Assisted Suicide - Could you?

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by D_Relentless Original, Sep 20, 2009.

  1. D_Relentless Original

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  2. lucky8

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  3. jason_els

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    Yes. It would have to be a really close friend or family member though. I don't think I could do it for a stranger.
     
  4. nudeyorker

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    I've never talked about this before, but I have done this. I think enough water has run under the bridge to break the silence. (It was for a very dear friend dying of Aids)
     
  5. Industrialsize

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    I used to work as a Nurse on an Oncology floor in a Major hospital in Boston. I can tell you that "assisted suicicide" goes on ALL the time in hospitals. Doctors would prescribe for terminal patients, a continuos infusion of Morphine with quite a WIDE range to be determined at the Nurse's discretion. After discussion between the Nurse, Patient, and their family it would be determined what the "plan" was. When the plan was"keep me comfortable, or I don't want to suffer" the Nurse had to make a decision. Increased doses of Morphine almost always by depressing the breathing reflex. Often times, doses of Morphine, sufficient to Keep a Patient comfortable were also doses that would be ultimately fatal. On the floor I worked, Nurses would call it, Dialing him home to Jesus". If that's not assisted suicide I don't know what else is.So I guess the answer to the question is "Yes, I could"........and my hope would be that someone would also do the same for me if I was the patient.
     
  6. Alaboner

    Alaboner New Member

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    No, I couldn't kill somebody.
    Especially someone close to me.
     
  7. Northland

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    Hard to say.

    What I can and will say is that I would not do it if it just seemed to be some nonsensical reason for checking out. Now, something like Alzheimers I could see a person wanting to check out before their entire life disappeared from them. Would I assist? I would need to wait until the situation came up before I would be able to give it an honest answer. Certain other debilitating illness might also garner an interest from me.

    Clearly in addition to the reason for a person wanting to end their being, it would depend on my level of emotional connection to them. The more I care about a person the more of a likeliehood that I'd give it strong consideration.
     
  8. DiscoBoy

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    Yes and I hope someone would do the same for me.
     
  9. MarkLondon

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    I think this is best handled by health professionals who are involved with those that care for the ill person (as it is in the majority of cases, I think). I would much rather sit with a loved one whose morphine is being dialed up than stick a plastic bag over their head to end their agony. And I'd hope for the same for myself.
     
  10. D_Relentless Original

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    My thoughts exactly DB. A few years ago, i worked in a Dementia/Alzheimers hospital, i was so traumatised, i remember discussing with my family that i would not/could not/want to live like that and they would have to help me.
     
  11. Industrialsize

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    Trust me, all the Nurses who worked with me felt like cases like these were almost "Solemn". Whatever that word might mean to you. We treated these patients with the utmost care and compassion. We didn't leave them alone in their rooms. We would talk softly to them. We'd bathe them, rub their shoulders etc. We tried to make their experience of "passing" as peaceful and comfortable as possible. I always felt that I was doing something very important.
     
  12. D_Chaumbrelayne_Copprehead

    D_Chaumbrelayne_Copprehead Account Disabled

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    I am a proud Oregonian from the only state in the US to legalize doctor-assisted suicide. We got to vote for it TWICE because the feds tried to take the right away from us.

    I would not want to do this for someone, but I could and would depending on the circumstances. I am very thankful that I have not been put in that position.
     
  13. B_Stronzo

    B_Stronzo New Member

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    .. in a heartbeat

    You were. And you have my respect.
     
  14. nudeyorker

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    This scenario is almost the same as my mothers passing. The word "Solemn" is certainly appropriate although in my case it was an unspoken complicity because the conversation was spoken in whispers and veiled innuendo between my mothers doctor and our family that all of us understood.
     
  15. D_Relentless Original

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    Thanks Indy, you all were, and a well written compassionate posting too.
     
  16. Bbucko

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    If I'd had the means I'd have done the same in at least three cases.
     
  17. midlifebear

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    Like krispdx noted, Oregon is the ONLY State in the USA where it is legal. But if you live in another state, you have to take up residence in Oregon, find a physician, and I think wait at least 6 months before outsiders can take advantage of the law. If you live in another State and help a friend with his or her request after watching them waste away to nothing and live in a state of constant pain, you'll be charged with murder if anyone finds out.

    Last time I was in Manhattan for more than two days was to help a friend I'd known since 1975 travel to Zurich where we lugged all of her medical records with us in her luggage and checked her into a hospice. A week later she painlessly "checked out." It was then I found out that I could be charged with her murder in New York and told never to talk about it. But screw that shit. Come and get me! These tend to be the issues 'Mericuhns like to waste their time on rather than death with dignity, making certain all citizens have equal access to health care, and working via diplomacy for peace when there's so much more money to be made by going to war. Yup, it gives the conservative "fringe" element an excuse to make up lies about grandma death squads and somehow link that to same sex marriage as a sign of the end of red/white/and blue society (hand over hearts) and how homosexuals "recruit" children which has something (I'm not certain what) to do with demonizing illegal Mexican and Central American workers. Have I got too far off subject? Well, while I'm at it I want to address the complaint that there are too many violins on TV. Personally, I don't see a problem with violins on TV, but the lunatic fringe does! People could do a lot worse than to learn to play the violin and even play it badly on TV. What's that? It's not violins, but violence? I don't care, violins are still important!
     
    #17 midlifebear, Sep 20, 2009
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2009
  18. jason_els

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    Did people ever do this sort of thing at home?

    I don't know how you managed. The oncology nurses who care for me at the infusion center are outstanding but it must be so emotionally draining that I worry about them. It takes an extremely special person to do this kind of work. :notworthy:
     
  19. justmeincal

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    Thanks for bringing up that SNL scene, it made me smile.

    On a more serious note, I would like to think I would help out a loved one if that is what they desired. And I hope they would do the same for me. But until you actually are faced with the situation I think Indy and a few others here know for sure.
     
  20. Industrialsize

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    It's done at home all the time, it requires a good hospice team and caretakers who are all on the same page as each other and the patient. I've never seen bravery before as strong, as in those I took care of who decided to take control of their situation and ask for help to do it in their own homes and beds.
     
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