Bill Would Bar Sex Offenders From Facebook and MySpace

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Principessa, Jan 30, 2008.

  1. Principessa

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    I think it's a great idea to keep track of sex offenders. However, it's relatively easy to set up a new e-mail or IM account with a different IP address. I don't see how this could possible be enforced. :confused:

    January 30, 2008

    Bill Would Bar Sex Offenders From Facebook and MySpace

    By TRYMAINE LEE
    ALBANY — Attorney General Andrew M. Cuomo and state lawmakers, with the backing of the social networking sites MySpace and Facebook, are pushing a bill that would crack down on sex offenders’ use of the sites.

    The law would require all registered sex offenders to submit any e-mail addresses and other Internet identifiers, such as screen names used for instant messaging, to the State Division of Criminal Justice Services within 10 days of their creation, just as with their home addresses.

    Offenders who fail to do so would be violating their parole or probation, Mr. Cuomo said.

    Under the bill, Level 3 sex offenders, whom the state considers the most dangerous and most likely to commit another sex crime, and sex offenders who used the Internet to commit sex crimes or who committed crimes against minors would be barred from social networking sites. Such offenders would also be barred from communicating online with children.
    Lower-level sex offenders and sex offenders who did not use the Internet in their crimes would not be barred from the sites under the bill. MySpace and Facebook said, however, they would bar them anyway.

    The bill also would allow the state to share the e-mail addresses with sites like Facebook and MySpace. Officials with both companies have agreed to check their databases against the lists provided by the state. If the addresses match, the companies said that they would terminate the users’ accounts and alert the authorities. When setting up accounts with the sites, users must submit valid e-mail addresses.
    Mr. Cuomo, along with the Senate majority leader, Joseph L. Bruno, Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver and other lawmakers, unveiled the bill on Tuesday. “This will take us to the next level,” said Mr. Cuomo, who applauded the bipartisan support for the bill. “It’s not just a conceptual agreement we have. There is a specific bill that is written.”

    “We have to admit that life is different than when we were growing up,” said Assemblyman Joseph R. Lentol, a Democrat from Brooklyn and a supporter of the bill. “We avoid letting our children go to the playground now. We avoid the opportunity for them to walk to school alone and not have some protection, or go to the mall alone. Yet our children are as much at risk in our own homes as they are anywhere — on our computers.”

    Mr. Cuomo said that he did not believe that the bill, in tracking sex offenders and possibly restricting their Internet access, would violate their rights.

    In May, MySpace implemented a program called Sentinel Safe, a sex offender database, and used it to find and delete the profiles of registered sex offenders, said Hemanshu Nigam, the chief security officer for the company.
     
  2. IntoxicatingToxin

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    Well, the only thing you can do is wait for them to get caught, I guess. I dunno. It's no different than guys who look at child porn or whatever. They can always do it again.
     
  3. B_Think_Kink

    B_Think_Kink New Member

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    A different email address wont change your IP address. Calling your ISP would though.
     
  4. Principessa

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    Whatever, my point is it's easy to go to an internet cafe or library and get a yahoo or hotmail account.


     
  5. B_ScaredLittleBoy

    B_ScaredLittleBoy New Member

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    Or they could just be smart and not use their real name(s)? :rolleyes:

    Just another bill that sounds good on paper but that's all it is: talk.
     
  6. SpoiledPrincess

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    I don't know how they think they'd implement this.
     
  7. DC_DEEP

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    Spot on, Princess. This kind of thing is a little disturbing for several reasons, the first and foremost being implementation.

    In the description, it does sound good - on paper. If New York did it, though, I'm sure other states would follow suite. It's easier in some states to be labeled a sex offender than it is in other states, though.

    I'm guessing it's just a pandering measure... a law that means nothing, will cost lots of money, but gives constituents a warm-fuzzy feeling that the lawmakers are tough on crime, tougher on sex crimes. Oh, and if law enforcement decides they want to nab a particular individual, for no particular reason, they will have some ammunition.
     
  8. SpoiledPrincess

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    Exactly my thinking, if they can't really control a problem they make noises about it that will lull some people into thinking they're doing something about it.
     
  9. DC_DEEP

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    Oh, I forgot to add something, Princess, that I think was something you posted in another thread:

    If these guys are such a threat, and so "likely to re-offend," then why are they out on the streets in the first place?
     
  10. SpoiledPrincess

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    Whilst paedophiles are a threat to our children I really consider there are far bigger dangers out there, use sensible safety precautions, educate your kids to protect themselves, don't let young kids out alone or with anyone you're not 100% sure of - and remember it's usually a family member.
     
