College

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Kassokilleri2ff, Sep 13, 2007.

  1. Kassokilleri2ff

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    I joined the military so that they would pay for my college. BUT, im extremely lazy, and it will be very hard to work 10 hours a day, somtimes alot more, and go over to the desert every 4 months, and go to college at the same time. I will try to take maybe 1 class at a time. We shall see.

    My family is poor, there is no way in hell they could ever hope to pay for me, hell, i make more money now in the military as an e-3 than my parents make lol, thats pretty crappy.

    What i want to know, is lets say you are living on your own, how do you go to college? If you cant pay for it, how do you get it paid for? How do you live if your spending all your time doing college crap? Is it possible to go to school full time without having to keep a job? I don't know much about loans and stuff. Basicly what are my options?

    Is it possible for me to go to school full time somehow? Or am i doomed to have to keep a job untill i can get a degree, because if thats the case, ill probably never finish. What have you guys n gals done? what would you suggest for me maybe?
     
  2. B_henry miller

    B_henry miller New Member

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    You never know what the future holds. But many people have to work while they go to college. I'm in a similar position. I'm going to college full time, Monday through Friday, and working weekends. I'm not sure if I'll be able to quit my job.

    There is no one answer that fits all. Situations vary. Talk to a counselor at school or something. Keep asking questions.... :)
     
  3. MH07

    MH07 Member

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    First, trust me, you are not alone. Many have gone this same route before you.

    Go to the school of your choice (suggest a state-sponsored school or community college), talk with the Financial Aid department. They have counselors who deal specifically with this problem.

    Depending on your grades in HS and your situation, there are all kinds of financial aid available. I went to school working 3 jobs, with scholarships, grants, and loans, and I went to an expensive private university (why I couldn't settle for nearby excellent state schools :rolleyes:...) in the same state you reference in your profile.

    I had a Texas Tuition Equalization Grant, an academic scholarship for people with retail backgrounds from San Antonio (there are all kinds of restricted schollies like that), and a federally sponsored loan (which I paid off over 10 years). I worked as a waiter in a restaurant, had a paper route (yes I did), and worked in the school library. I always had at least one roommate and usually 3 or 4, and we lived in crappy student housing.

    I wouldn't trade those experiences for the world.

    If you're military (my dad was USAF) there are all sorts of OTHER financial aid from the dear old USGOVT. Also, there is a program (I know for a friend of mine participates in it) that provides college credit while serving on active duty (yes, in the desert). You go to class WHILE you're in Iraq. My friend is a college professor, spends his summers teaching in this program. He just got back from a Navy ship, where he taught English (for college credit for the students) while cruising the Far East. The credits are through an accredited TEXAS university, and are transferrable to any state school in Texas and most other states without difficulty.

    It can be done.
     
  4. smoothnfree

    smoothnfree New Member

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    Tried to get any grant money yet?
     
  5. dcwrestlefan

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    there are lots of options. but i had to commute 45 miles to school for a year after ronald reagan shut off the grants programs cuz i could not afford to live on campus. it was a dud, but it can be done.

    explore. you don't sound stupid. education will pay dividends for the rest of your life. highly recommend you go to college. low cost loans are available. for guys in the military, it should be easy.

    good luck.
     
  6. YourAvgGuy

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    Kassokiller,

    You do have tons of options.

    I don't know all the details of your parents financial situation, but if they were claiming you as a dependent and their resources are as limited as you say, then you should have received a hefty financial aid award (Pell Grant - $4,800 max, potential state grants offered through Texas, Work-Study, etc.). Did you complete the FASFA?

    Secondly, you need to search for scholarships. I trust you are academically strong, as there are numerous awards available for students within specific disciplines. You can search FastWeb: Scholarships, Financial Aid and Colleges to look for opportunities. Not all of these will be merit based; some will cater to specific things that donors mandate (targeted disciplines, geographical locations, disabilities, etc.). Check it out!

    Third, go to your university and talk with your Dean or Department head for your specific discipline. Many universities will offer scholarships for distinguished students who have done well academically, socially, etc. and have contributed back to the field.

    Fourth, do some independent research with a professor who is able to contribute $$$ to you to help off-set tuition. Professors are constantly securing grants to do research and are able to bring in students to assist. Not only does this give you money, but it makes you marketable in your area of interest. You have done research work with a professor (excellent on your resume, too).

