Books

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by chosencock399, Aug 25, 2008.

  1. chosencock399

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    Alright I've finished or got bored of all the books I've been reading, so I'm looking for recommendations. I don't really read fiction so something educational please. I'm into philosophy, comedy, history, science etc. Nothing too heavy though. Any recommendations would be appreciated. Thanks!
     
  2. flame boy

    flame boy Account Disabled

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    If you havent already read it, I would suggest Cormac McCarthy's "The Road" which is quite a brilliant read - Wikipedia - The Road
     
  3. Northland

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    Maybe you will find some ideas from these past threads on reading.

    Night Table Reading
    What book are you reading now?
    What book are you currently reading?

    There should be something in there which will be of interest to you. At this time, I am between reads.
     
  4. chosencock399

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    Like I said, I don't really read fiction, but that does actually sound pretty interesting, provided the writer pulls it off?

    Thanks a lot.
     
  5. tallicadude

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    if youre into sciency stuff check out "a short history of nearly everything" by Bill Bryson. No need to read it front to back, as you can dip into whatever subject you feel like. Ranges from the theory of relativity to fossils etc. Quite entertaining.
     
  6. invisibleman

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    Cracking Creativity By Michael Michalko

    Thinkertoys By Michael Michalko
    [SIZE=+0]
    [SIZE=+0]The New Master Key System by Charles F. Haanel, Ruth L. Miller, Ph.D., and James Boles.[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=+0][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=+0]The Secret by Rhonda Byrne[/SIZE]

    Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu[/SIZE]


    The Comedy Bible by Judy Carter

    The Holocaust Museum In Washington (coffeetable book) by Jeshajahu Weinberg and Rina Elieli (I always wanted to go to this museum. So this was the closest thing to being there. Amazing pictures of the museum and exhibits. The architecture. The layout and design elements are truly amazing. Everything in that museum has a purpose to convey something. Amazing historical facts and stories about the Holocaust and its survivors.)

    Hitler's Willing Executioners: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust by Daniel Jonah Goldhagen.

     
  7. prince_will

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    how about Angela's Ashes?

    it's a memoir about the life of Frank McCourt. I believe it won the Pulitzer. anyways, it's a really great read. McCourt is a genius and the book never gets boring.

    and a good thing is if you like the book, he has already written two sequels to it.

    but the Road is pretty great too. It's fiction, but very moving, tender and yet, somewhat horrifying.
     
  8. ballsaplenty2156

    ballsaplenty2156 New Member

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    For something lightly humorous and yet educational, try Weird History 101 by Stephens.
    It is a good read and very interesting.
     
  9. cockoloco

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    I recently decided to start reading literature classics again. I just finished Wuthering Heights and I'm starting The Picture of Dorian Gray right now.
     
  10. Calboner

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    Two popular-scientific books that I have found interesting and that seem to me relevant to a lot of threads on this site:

    1. Why People Believe Weird Things: Pseudoscience, Superstition, and Other Confusions of Our Time by Michael Shermer.

    Dedicated to Carl Sagan, with a foreword by Stephen Jay Gould, this book by the publisher of Skeptic magazine and the Director of the Skeptics Lecture Series at California Institute of Technology, has the pedigree to be accepted as a work of scholarly value. Fortunately, it is also readable, interesting, and well indexed and provides an extensive bibliography. The author discusses such topics of current interest as alien abduction, near-death experiences, psychics, recovered memories, and denial of the Holocaust. Never patronizing to his opponents, Shermer explains why people may truly believe that they were held by aliens (he had a similar experience himself) or have recovered a memory of childhood satanic-ritual abuse. He clearly explains, often with pictures, tables, or graphs, the fallacy of such beliefs in terms of scientific reasoning. While teens may find the first section of the book about "Science and Skepticism" a bit too philosophical and ponderous, the rest of it will surely captivate them. Read cover to cover or by section, or used as a reference tool, this book is highly recommended for young adults.
    2. Thomas Gilovich, How We Know What Isn't So: The Fallibility of Human Reason in Everyday Life.

    Sports fans who think that basketball players shoot in "hot streaks," and maternity nurses who maintain that more babies are born when the moon is full adhere to erroneous beliefs, according to Gilovich, associate professor of psychology at Cornell. With examples ranging from the spread of AIDS to the weight of Scholastic Aptitude Test scores, he skewers popular but mistaken assumptions. Faulty reasoning from incomplete or ambiguous data, a tendency to seek out "hypothesis-confirming evidence" and the habit of self-serving belief are among the factors Gilovich pinpoints in his sophisticated anaylsis. However, in the book's second half, his debunking of holistic medicine, ESP and paranormal phenomena is superficial and one-sided, marred by some of the very tendencies he effectively exposes in the "true believers." ​
     
  11. chosencock399

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    Thanks for all the recomendations, I picked up the book Tallicadude recommended in the end, it was only a tenner, so far it's pretty good. I'm gonna check out some of these others once I'm finished.

    I looked over this in the bookshop before I found the one I was recommended, it looks pretty good. Decent topic to write a book on, I'll check it out at some point.
     
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