Anybody know about UK money

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by D_Fluoridia Bidet, Mar 12, 2007.

  1. D_Fluoridia Bidet

    D_Fluoridia Bidet New Member

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    I got this coin from the UK. it says on it
    Gra Britt OMN Rex Fid DEF IND IMP Georgivs V DEI
    ONE PENNY 1928 is it worth anything today?
     
  2. DaveyR

    DaveyR Retired Moderator
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    It is a pre-decimal Penny. It is not worth anything to be honest with you. Most folks have lots of the pre-decimal( pre 1971) pennies and half pennies. The oldest one I have is 1802 and that is not really worth anything either.

    Just for your info UK money was made up as follows prior to 1971

    240 Pennies in the Pound
    12 Pennies in a shilling
    20 shillings in a pound

    There were many other coins including the threepenny bit, sixpence half-panny and farthing.
     
  3. Yorkie

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    Value depends on condition and only a serious collector could really say how much it's worth.
    I wouldn't order the Ferrari and luxury yacht just yet though! :smile:
     
  4. B_ScaredLittleBoy

    B_ScaredLittleBoy New Member

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    I've got a 1 Shilling coin from 1950. Seen them sell for £1/$0.50-60 on ebay.
    I'll keep hold of mine. You get a lot of them mixed in with 10p's.
     
  5. SpoiledPrincess

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    It's worth about 1p :)
     
  6. ghostwheel77

    ghostwheel77 New Member

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    Arnt they all almost now EURO's?
     
  7. kalipygian

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    GEORGIUS QUINTUS DEI GRATIA BRITTANIARUM OMNIBUS REX FIDAE DEFENSOR ET INDIAE IMPERATOR. George the fifth, by the grace of god, king of all britian, defendor of the faith, and imperor of india. The figure of Brittania on the reverse is from an ancient Roman coin design.

    I miss having coinage that was interesting to look at and handle, and had some artistic merit.
     
  8. DaveyR

    DaveyR Retired Moderator
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    No the UK did not move to Euros

    What did you mean by all almost? What were you referring to?
     
  9. D_Fluoridia Bidet

    D_Fluoridia Bidet New Member

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    man i thought this was shit was worth something
     
  10. DaveyR

    DaveyR Retired Moderator
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    Fraid not sorry
     
  11. D_alex8

    D_alex8 Member

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    It was a year which saw a very high mintage of pennies as well. I'd actually be surprised if you could get anyone to take it off your hands for more than US$0.50

    ---> http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=140093993549

    Even in Uncirculated condition, you'd only be talking about US$25.00 in this case, and yours is almost certainly not in that condition (since it displays wear and evidence of handling, etc.).
     
  12. Love-it

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    The coin is worth more in scrap metal value than monetary value. Copper is way up.
     
  13. SpoiledPrincess

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    Before decimalisation British currency was 12 pennies = 1 shilling, 20 shillings = 1 pound, there was such a huge amount of pennies in circulation very few of them are worth much, practically every house in Britain has a bagful of old coinage somewhere. The coins that existed were halfpennies (although these were withdrawn early 60's), pennies, threepenny bits, sixpenny bits, shillings, two shillings, half a crown (two shillings and sixpence) anything above that was a note.
     
  14. quercusone

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    Oh Wow! You won the lottery!!! That coin entitles you to one free ride on the Quercusone Dick-a-whirl!
     
  15. DaveyR

    DaveyR Retired Moderator
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    Now that is something that money cannot buy :tongue:
     
  16. dong20

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    Actually they were once silver, later Bronze then copper plate steel (except 1999 which was bronze). But yes, copper is way up!!

    Not quite....Don't forget :

    Farthing (1/4 penny until 1960),
    Double Florin (then 4 shillings - Some Edward VIII variants are said to be worth up £1000!!!)
    Crown (5 shillings - though largely ceremonal and I think withdrawn prior to WWII),
    Half Sovereign (10 shillings - rare gold coin, withdrawn),
    Sovereign (Rare £1 gold coin) and,
    Guinea (Rare £1/1s shilling gold coin).

    It's odd that the Royal Mint doesn't mention these and others back to George III but they most definitely existed and some are still legal tender!

    Also, I think the venerable groat (4 pence, a short Victorian hackney fare) deserves an honourable mention...:smile:

    I believe the Sovereign was withdrawn soon after 1921, the guinea about 1817 when it was replaced by the Sovereign but the name is still alive and well in some circles. I believe the Sovereign was withdrawn soon after 1921, though it keeps resurfacing!

    The last pre decimal half-penny was issued in 1967 and was withdrawn July 1969. The post decimal half-penny remained legal tender until 1984. Notes started from 10s (50p).
     
  17. titan1968

    titan1968 Active Member

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    My God, that was some system! What a memory you have, dong20!
    Thanks for the explanation.

    Crissy, don't thow your coin out just yet; it might be worth something someday. Good luck!

     
  18. kalipygian

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    And Maundy money, silver 1, 2, 3, & 4d. From George VI to Victoria, gold 2 & 5 sovereign, George III 3s silver, 1/4, 1/3, & 1/2 guinea, George II 2 & 5 guineas.
    The silver penny (denarius) was origonally the only denomination and metal minted by the Anglo Saxon Kinglets. For some reason, in 1797 they minted bronze 2d, it was 2 3/4" across and about 1/4" thick, 'cartwheels'. Guess they had a problem with an surplus of copper. Used to have one.
     
  19. D_alex8

    D_alex8 Member

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    * cartwheels were actually copper coins, not bronze ones.

    The 'cartwheels' were produced in an effort to cut down on forgeries. Created using Matthew Boulton's steam presses in Birmingham, they were intended to be almost impossible for fakers to reproduce. The high intrinsic value of the material (one ounce of copper for the penny, and two ounces of copper for the 2d) was also intended to dissuade forgers, since the market value of the copper one would need to use was approximately equivalent to the face value of each coin already, i.e. they would need to spend the face value of coins they were faking in order to produce them!

    The 2d cartwheels were actually produced for two years, 1797 and 1798, but the coins produced in the latter year were created using the same moulds, meaning that they too are dated 1797!

    The coins were intended to replace silver twopences, which were produced as standard circulating coins from 1660 through to the 1790s, and which had been faked heavily during the first half of George III's reign.

    However, what actually happened was that the cartwheels proved unpopular with the public due to their extreme weight, while at the same time, the use of silver threepences increased dramatically, effectively rendering the need for a 2d coin obsolete. Indeed, there was a hiatus in the production of any 2d coins whatsoever from 1800 through to 1816, with the silver twopennies struck from 1817 onwards being used primarily as presentation or maundy pieces, and no longer considered as standard circulating coins.
     
  20. dong20

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    Can't take all the credit. I remembered the coins, not all of them from personal use:eek: but the dates I had to confirm.

    I probably have a few old coins knocking around somwhere but they won't be in mint condition that's for sure.
     
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