    Lastly, loans. Again, you will have to complete the FASFA to be eligible for student loans. This would be a last resort (for me anyway). If you have to take out a loan make sure you get the unsubsidized loan where you will not have to repay until you complete your students and the interest does not incur.

    There is a lot of money out there for students; you just have to be proactive and agressively search and seek for it. Also, you will have to do some work (write essays, complete applications, collect transcripts, ask for letters of recommendation, etc) in securing these. Do not just look at how much $$$ these offer - rather check out the terms of the award, the complexity of the application and the eligibility requirements. If the award is $250 or $5,000 it is still worth you applying. Besides, those small awards add up a lot and help significantly.

    I've never had to pay to go to college. I was a full merit based scholar both for undergraduate and graduate school. In addition to receiving those scholarships, I also searched out other and ended up graduating from undergrad with $40,000 in my account.

    In a nut-shell... it is about persisentence, determination, scholarship and your work ethic in finding the money. You can do it!!!

    Good luck.
     
  7. Dave NoCal

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    I went to graduate school (the first time:rolleyes:) full time during the week and worked double shifts as a waiter at a middle-priced restaurant during the weekends. I drove an old but paid -for car, lived in inexpensive places, couch surfed for about three months at one point, ate as many of my meals as possible at the restaurant, and other things I don't quite recall. But... I borrowed no money and made it witha 3.87 gpa. It can be done as long as you are committed to the outcome.
     
  8. SpeedoGuy

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    I faced many of the same issues you did, kassol. They can be overcome with diligence and dedication.

    I lived in the dorms on the cheapy meal plan to save money. Resist the urge to rent an apartment off campus (= more expensive and more time consuming hassles).

    I carried a full academic load in the physical sciences while working 20 hours a week washing dishes in the cafeteria or shelving books in the library. I also was attending ROTC at a different campus.

    I painted houses during summer break, being forced to skip the expensive "travel and study overseas" opportunities many of my peers took during summer break. When I did short vacations at the end of each summer, I did cheapy fun things like backpacking or camping.

    I saved money by resisting the urge to indulge in the latest expensive fashion, music or techno fads. Yah, I endured some ridicule for not being hep to the latest trends at the time but so what.

    I rode a bike rather than drive a car to save on parking, insurance and gasoline costs. This is potentially a huge savings.

    Buy used books from the college or off-campus bookstore.

    Have some fun when possible but keep yourself busy and focused primarily on your academic work. That's why you are in college: not to party or slack off. I studied at least 40 hours a week outside of class time and worked 20 as well. It was hard and I was busy but, surprisingly, I found myself quite happy with the daily routine. The harder the work got, the more I rose to the challenge of staying focused. Time flew by rapidly and I graduated with high honors in a difficult physical science in 4 1/2 years.

    I look back at those busy years with pride. Despte being in my late teens and early 20s I had somehow mustered the dedication to really buckle down and work hard to achieve my goals. The payoff has been the satisfaction of having accomplished something worthwhile primarily through my own dedication and efforts.
     
  9. ClaireTalon

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    If you are lazy, and extremely so, that is your problem, and you should try to solve it.

    I went to college as ROTC cadet, and you should be prepared for 60 - 70-hour work weeks (while you're taking classes), and roughly 80-hour training weeks (during basic training, and officer training). There is no way around it, if you fail, being dumped from the ROTC list is what expects you. On the other hand, it surely pays off: I had nothing before my college years, and since then, I can look back on a pretty successful life. But, to say it in a religious figure: No cross, no crown.

    If it's the military side you have issues with, or you doubt your personal fitness to undergo the training and the ensuing serving, you should look for granted money. Scholarships or public funds, that is something I don't have any insight on, but at least there should be loans available. However, I can't imagine those are to finance your partying life, so check whether there are minimum requirements, minimum grades (at ERAU, you had to pass the first year at a GPA of 2.00 to go on pursuing your degree). And then you still have SpeedoGuy's advice: Look for a job that doesn't consume too much time to take your focus off the primary issue (academic advance), and use that to provide for your life.

