Black on black crime, or, at last, a blast of frank admission and open honesty

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by b.c., Nov 28, 2007.

  1. b.c.

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    ...because for too long we have embraced this culture of blame shifting and misdirected priorities while we kill each other, and while the "perps" sell us bullshit logic with their "don't be a snitch" ghetto mentality.

    High time the buck stops where it rightfully should. Read on...

    FOX Sports on MSN - NFL - Taylor's death a grim reminder for us all
     
  2. B_Think_Kink

    B_Think_Kink New Member

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    I guess I knew nothing about the football player other than he was someone who was shot in the leg? Any how the article makes lots of sense. I'm just not living in the states so I'm unsure as to what the 'mob mentality' is like down there.
     
  3. odd_fish_9

    odd_fish_9 New Member

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    "the buck stops where it rightfully should"

    ... Where, on Fox?
     
  4. rob_just_rob

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    I had wondered if Whitlock had found a new forum after being booted from ESPN.com.

    One does wonder exactly what is being accomplished by the "gangsta" culture that makes it so alluring.
     
  5. Osiris

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    Thanks b.c., this was a great article and hits the mark.

    Jason Whitlock is one of the best sports writers period. I always loved when he would do an editorial piece in the KC Star.

    The gangsta or thug culture is out of control, moreso in the inner city, but I think the other thing Sean Taylor's tragic death proves is no matter the neighborhood, it still will happen.

    Sad part about Taylor is he may have been getting his life together, but the thug life followed. A lot has been said about his past and if he was gang related, sometimes you cannot escape it.

    These thugs get money and often times move to the upper class rich areas. I have news for them:

    You can wrap shit in silk and ermine, but it still stinks.
     
  6. Principessa

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    You are so right! Money doesn't buy class, respect, or brains. Nor does it erase a gangsta past. . .

    Taylor's death a grim reminder for us all
    Jason Whitlock/ FOXSports.com
    Posted: 2 hours ago


    There's a reason I call them the Black KKK. The pain, the fear and the destruction are all the same.


    Someone who loved Sean Taylor is crying right now. The life they knew has been destroyed, an 18-month-old baby lost her father, and, if you're a black man living in America, you've been reminded once again that your life is in constant jeopardy of violent death.

    The Black KKK claimed another victim, a high-profile professional football player with a checkered past this time.

    No, we don't know for certain the circumstances surrounding Taylor's death. I could very well be proven wrong for engaging in this sort of aggressive speculation. But it's no different than if you saw a fat man fall to the ground clutching his chest. You'd assume a heart attack, and you'd know, no matter the cause, the man needed to lose weight.

    Well, when shots are fired and a black man hits the pavement, there's every statistical reason to believe another black man pulled the trigger. That's not some negative, unfair stereotype. It's a reality we've been living with, tolerating and rationalizing for far too long.

    When the traditional, white KKK lynched, terrorized and intimidated black folks at a slower rate than its modern-day dark-skinned replacement, at least we had the good sense to be outraged and in no mood to contemplate rationalizations or be fooled by distractions.
     
  7. b.c.

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    I read your responsed in the related thread regarding "civil liberties", "gun control" and the like, a perhaps you are somewhat removed from the situation (being from "yonder")... perhaps not... I don't know.

    This however is not about gun control, civil liberties or anything of the sort. It's about being fed up with being at greater risk of armed robbery, murder, and assault and angered about the 95% probability that the perpertrator is going to be another black person.

    It's about being mad as hell that the local news spends days talking about the senseless murder of non black individuals while often paying only honorable mention to black victims of crime (except famous ones of course). And it's about the fact that crimes against blacks get treated with less seriousness and fewer convictions in the courts.

    It's about being pissed as all hell that all of this seems to be generally accepted without much noise or protest within the (black) community. That's why I say maybe it's high time the buck stops here.

    In my area in particular there have been a rash of crimes involving people casually walking into the homes of families and killing people...even people working outside of their homes trying to rebuild.

    And this don't snitch mentality REALLY takes the cake. As if the law is our enemy and the people killing us are our "homies". No one comes forward, no one sees anything...

    One has to wonder just what kind of asshole loser mentality allows for that kind of rationale...allows for murder and other crimes to happen in the full view of (sometimes) dozens of witnesses, yet "nobody ever saw nuthin". Pathetic.
     
  8. odd_fish_9

    odd_fish_9 New Member

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    I was simplly noting that this rare wisdom had to come to us via Fox, which as I'm sure you know is generally reviled as a pit of reaction by many, perhaps most, on this board.

    I suspect that modern liberalism is simply unable to admit the problem, let alone consider ways to deal with it.
     
  9. Mr. Snakey

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    I have respesct for him saying what he said.
     
  10. dhsdad

    dhsdad New Member

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    He has his opinion, and so does everyone else. It's interesting how we, and I mean that literally, have subscribed to blaming the victim. There is no correlation between color and crime. There is a correlation between color and disenfranchisement, which leads to crime.

    I see this guy (the author) as a sellout. His story will be embraced by million, because it removes any responsibility from society at large and drops it in the black community.

    I'm not tricked Mr. Whitlock...you will rise several notches in mass society for your willingness to substantiate a myth..but we know what you really did and are not pleased.
     
  11. Mr. Snakey

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    Why he said what he said is not the point. The point is this is something that needs to be talked about. He is a black man talking about his own race. He has every right too.
     
