. It developed as a reaction to the outbreak of World War I as a rejection of the bourgeois culture that Dada artists believed were responsible for the war. It was a way to say, "Fuck you," to the establishment that was sending young men to die in the thousands for no apparent purpose. Dada pieces were not meant to be esthetically pleasing or even carefully constructed. While we today may understand that not all art is meant to be beautiful or well-crafted, in those days it was a revolutionary idea. Naturally there was a huge rebellion against the Dadaists. Galleries refused to show them, dealers refused to represent them. Any time that happens in art, BUY IT! because sure as shit a generation later, it'll be in museums and the names will be in every art textbook published.

    Dada was not a futile gesture. It opened the doors to Abstract Expressionism (Klee, Pollock, Rothko), Surrealism (Gaudi, Dali, Miro, Arp), performance art (Beuys, Kaprow), and pretty much anything that the Nazis later condemned as, "degenerate." As a movement it didn't last long, but it did have enormous impact.
     
  13. Gl3nn

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    Thank you for saving me the typing, Jason.


    Although I must say that I don't really see the fountain as art, but of course... art is always subjective.
     
  14. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    This is the problem of placing Dada pieces in museums and art books. Duchamp basically did exactly what you see. He bought a urinal, signed it with a fake name, plopped it on a plinth, and submitted it under the fake name, "R. Mutt," you can see on the side. The original was lost but Duchamp made copies.

    Precisely!

    You would not have thought that before Fountain was exhibited. Really, you wouldn't. Everybody thought art was objective and that's what you would have been taught in school. With one stroke, Duchamp made art subjective as we understand it in the modern sense. That's how radical this one piece was when it was introduced to the world. No shit (and fortunately, no pee either!). Fountain has been hailed as the most influential artwork of the 20th century because it precisely brought the entire question of, "What is art?," to the minds of artists, critics, and eventually, everyone in the western world.

    Here's a good critique of what the impact of Fountain has been:
    Duchamp adamantly asserted that he wanted to "de-deify" the artist. The readymades provide a way around inflexible either-or aesthetic propositions. They represent a Copernican shift in art. Fountain is what's called an "acheropoietoi," [sic] an image not shaped by the hands of an artist.

    Fountain brings us into contact with an original that is still an original but that also exists in an altered philosophical and metaphysical state. It is a manifestation of the Kantian sublime: A work of art that transcends a form but that is also intelligible, an object that strikes down an idea while allowing it to spring up stronger. - The Village Voice
    A bit heady, but there it is. Another good article is here, from The Telegraph.
     
    #14 jason_els, Sep 11, 2008
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2008
  15. Gl3nn

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    It's good to know the history of art. I doubt it if I even would have heard of dadaïsm if I didn't have Art History in school.

    When I was in Paris, I liked the Louvre and Musée d'Orsay more than Centre Pompidou. But that doesn't mean that modern art isn't important.

    Art is more than just art. It indicates different periods in history and has more effect on our daily life than we realise.
     
  16. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    Did you have art history in secondary school or university?
     
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