BP Caps Oil Leak

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by unabear09, Jul 15, 2010.

  1. unabear09

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  2. Rikter8

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    Cute that the robot dropped a little cap on it. Looks done to the rest of the world.
    9000 psi would blow that little topper to high heaven.

    Too bad they didnt weld the top debris cap on for good. Instead - they have to salvage the well to extract more oil.
    Never mind the rig with cooked bodies laying beside it. That's just an illusion.
     
  3. SweetLovesVick

    SweetLovesVick New Member

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    Yes about time! It is VERY hard to believe this oil company could not work faster on this problem. They had to know since the company was first started that at any time a break/leak could happen. Safety checks would have been nice. I love how they had enough time to get all sorts of layers to work on dividing up the company for possible bankrupt procedures in the future. I feel sorry for the people who died in the huge fire. I hope their families are taken care of and not shoved aside like these big companies love to do.
     
  4. Rikter8

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    It aint over till that Fat lady Cheney is singing.

    Pressure checks are next, which could rupture the well, or pop up other leaks unforseen.

    The issue is, that was one hell of a tug on the well. You don't know what else is leaking or working its way to the top of the ocean floor from that kind of tug.
     
  5. unabear09

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    wow....glad to see no one gives a shit!
     
  6. helgaleena

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    They already capped it once wrong, so forgive our skepticism, una...
     
  7. faceking

    faceking Well-Known Member

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    well said...

    and btw... for the stock minded.... great value in BP stock... and even Transocean (RIG)...[been a fan for years]... and even the non-incidental like Halliburton are great value....
     
  8. Stretch

    Stretch New Member

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    I can only speak for myself. It's not that I don't give a shit...the exact opposite is true. They say a cap is in place. That's all fine and good, but assuming, and it's only assumption at this point, that the cap holds and there are no further leaks, explosions or any number of other unforeseen side effects or possible setbacks, this is just the first blip on a very long, painful journey of cleanup and recovery. Since the middle of April oil has been gushing into the waters of the gulf. As Max said, upwards to 10 million gallons. I'm afraid we haven't even begun to see the cataclysmic outfall from this epic disaster. The amount of wildlife, both flora and fauna, that will eventually be devastated and destroyed, the economy of all the gulf states that will be effected for years to come, the myriad people whose lives will be forever altered, etc. There will be a huge amount of political and corporate, if those two entities can even be thought of as separate anymore, maneuvering and vast amounts of money's spent, skimmed and misplaced.

    Yes it will, of course, be wonderful if they have finally managed to cap this thing. But there should have been better preventive measures in place to begin with, a better response plan, and a much quicker way to cap it or shut it down. I do realize that not all contingencies can be planned or accounted for, especially when nature is involved. Maybe, however, if they'd taken half the money they spent on lobbying for deregulation, along with a larger percentage of their billions in profits and funneled it towards emergency and clean-up research and technology, this wouldn't have turned into the disaster it is. So as much as I give a shit that the oil leeak "might" be capped, there is, in my opinion, not much reason to celebrate.

    I'm sorry if I haven't been quite as cogent or concise as I set out to be but it's 5:13 in the morning here and I've been up for 22 hours.

    Good night
     
  9. maxcok

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    Apologies Stretch, apparently you referenced a post I deleted. I had come up with the 10 million gallon estimate out of figures in my (tired) head, and within minutes of posting I realized it was way off. I deleted, with the intention of reposting when I had my numbers right. It's actually much worse.

    Excerpted from the AP:
    NEW ORLEANS – The oil has stopped. For now. After 85 days and up to 184 million gallons, BP finally gained control over one of America's biggest environmental catastrophes Thursday by placing a carefully fitted cap over a runaway geyser that has been gushing crude into the Gulf of Mexico since early spring. If the cap holds, if the sea floor doesn't crack and if the relief wells being prepared are completed successfully, this could be the beginning of the end for the spill. But that's a lot of 'ifs', and no one was declaring any sort of victory beyond the moment. "It's a great sight," said BP Chief Operating Officer Doug Suttles, who immediately urged caution. The flow, he said, could resume. "It's far from the finish line. ... It's not the time to celebrate."

    The worst-case scenario would be if the oil forced down into the bedrock ruptured the seafloor irreparably. Leaks deep in the well bore might also be found, which would mean that oil would continue to flow into the Gulf. And there's always the possiblity of another explosion, either from too much pressure or from a previously unknown unstable piece of piping. Engineers and scientists will be monitoring the cap around the clock, looking for pressure changes. The next 48 hours are critical.

    Thad Allen, the retired Coast Guard admiral overseeing the spill for the government, said they are deciding as they go along whether to release oil into the water again. At the end of the 48-hour test it's possible oil will start to flow again — but, theoretically, in a controlled manner. When the test is complete, more seafloor mapping will be done to detect any damage or deep-water leaks.

    Long after the out-of-control well is finally plugged, oil could still be washing up in marshes and on beaches as tar balls or disc-shaped patties. The sheen will dissolve over time, scientists say, and the slick will convert to another form. There's also fear that months from now, oil could move far west to Corpus Christi, Texas, or farther east and hitch a ride on the loop current, possibly showing up as tar balls in Miami or North Carolina's Outer Banks.

    In Louisiana's Plaquemines Parish, the worst-hit area of the coast, frequent BP and government critic Billy Nungesser, the parish president, offered a word of caution: "This whole mess," he said, "is far from over."



    Not to further rain on the parade, but just to keep things in perspective: the BP disaster in volume of oil spilled so far is, according wide-ranging estimates, anywhere from 6 to 16 times the amount of the Exxon Valdez disaster, perhaps more. 21 years after that event, the oil, especially subsurface oil, and the environmental damage in Prince William Sound persists. Many species have been wiped out completely, others are seriously compromised, much of the fishing industry has been destroyed, the economic impact is devastating, and the psychological damage to the community is incalcuable. While I think the governmental response to Gulf residents thus far has been notably far more sensitive and proactive compared to how the Alaskans were treated, still the repercussions of 1989 serve as foreshadowing for the future of life in the Gulf region. - MC





    Max:.*crossing fingers*..*holding breath*..*curbing irrational exuberance*

     
    #9 maxcok, Jul 16, 2010
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2010
  10. Stretch

    Stretch New Member

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    Thanks Max. I thought as much. 10 milion, though by any standard a staggering amount, seemed way too small a number for a 3 month figure. I was just too tired and finished to check it myself. 184 million gallons...incomprehensible, a way more devastating amount. The gist of my post remains the same.
     
  11. bambulance

    bambulance New Member

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    This "cap" should have been a closed valve that they could open to pipe the oil to the surface if the pressure doesn't hold.
     
  12. helgaleena

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    stocks for the ethically deficient? cheap at half the price. I prefer making my own stock out of boiled bones.
     
  13. Rikter8

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    Damnit STOP THAT your thinking ahead!

    Oh yea.. it didnt hold. It's leaking natural gas and oil.

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100719/ap_on_bi_ge/us_gulf_oil_spill

    A snippet taken from the Yahoo Article, per the above link:

    Really? I'll buy the methane gas but crude? I can't imagine crude is going to bubble out of the ocean floor.... that is... unless that big ol tug caused offshoot leakage through the well.
     
    #13 Rikter8, Jul 19, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 20, 2010
  14. maxcok

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    I think you got lost in the wrong thread, Helga. :wink:
     
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