    Head up, boy: I have been through the same situation, and I did survive it. It's a hard piece of work, but if you succeed, you can be really proud of yourself - and then you can have the blasting party.
     
  10. Notthe7

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    Kasso, I'm a full-time student that works part time. I pay for ALL of my own schooling which is typically right around 4,000 a semester. I've taken a few loans that were granted to me through FAFSA. If you haven't you have to fill one of those out. It's federal financial aide, most colleges make it a mandatory form you have to fill out. Based upon need they cna grant pell grants etc. I would suggest going to a financial aide conselor at your school.. doing that got me 2,000 in a pell grant among getting my loans subsidized [which means no interest (for awhile) ].

    My father is terminally ill and my mother doesn't work so that she can help him out. They live off social security checks etc. They are really great .. they let me live with them rent fee.. but other than that i pay for everything myself. I lived on my own for six months and between paying for bills, rent, and school i literally didn't eat [great diet, lost 20 lbs].

    It's a constant battle for us young college kids. There isn't enough funding for education and colleges are like any other business they just want your money.
     
  11. Kassokilleri2ff

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    When you go to get a loan, do they look at your highschool grades? I hope not. The only reason i passed high school is because i got high test grades. I never did homework or projects or anything other than pay attention in class and pass tests high enough to pass classes lol. As you can see i am very lazy, but, i have 4 years before i get out of the military, and starting to get this information now will help me for when i go back home and try to go to college. For now i know i can take a class here and there and the airforce will pay for it. But after that is why im asking this question. I guess ill have to call up some schools and start asking questions lol.
    I also have the mgib, which is about 32k that i can use for school after the military. Actually, they might have upped it to 64k, but im not sure. Anyways, how much school can that even get you? i heard like 1 year or 2. I forgot all about that one. But regardless, after 1 or 2 years ill still need some loans or whatever. So you can include in your load, a dorm and food and books and stuff? And i guess a part time job wouldn't hurt. Ive been working since i was 16 and i went to school (even tho i didnt study or hw or anything lol).
    Well i feel a little better, if i can get enough financial assistance to actually do it. ill look up that FAFSA thing too. well ty ty for the info :)
     
  12. ClaireTalon

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    Have you ever tried the Army College Extension program? Or isn't that up any longer? I admit the number of courses is a little low, but it might be a start.
     
  13. YourAvgGuy

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    If you attend a state-supported school, your GIB and stipend should be more than enough to cover your expenses. Additionally, there is a possibility that you will still be eligible for Federal Aid, too.

    Grades are so vitally important. They do not necessarily make a difference for funding, as long as you meet the school's mandatory eligibility GPA (which for most is a 2.0). However, you still have to get into the university, first....
     
  14. earllogjam

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    Seek out any free money out there, scholarships, grants, competitions...etc. Many are obsure and you need to do some sleuthing to find out about them. I got a few and they looked good on my resume and was a good experience on interviewing and how the system works.

    I was lucky to get a four year scholarship that paid for most of my college tuition. However, I did have to work to pay for my living expenses. I worked at a coffee house inside the law school - perfect job because it was slow and I got to eat a lot of my meals there - lots of toasted bagels with munster cheese and hummus. My first two years I lived in dorms which were actually more expensive than living off campus in my case. I lived in a commune type place my last two years, a shared Victorian house with about 15 other people. It was a bit rundown but fun and most importantly, cheap.

    There are lots of ways of saving and making money at college. I went to an Ivy League school back East and I would often just stay there for X-mas, spring and summer break and work odd campus jobs like catering reunions, working at the library, or being a research assistant for professors. I had friends who were resident advisors in dorms where they got their room free for working there. I know some friends who lived at home for 2 years taking transferable credit courses at a free community college and transfering into a state university junior year. If you really are a go getter you can finish college in 3 1/2 years, loading up on courses each semester. I worked in a hot shot corporation and did some recuiting and we would seek out these kind of go getters. The other route is to go to college at a cheaper state school, do well academically, live at home and try to get into a graduate program elsewhere.

    It has been my experience if you really want to go to college there are lots of people and organizations out there that are there to help you. The college I went to was very good in providing financial assistance based on need. I would not have been able to go there without financial assistance. It was a very demanding time and I have never worked as hard in my life. Everything afterwards has been cake in comparison.
     
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