  12. simcha

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    Yeah, I work with clients who grew up with this mentality. The police and the law are ALWAYS the enemy. And so, you do vigilante things like revenge killings and the neighborhood violence never stops. It's very hard to counter this as a white male working with mainly African Americans and Latin Americans. No one is willing to listen to me because I'm seen as one of "them" much of the time. Therefore whenever I talk about going to the police or a lawyer to clear up a warrant I get stiff resistance.

    And, sometimes that attitude is correct. There are crooked cops, crooked judges, and crooked lawyers who screw non-white people in our system. So it's a difficult conundrum to say the least.

    I think the true culprit in all of this is disenfranchisement. When you are part of the underclass (and this class is growing) you don't get justice because you can't afford it. Often the system is against you. It's sad but often true.

    However, if you never use the law to your own advantage, vote, become political, and try to CHANGE the system, nothing will change. The trouble is that disenfranchised people these days have given up and don't vote and don't complain enough.

    I believe we are headed toward a revolution one of these days because as the mob of disenfranchised people grows and gets angrier someone is going to organize the disenfranchised and someone is going to get violent. The upper classes don't realize that they are creating the problem that forces them to live in gated communities and that will one day destroy them.

    Just my opinion from working in the trenches.
     
  13. Principessa

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    I read the article twice . . .where was the trick? Did it involve mirrors? What is the myth which you believe he has substantiated? Just what is it that he has really done which so displeases you? :confused:
     
  14. B_DEATHbyCARROT

    B_DEATHbyCARROT New Member

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    Before you add that "we" at the end maybe you should specify who that is.

    A) No matter what has happened in a human being's life they are responsible for their actions. Sort of like a guy growing up in an abusive household (which is horrible) and then growing up to abuse his family. He still has to answer for the wrong he's done, regardless of his past no matter how unfair it is. African American culture is now at a point in which it can either follow its worst elements or it can decide "hey, it isnt cool to be a thug after all".

    B) The simple fact is that it doesn't actually help the fairly dire situation that exists in poor black neighborhoods to blame anyone else.

    C) Whitlock said: "Well, when shots are fired and a black man hits the pavement, there's every statistical reason to believe another black man pulled the trigger. That's not some negative, unfair stereotype. It's a reality we've been living with, tolerating and rationalizing for far too long."

    He's right.

    He's not selling out he's standing up and we need more public people to say it. I would love nothing more than by the time my kids are born the idea of BoB crime and the idea of being a thug or gangsta are all looked at as embarrassments by black culture. Right now they clearly are not and that is more of a danger to black than any outside force in my opinion...
     
  15. Osiris

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    "Before we can openly embrace other races and cultures, we must repair the problems within our own community. Then and only then can we fully embrace other races without prejudice."

    --Malcolm X after his journey to Mecca.

    Was he so wrong? Is Mr. Whitlock in a more convoluted way not saying the same thing? We all know this is a problem.

    My muffler is damaged. I'm going to take my car to the muffler shop and not to Detroit to the auto maker. Why? Because it is a localized problem that doesn't need the larger wider system to repair it.

    That said, why should all of society repair a problem that is most prevalent within the black community?

    Malcolm X understood the journey of a thousand miles begins with one step. Healing our community is the frist step to the journey to greater unity.
     
  16. HazelGod

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    John Singleton did a bang-up job almost 20 years ago putting this reality right in everyone's face. I recently re-watched Boys n the Hood a couple months ago, and was pretty shocked and dismayed to realize that very little has changed since 1990. The survival rate of young black men in urban areas is still unacceptably low for civilized human beings, and as was pointed out, the most probable threat to their survival are other young black men.
     
  17. odd_fish_9

    odd_fish_9 New Member

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    That was tried forty years ago. Surely you're old enough to remember the Panthers. That experiment was a disaster from which race relations have yet to recover.

    A racist split is not along lower/upper class lines, despite attempts by academic Marxists to portray it as such. Violence by the "disenfranchised" will be met by violence from everyone else, not just twits huddled behind their gates. Do you seriously think that the "disenfranchised" can possibly win that war?
     
  18. Bbucko

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    I find this thread deeply demoralizing on many levels.

    As much as I agree with this:
    This is disturbing, and I hate to disagree with my friend Osiris:
    How does the black community address this problem separately? Should they have their own courts/police? Has the perception of disenfranchisement become so fixed and entrenched that the American justice system is seen as irrelevant?

    I'll not disagree that the system of education and justice has failed generations of black youth, but can't it be fixed as an instrument of society as a whole?

    Wouldn't anything less be considered utter abandonment? Has everything really come that far?
     
  19. Osiris

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    This is SO true. Excellent example. Boyz N the Hood was a good movie.

    Not to worry Bbucko. You are still on my Christmas card list. :biggrin1:

    Because it does take a village to raise the children and a great number of us in the black community are lagging in our parental duties. I'm not saying it makes all black parents bad, but have we become too obsessed on making more and more money to get our kids out of the ghetto that we lose sight of what we need to truly be focused on as parents? I know my folks did at times and I don'tr necessarily hold it against them, but the young black children need to know the right and wrong of life and I think that as a whole community we have failed in this. Malcolm X saw this as well.
     
  20. Bbucko

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    This really struck me. The "ghetto mindset" is much more than an economic condition. I guess at a certain level it involves embracing the wider values of what could be perceived as one's oppressors.

    Throughout American history, the latest arrivals have been treated abysmally: The Irish in the mid-19th century; Italians and Jews at the turn of the 20th; Latinos today. They only found real acceptance by renouncing their ethnicity and embracing the wider values of the American middle class.

    The one exception to this is African-Americans, who've always been here and (with the exception of very small pockets) have never found acceptance from greater society in their quest for assimilation and greater opportunity.
     
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