Average College professor only makes around $61,000 but MD is proposing furloughs

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Rommette, Sep 3, 2009.

  1. Rommette

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    Ok....for a person with a Ph.D $61,000 (according to cnn money) isn't alot of money. You can make that with a bachelors or masters degree.


    These are full time faculty no associate faculty. I believe they're already underpaid. They probably could make much more in the private sector for their level of education.

    First of all furloughs should be illegal. If you have a contract can you be forced into something thats not in that required of you? Then the governor asks that you be kind enough not to take days during class off but rather planning days. If I was a college professor i'd take 10 school days off. I'm not saying that because im a college student and want to get out class but because if all professors did it then the state would have a problem. I found an article where a federal judge in Prince George's County, Maryland decided that furlough's were unconstitutional and that Prince George's County must pay back the money withheld.

    Pr. George's Furloughs Violated U.S. Constitution, Judge Rules - washingtonpost.com

    There are 22,000 employees we're talking about here.




    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/12/12/AR2008121203771.html

    I figure i'd look up how many deaths occur in MD and we were the 4th deadliest state in the country. Yeah, we could definately go without police officers :rolleyes:
    If Baltimore had the same population as New York our murder rate would be 3,644 people a year.
    According to crime statistics there were 276 homicides in Baltimore in 2006, the second-highest homicide rate per 100,000 of all U.S. cities of 250,000 or more population.[57] Though this is significantly lower than the record-high 379 homicides in 1993, the homicide rate in Baltimore is nearly seven times the national rate, six times the rate of New York City, and three times the rate of Los Angeles.
    Although other categories of crime in Baltimore have been declining, overall crime rates in Baltimore are still high compared to the national average. The rate of forcible rapes has fallen below the national average in recent years; however, Baltimore still has much higher-than-average rates of aggravated assault, burglary, robbery, and theft.

    Here's another quote...from the baltimore sun:
     
  2. Principessa

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    That's not news, it's just stupidity spreading like a virus. :irked: The Governor of Georgia declared a mandatory 3-6 day furlough in early August for colleges and publics schools K-12.

    I get that many states are in financial turmoil; but education should be the last thing NOT the first thing you cut. :mad:

    Georgia colleges to furlough employees 6 days



     
  3. Calboner

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    I'm amazed that the average is that high. The figure is probably skewed upward by the minority of professors who teach in the professional schools (law, business, engineering, medicine). In the liberal arts, the average has to be much lower, and of course the untenured make much less than the tenured. When I was teaching, with a Ph.D., I never got a salary above $35,000.
     
    #3 Calboner, Sep 3, 2009
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2009
  4. Rommette

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    I think its crazy....it seems like they say let's cut education first.
    Don't worry...it gets worse. The department of Natural Resources, Department of Agriculture, and Department of Housing and Community Development should be ok. Yeah, we care about the ecosystem and trees.....not so much about the people
     
  5. Rommette

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    Wait, you have a Ph.D and got paid less than $35,000? :eek: You must have been desperate or part time. Maybe you were at a community college. You make better money in the public defender's office with only a law degree. Or as a judicial clerk. I don't think furlough's are right. They want teacher's to take non class days off? When will our papers get graded? In class? :wtf1:Or when will they put together the study guide for our tests? (Yeah, my teachers rock!):lick: In class? Most of the time teachers have office hours on their days off so when will I be able to talk with my teacher about an assignment? The few minutes he may have in between classes?
     
  6. Calboner

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    This was in the period from 1999 to 2003, so it was a few years ago. I could probably get a whopping $40,000 if I could get the same job now. I was a visiting assistant professor (full-time but non-continuing) and a post-doctoral fellow at three research universities in succession. The post-doctoral position paid the most, and it also included a budget of $3,000 per year for research expenses, such as books and travel to conferences, which was a nice perk. When I was teaching as an adjunct instructor (the academic equivalent of a day laborer), I got $4,500 per course -- and I am pretty sure that is significantly higher than what adjuncts get in many parts of the country. When I was in graduate school, the going rate was $3,000 per course.

    Yeah, that's the kind of thing that all those unemployed Ph.D.'s out there are fighting over. I fought for a tenure-track job for fifteen years before I gave up. One interviewer once said to me, "I can't figure out how someone with a record like yours can be without a job." Of course, his department didn't offer me one either, so he should be able to answer his own question now.
     
  7. clear

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    Wow...:frown1:

    And to think I use to complain or feel bad about getting less then $3,500 in my bi-weekly check sometimes. Boy was I stupid and freak'n spoiled back then.

