Chaos in Guinea after Conte dies

Discussion in 'Politics' started by dong20, Dec 23, 2008.

  1. dong20

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    Another West African nation that has (so it seems) failed to learn the lessons of its past.

    Guinea under Conte, (an Ex - General[issimo], himself) has enjoyed a brief flirtation with 'democracy' since the 1990s - merely a facade for a formula dictatorship. He also survived the mandatory assassination attempt(s) - one that I know of, perhaps more.

    Now, it would appear that the nation is set to repeat a cycle that has blighted so many:

    "The institutions of the republic have shown themselves to be incapable of resolving the crises which have been confronting the country," Captain Moussa Dadis Camara said in an address on Radio Conakry."

    Ah yes, the familiar refrain - from a mere captain - though I'm sure he will be a 'General' soon enough. Guinea was runner up (to Haiti) in the global corrupt nation awards, 2007 - perhaps it will now aim for the top spot.

    BBC NEWS | Africa | Military takes control in Guinea
     
  2. lipollo

    lipollo New Member

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    America has over 100 years to transform its democracy and still it has fundamental problems. On the other hand it expects countries such as Guinea to become a democratic country on par with Europe in the period of a decade whilst at the same time subjecting it to neo-liberal economic reforms at the expense of not getting the necessery IMF loans if it isnt accepted.

    This smacks less of African cronyism then of dillusionary American dreams.
     
  3. dong20

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    Who mentioned America, or her dreams?

    This is less about democracy (never mind the US, many European nations have been democratic for centuries and they still can't get it right) and more about human nature. More specifically the failure of state institutions to curtail its worst excesses. A failing not unique to West Africa by any means, but Guinea is the example at hand.

    Guinea has been independent since 1958, and a 'notional' democracy since 1993 - where does this 'decade' to achieve a European style democracy originate?
     
  4. lipollo

    lipollo New Member

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    Democracy in its current form is synonomous with free-market neo-liberalist ideology. Have a look at Guinea's non-existent economic success and see where it stems from.
     
  5. ladsonbehr49

    ladsonbehr49 Member

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    I can see it now, the usa sticking our noses in their business and dumping money their way and I personally would rather have them rot than bail them out financial or anyother way. I am so tired of the us giving money and support to those nations that neither appreciate it or pay it back. Look at your history and see where our money has gone and no thanks or pay back.

    I can think of a few right now like somalia or genada or haiti..to me let them take care of their own and leave us alone. and stop coming over here with limit or no skills. my late father came from italy knowing 4 languages and learned english in a short time and had skills unlike most of the new immigrants that are flooding our shores...stay where you are and help your own country or die trying.

    thank you for reading.
     
  6. dong20

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    Neo-Liberalist ideology ... please. Democracy would likely mean 10 different things to the first 10 people you'd ask for their opinion on it.

    Guinea's economic woe's are rooted in three main areas; colonial legacy, systemic corruption/incompetence and a failure to compete effectively in a global market. This last factor is aside from and contingent upon market fluctuations, unfair trade policies by the west and so on.

    Ironcially, in recent years Guinea was one of few nations that managed to make some successful use of EU conditioning aid. This aid was a key factor in bringing the Conakry regime back to the table in 2005 (see article 96 of the Cononou Accord).

    Like many nations, in Africa and elsewhere it has squandered what was left if its post colonial inheritance. The reasons for this are many and varied but tend to have two things in common; avarice/corruption/nepotism and tribal division. However, in this case - unlike many others; Guinea has a strong sense of national identity so has been far less susceptible to tribal division than many of African nations.

    Regardless, beginning with Toure, it followed a socialist agenda, ruthlessly - until Conte seized power in 1984. He reversed the socialist agenda, but did little else, he certainly didn't reverse the economic and social failures it had wrought.

    My point being; economic failure didn't necessarily stem from either a socialist or 'neo-liberal ideology synonymous with democary' although both were fertile ground for embedding inefficiency and corruption. Both administrative systems have failed Guinea. That being the case - look at the commonality underlying both, throughout Guinea's independence and think again. It's almost a text book case.

    You need to spend time and look rather deeper before making cliché, sound-bite diagnoses.
     
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