Apostrophe S

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by ManlyBanisters, Jun 23, 2008.

  1. ManlyBanisters

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2007
    Messages:
    12,807
    Likes Received:
    8
    I'm sorry but this needs doing. Again.

    's is NEVER plural. NEVER NEVER NEVER.

    Bicycles = more than one bicycle.

    Bicycle's = something belonging to a bicycle.

    Bicycles' = something(s) belonging to more than one bicycle.

    Exmaples:
    I own two bicycles.
    My bicycle's bell goes 'ding'.
    Our bicycles' bells go 'ding'.
     
  2. tiggerpoo

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2006
    Messages:
    1,468
    Likes Received:
    28
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Columbia, Missouri, US
    Dear MB, True. But what prompted your post?
     
  3. Pendlum

    Verified Gold Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Messages:
    2,151
    Albums:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gender:
    Male
    Verified:
    Photo
    Sometimes the wires just get crossed! I sometimes use 'd on something that has a past tense version. Of course 'd isn't exactly proper, but it is good for fake words. Cheney'd looks better than Cheneyed in my opinion. Cheney'd would of course be being shot by your 'friend' while hunting!
     
  4. ManlyBanisters

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2007
    Messages:
    12,807
    Likes Received:
    8
    I didn't want to have a go at a user in a thread for getting it wrong - that would have been OT and singling one person out for a mistake that I see many people making.

    I thought posting a separate thread and having it out there might just cause it to sink in for a few people who didn't know they were making a mistake, but without actually picking on any individual.
     
  5. Catchoftheday

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2007
    Messages:
    18,300
    Likes Received:
    127
    Location:
    On the other side
    How many bikes does one pig need and who has bikes with bells on these days, you'd be better getting a horn.
     
  6. ManlyBanisters

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2007
    Messages:
    12,807
    Likes Received:
    8
    Well yeah - but that's shows applied intelligence, plus it is intentional. Also 'd is a vallid form, allbeit archaic - 'd used to be the form for any past tense ending where the writer wanted to convey that it should be pronounced without the 'e'. so here, in To his Coy Mistress, Marvell used 'preserv'd' to let the reader know not to read it as pre-ser-vEd but as pre-servd:
    My echoing song; then worms shall try
    That long preserv'd virginity
     
  7. ManlyBanisters

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2007
    Messages:
    12,807
    Likes Received:
    8
    Don't you want to play with my ding-a-ling?
     
  8. Pendlum

    Verified Gold Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Messages:
    2,151
    Albums:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gender:
    Male
    Verified:
    Photo
    Yeah, but I'm saying that sometimes my fingers don't listen to the brain and then my eyes don't catch it. This is for me though, I guess some people really don't know how to use an apostrophe. To be fair I have a hard time remembering what exactly a semi-colon is used for in proper English. I think it has something to do with some sort of lists, but it is pretty much only used for smiley faces now. :tongue:
     
  9. Catchoftheday

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2007
    Messages:
    18,300
    Likes Received:
    127
    Location:
    On the other side
    Sounds like fun, wouldn't you like to know how much fun you can get from blowing a horn?
     
  10. ManlyBanisters

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2007
    Messages:
    12,807
    Likes Received:
    8
    This is about the best short summary I found with a quick search.

    The Semicolon

    You will usually use the semicolon to link independent clauses not joined by a co-ordinating conjunction. Semicolons should join only those independent clauses that are closely related in meaning.

    Abdominal exercises help prevent back pain; proper posture is also important.
    The auditors made six recommendations; however, only one has been adopted so far.
    Do not use a semicolon to link a dependent clause or a phrase to an independent clause.

    [WRONG] Although gaining and maintaining a high level of physical fitness takes a good deal of time; the effort pays off in the long run.
    Although gaining and maintaining a high level of physical fitness takes a good deal of time, the effort pays off in the long run.

    Generally, you should not place a semicolon before a co-ordinating conjunction that links two independent clauses. The only exception to this guideline is if the two independent clauses are very long and already contain a number of commas.

    [WRONG] The economy has been sluggish for four years now; but some signs of improvement are finally beginning to show.
    The economy has been sluggish for four years now, but some signs of improvement are finally beginning to show.

    It may be useful to remember that, for the most part, you should use a semicolon only where you could also use a period.

    There is one exception to this guideline. When punctuating a list or series of elements in which one or more of the elements contains an internal comma, you should use semicolons instead of commas to separate the elements from one another:

    Henry's mother believes three things: that every situation, no matter how grim, will be happily resolved; that no one knows more about human nature than she; and that Henry, who is thirty-five years old, will never be able to do his own laundry.

    http://www.arts.uottawa.ca/writcent/hypergrammar/semicoln.html
     
  11. Pendlum

    Verified Gold Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Messages:
    2,151
    Albums:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gender:
    Male
    Verified:
    Photo
    Thank you MB, thank you.
     