    I always assumed college professors- specifically those with Ph.D's -were making in excess of $150k+ a year starting. But more and more I am beginning to realize that the industry I'm in has really clouded/distorted my view about these kinds of things. *Sigh*

    In any case, do you all think that these college professors are the unwary participants of a much more sinister and pervasive phenomenon? Something more then the periodic state budget crises? Something more to do with the fact that there are more individuals earning higher level degrees now, then at any other time in history (or said another way: an over saturation/population of the ivory towers)?


    Regards,

    T.D.

    Ciao-
     
    #7 clear, Sep 4, 2009
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2009
  8. Principessa

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    Grrr, :angryfire2: don't be messin' with my boy Calboner, he is tops in his field! :cool: A lot of what a full tenured professor earns has to do with the school at which they teach, but also the subject they teach as well. In the halls of higher education ones salary has very little to do with ones education or worth.

    Lest we forget a football coach at a Big 10 school can easily earn $3 to $7 million per school year . . . and they don't teach a single class. :mad:
     
  9. crescendo69

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    I received $10,000 one year (9 months) for teaching in a liberal arts college in Kentucky in '79-'80. I'm almost glad it was a one year fill-in job. That was with a Masters degree.
     
  10. Dave NoCal

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    Welcome to my life. I'm a full professor and paid 75,000. That's with thirty years of experience and a Ph.D. from an Ivy League institution. We were just given 10% furloughs. This is California and, while salaries are higher, so are expenses. It's pretty tough because my husband has been in school for the last four years, after eight years in the Air Force, and we've been paying for everything out of my salary. OF course, being a gay couple we don't get any tax benefits. We finally broke down and took out educational loans for the last year of grad school. Nine more months to go. Even in these difficult times, almost all of the students graduating with his degree (MSW) get jobs pretty quickly. Fingers crossed.
    Dave
     
  11. Calboner

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    Thanks. But unfortunately for me they don't make academic hires on the basis of how one looks naked. :tongue:
     
  12. clear

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    I don't know njqt466. I don't think coaches like that can be classified as your typical degreed professors. If memory serves me correctly (and I admit that is a stretch, lol), coaches of the type you mention do not draw their salaries from their particular schools general fund. It is from ticket/merchandise sales of the schools various teams/franchises, that they make such exorbitant amounts. I mean they do receive a base salary (i.e. most times in the several hundred $K range), but nothing in the millions from what I remember. They only get those amounts from auxiliary sources.

    T-
     
  13. MickeyLee

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    :eek: for true? the world is riddled with injustice :frown1:

    have you tried attaching a nude photo to your resume? i'm not saying it's a for sure negotiation technique.... but i would be tempted to pad out your contract with extra vacation time and a car allowance :tongue:
     
  14. justmeincal

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    In your case they should! :biggrin1:
     
  15. Rommette

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    Why are people with such high levels of education given such low wages?
     
  16. Calboner

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    Well, I never got to the point of complaining about the pay; my chief complaint was and is the scarcity of long-term, full-time jobs. If the pay were greater, there would only be an even greater disparity between supply and demand. Anyway, the costs of higher education have already been rising for years, and there is no place for more money to come from. I suspect that what has been happening in academe is much like what has been happening in the United States overall since Reagan's presidency, namely an increasing concentration of income and fortune at the top. The academic "stars" get comparatively large salaries and light teaching loads, while the non-continuing faculty -- post-doctoral fellows, adjunct faculty, lecturers, and visiting professors -- do an ever-increasing share of the work for ever-decreasing pay and with no job security. The mass of tenured and tenure-track faculty are not badly off by comparison, but it gets harder and harder to join their ranks.
     
  17. Rommette

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    and who would have thought people with Ph.D's would have such problems
     
  18. Calboner

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    Well, before reading this thread I had no idea that so many people think that Ph.D.'s tend to hold secure and well-paying jobs! I always thought that people regarded us as a bunch of sorry chumps; but maybe I've just attributed my own view of us to them.
     
  19. jason_els

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    If I could live on 2/3 that amount and live in a higher taxed state with a higher cost of living, then I don't feel too sorry for those making "only" $61,000 a year with more time off, lower costs of living, and better health care.
     
  20. Rommette

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    Calboner I always thought people with Pd.D's made more money. I thought that was the incentive to continue education. Someone could stick with their masters and still make the same amount of money

    Jason i'm not saying college proffessors can't live off of that money but I think that they should be compensated for their hard work that took years. There are people out there in the private sector that can make twice what they may get paid as a teacher. The state and federal government always underpay its people with higher education. There was a guy who ran for re-election (I forgot for what) but he lost. You feel sorry for him until you hear he took a job as a lobbyist making $350,000 a year. He could have been a teacher i'm quite sure but why work harder for less money
     
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