British Airways Flight BA38 Crash Lands At Heathrow Airport

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by dong20, Jan 17, 2008.

  1. dong20

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  2. Gillette

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    Fingers crossed that Headbang8 is still safely in China.

    That's a scary thing. The report says they didn't even have time to declare an emergency. Kudos to the pilots for handling it as well as they did.
     
  3. dong20

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    Indeed...as for the pilots; let's hope it wasn't down to them. It should be an 'easy' investigation.
    Whatever the cause, the outcome could certainly have been far worse.
     
  4. B_houugadunor

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    Glad no one is hurt etc etc,

    I saw the news footage however and whatever the cause was "running shot of the runway" was slightly inaccurate, it missed it by quite a distance. I hope it wasnt the pilots fault that would be a touch worrying, but I'm pretty sure most planes are landed on auto pilot / assisted landing.
     
  5. dong20

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    Actually no, landings are (with instrument assistance) almost invariably manual. Many aircraft are capable of full 'auto-landing' (including the B777) but it's seldom used due to the cost of ground equipment.
     
  6. HazelGod

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    The Mrs. and I heard this on CNN this morning...they were reporting that the prime minister was on an outbound plane already on the tarmac at the time and was delayed.

    We looked at each other and asked, "Why the hell is the British PM flying commercial?!?"
     
  7. Mem

    Mem
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    This does not mean that he is flying commercial. Even Air Force One has to leave from an Airport.
     
  8. headbang8

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    Dong, Gillette,

    Yes, I did fly from Beijing today (Thursday). And I'm now safely at home in Munich.

    I'm a little spooked. I was booked on that very flight until last Thursday, when my secretary told me that the accounts department insisted I fly Air China via Frankfurt because it cost less.

    Thank the universe for cheapskates! And thank you both for your concern.

    HB8
     
  9. jason_els

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    Does it sound like it stalled?

    A simultaneous double engine failure?

    Where's Claire? I interpret this as a stall: angle too high, both engines die, plane drops out of the sky.

    The pilot has 20 years experience flying and the plane is only 6 years old.

    This is disturbing.

    Glad to know you're home safe headbang8! At least you likely wouldn't have been injured though I'm not sure you'd ever want to wear the same pair of trousers again.
     
  10. viking1

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    Does sound like a stall in some ways. Why did the engines loose power is the biggest question? May also not have been a stall. The pilot could have been trying to extend the glide slope as much as possible to make the runway.
     
  11. dong20

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    It's mostly speculation at this point. Accounts suggest the engines were running (engine noise), so perhaps some form of hydraulic/control surface and/or electrical or (heaven forbid - B787 thread) software failure. Perhaps the crew simply screwed up the approach, or some combination. More speculation and, as usual plenty of conflicting reports from 'eye witnesses'.

    The aircraft is pretty much intact, the crew are around to tell and I'm sure Boeing will be keen to find out what happened (whether the flying public do is another matter of course).

    HB, glad you made it back OK. Random chance, it's a funny feeling isn't it?
     
  12. dong20

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    Sometimes he does, or sometime 'he' will charter a commercial jet. Other times (and only on official business) he will use an RAF aircraft. Any of these can be from a commercial airport or a military base. He used to use aircraft of the Royal Flight but got caned for it, and rightly so.

    Back in Blair's PM ship, there was talk (2003 as I recall) of a 'Blair Force One' but no way could that be justified on any grounds, as Parliament pointed out to him.
     
  13. SpeedoGuy

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    "Stalls" in aviation parlance rarely have to do with engine problems or electrical failure. Instead, "stall" usually means the airflow over the wings has been interrupted and become turbulent rather than smooth. This is usually because of an excessive "angle of attack" (wings at too great an angle with respect to the oncoming airflow).

    http://airwarrior.afkamm.co.uk/Aerodynamics/stall.gif
     
  14. Pecker

    Pecker Retired Moderator
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    Where will they bury the surivors? On British soil?
     
  15. Drifterwood

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    Can you narrow that down a bit please? :biggrin1:
     
  16. Principessa

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    Come on now Drifterwood. :smile: The days of the sun never setting on British soil are long gone. :cool::rolleyes::redface:
     
  17. Gillette

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    You wouldn't bury the survivors though it's likely most soiled themselves.
    British or not.
     
  18. jason_els

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    But that's what I was referring to!

    If you read the account, an airport employee stated that the angle of attack appeared to be very high. If the angle is too high and then the engines starve for air, then they stall as well.

     
  19. jason_els

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    Technically..... no.

    The UK still has enough little islands here and there so that truly the sun still never sets on the United Kingdom.

     
  20. ClaireTalon

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    A simultaneous double engine failure is something that rarely ever occurs. I can't think of a precedence now, though there are a number of cases of complete power loss, mostly due to fuel shortage.

    My personal haunch would be a meteorological fuck-up, a wind shear probably. The pilot should have been warned of this, but it is the most probable explanation in my eyes. I know an electric failure during approach from my own experience, it did not require to rush the landing. And I don't think two experienced pilots will panic if it occurs to them.

    I'm totally with you, so far there is only speculation. I don't give much into eyewitness reports, especially if the witnesses don't want their names to be published.

    It could be an engine stall, but a simultaneous engine stall on both engines is something I have never heard of happening. Engine stalls on final are tricky, it would need at least 20 or 30 seconds to recover for a go-around.

    Another matter on the electric systems loss. I have a few accidents report from ASN, usually a reliable source. Here we go.

    Martinair, 5/28/96 (B-767-31/AER)

    AirTran, 3/26/03 (B-717-2BD)


     
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