  11. B_VinylBoy

    B_VinylBoy New Member

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    It's gullible news for those who are gullible about the internet and how it works.
     
  12. MASSIVEPKGO_CHUCK

    MASSIVEPKGO_CHUCK Well-Known Member

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    The naivete of lawmakers with regards to this never ceases to astound me.

    What's to stop these guys from secretly setting up an account somewhere under an assumed name?

    But on the other hand, the offeneders forfeited their actual rights to any kind of privacy when they broke the law, so the assumption that they deserve any equitable treatment is immaterial.
     
  13. DC_DEEP

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    The lawmakers are NOT naive, they are manipulative. They know full well that such a law is pretty much unenforceable, and they know full well that they will have to pay someone (I wonder if any of their friends are in the "internet security" field...?) to implement and monitor any "enforcement."

    I repeat - it's nothing more than pandering, pushing the buttons of their gullible voters.

    Ah, I can just hear Helen Lovejoy in the background, wailing "Won't somebody, please, think of the children!"
     
  14. MASSIVEPKGO_CHUCK

    MASSIVEPKGO_CHUCK Well-Known Member

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    the pain behind your eyes
    Well, if anything, the lawmakers sure aren't Mensa candidates to even think about letting these vile fucks out of prison at all if they're to be considered dangerous for the web.
     
  15. DC_DEEP

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    I cannot disagree with that. But it's a separate issue. I'm just saying that rather than pass such a law to whip up panic, and appease the masses, perhaps a better idea would be to modify existing laws that would keep recidivists in jail.

    I still believe that they know precisely what they are doing.
     
  16. MASSIVEPKGO_CHUCK

    MASSIVEPKGO_CHUCK Well-Known Member

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    For my feelings, I can't discount the fact that these people still potentially pose a danger to society, and as such, still maintain that they should stay incarcerated.
     
  17. Freddie53

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    This is a band aid to cover what the real serious issues are. Family incest and abuse. I've known of cases where children have been put back into the very homes where they were abused.

    Also, I believe this is part of an attempt by the government to take complete control of the Internet. For a long time, the press was big corporations. But in colonial days, it didn't take a huge conglomerate to print a newspaper.

    Now with Internet, it is possible for a person to run a news paper relatively free. Blogs are an example. And the use of My Space and U-Tube are certainly examples.

    The vast majority of child abuse comes from an adult that the child already knows and trusts.

    I agree with hte poster who said that it is the parents that need to teach responsibility to their children. I support parental controls as long as it is voluntary as in not required by the government.

    Elementary boys have been finding their fathers stash of playboys for decades. But for some reason it is portrayed as much worse if those same boys find a porn site on their own.

    It is a GREAT FEAR OF THE INTERNET and an attempt to cover up the fact that way to little is being done to protect our children from family members who abuse them.

    As for My Space...they want something to protect their ass should they get sued by an irate parent.

    If a child gets into the wrong stuff on the Internet at home, it is the parents' responsibility and not anyone elses.
     
  18. DC_DEEP

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    I agree with you wholeheartedly, but with a caveat. If they do actually pose a danger to society, behind bars is precisely where they should be, not out in some soccer-mom community and their face on the corkboard at the local 7-11.

    Absolute, beyond-any-shadow-of-a-doubt predators should not be re-integrated. That poses some other ethical questions (at least in my odd logic), but they are not germane to this discussion.

    Keep in mind that if other states follow the lead, we can't know how similar laws will be worded or enforced. Under current law in some states, if a cop catches you with your wife giving you a blowjob in your car in a parking lot (or at Make-out Point), you are labeled as a sexual offender.

    Also, on those rare occasions where an innocent is convicted on hearsay evidence, obviously, these kinds of laws really suck.

    And I'm still agreeing with you that predators have given up a number of rights, (I truly believe that), but laws like this proposal are not now, nor have they ever been, nor will they ever be, about actually protecting the public.
     
  19. SandraSmithCarver

    SandraSmithCarver New Member

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    It's a great idea,, but how would they enforce it?
    I have 3 boys, teenagers, i have always had the computor out in a common room, like the family room, so i always knew what they were doing,, but comes a time, when you have to trust them
     
  20. SpoiledPrincess

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    I was the same, I didn't let my kids use the computer unsupervised until they were 16 - at which time I considered I'd taught them to be sensible, but some people don't, they allow their young children unlimited access to the net then when their kids get in trouble they place the blame anywhere but where it belongs - with them. If little kids are out and they get run over it's because they shouldn't have been out in the first place, it's exactly the same with the net and life in general, until we've given them the tools to cope we shouldn't allow our kids to be in situations where they might encounter danger of any sort.
     
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