  12. mindseye

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2002
    Messages:
    5,685
    Likes Received:
    1
    Gender:
    Male
    Nitpick: 's forms the plural of single letters, numerals, and acronyms when s alone is ambiguous. For example, the sentence

    As are used three times in the word banana.

    is hard for a reader to parse correctly the first time, because the first word looks like "as". When written as

    A's are used three times in the word banana.

    the meaning is immediately understood. The sentence:

    You can't finish making this sign without us.

    is easy for a reader to parse correctly the first time, but no reader is likely to understand it as meaning

    You can't finish making this sign without u's.

    unless the apostrophe is used to indicate that the last word is a plural instead of a pronoun. At this point, I'll omit the joke about all the bs on my college transcript. ;)
     
  13. Catchoftheday

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2007
    Messages:
    18,300
    Likes Received:
    127
    Location:
    On the other side
    A's are used three times in the word banana.

    sorry this is silly the letter is used three times in the singular therefore the sentence should be :


    A is used three times in the word banana

    You can't finish making this sign without u's.

    this could probably be better written as;


    You can't finish the sign without using the letter u

    thus using the singular but possibly implying ppossible plural usage
     
  14. DC_DEEP

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2005
    Messages:
    9,029
    Likes Received:
    12
    You just love going on these little and rant's, don't you? Nothing stop's you from digging in on other's when they make mistake's. What give's you the right to have his's'y fit's whenever other member's mak'e m'i'sta'ke's?

    I think sometimes, some people feel a bit guilty for putting an "s" at the end of a word without an apostrophe, regardles's of needing to or not.

    Sign on the refrigerator at work some years back...

    "Please remove all your item's from the fridge on Friday. All remaining item's will be thrown away on Saturday."
     
  15. mindseye

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2002
    Messages:
    5,685
    Likes Received:
    1
    Gender:
    Male

    I'm not claiming that the sentences are well-written; all I'm claiming is that the sentences are correct with the apostrophe used to indicate a plural. When writing a transcript of spoken remarks (for example, in a legal proceeding), the transcriber doesn't have the liberty of rephrasing the sentences (which is what you've suggested), and has to transcribe what was actually said.
     
  16. ManlyBanisters

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2007
    Messages:
    12,807
    Likes Received:
    8
    I was kinda hoping no one was going to bring that up as it is just going to confuse the bollocks off the people I was aiming the OP at. I was even going to include the term 'full words' in the OP, but then I would have had to explain what I meant and pointed out the counter examples - leaving people going 'well look, there is a plural with an apostrophe'.

    Thanks, m - shoulda known I could count on you. :rolleyes:

    I agree with this - not so sure about the u's / u example though.

    Also, with numerics (60s verses 60's) there is nothing abreviated in 60s and therefore the apostrophe is unnecessary.

    Acronyms can be got around by using capitals - for example, here I use PMs for 'private messages' and PMS for 'pre-menstrual stress', there is no ambiguity.
     
    #16 ManlyBanisters, Jun 23, 2008
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2008
  17. ManlyBanisters

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2007
    Messages:
    12,807
    Likes Received:
    8
    I'll deal with you later, young man! :mad:

    I've seen everything from "Trespasser's will be prosecuted" to "Dog's must be kept on their lead's" to "Potato's" - although that could at least be argued to be accidentally representative of an abreviation! :rolleyes:
     
  18. vince

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2007
    Messages:
    14,785
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    539
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Asia
    I have the same problem. I don't know if it's dyslexia or what, but I can proof-read a post twice, think all is ok, and then as soon as I post it I see errors.


    Thanks. I have a question. Would the following be correct?-
    "The economy has been sluggish for four years now; some signs of improvement are finally beginning to show." The co-ordinating conjunction 'but' has been removed.

    I have avoided using semicolons in the past, maybe now I'll be more confident.​
     
  19. MASSIVEPKGO_CHUCK

    MASSIVEPKGO_CHUCK Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2003
    Messages:
    28,016
    Likes Received:
    726
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    the pain behind your eyes
    Forgive me for pointing out the obvious, but the apostrophe's value can be a possessive as well as a verb and shortening of words such as should not to shouldn't or cannot to can't without losing the contraction portion of it.
     
  20. Northland

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Messages:
    6,082
    Likes Received:
    4
    Furst awf eye are reeley uppsets that's yo iz's gotted moor then won buycyckle's.!?.!



    Second, and, much, more, important, is, what, you've, neglected, to, say,-that, it's, more, than, just, your, bicycle, which, goes, 'ding'.



    (and how are you with commas?)
     
Draft saved Draft deleted