Coming home to roost?

Discussion in 'Women's Issues' started by seahorses, Mar 14, 2008.

  1. seahorses

    seahorses Member

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    I don’t normally frequent this forum on LPSG, unless I’m researching and think the subject my have been topical here, but I’ve never become involved in any of the discussions; being unqualified and feeling I’d be intruding. However, the reason I write now regards a topic, ‘The pill,’ which helped influenced a decision I made back in the early 70’s.

    On a recent TV program here in the UK there was an article on breast cancer and the growing number of cases. The program’s doctor said that women over 50 were particularly at risk, hence the screening program and went on to say that one of the main contributing factors was lifestyle, including diet and the amount of exercise taken. Another factor was that woman over 50 produce more oestrogen.

    Looking back to the early 70’s there was a lot of controversy surrounding the pill with links made to thrombosis and other problems that affected woman, differently. Also, nobody knew of the long term implications for those taking the pill, or for future generations born after women, having taken the pill for some time, came off it to raise their families. Because these and other questions couldn’t be answered, or answered satisfactorily, I opted for a vasectomy. This was also new and revolutionary around that time, but at least I knew the only one being affected would be me and any problems resulting from the op were less severe. There was also ongoing contraception to be considered and it took the responsibility away from my wife, plus having fathered two fine children I felt moral obliged to have no more. In other words I was content, but couldn’t guarantee my wife wouldn't become broody while later holding some other’s new born and consequently, make a rash decision that might later be regretted!

    But I digress: The main constituent of the pill was oestrogen, they were loaded with it; one of the very things the good doctor said contributed to breast cancer, especially in the over 50’s who undoubtedly would have had access to the pill in the 70’s?

    Am I the only one to make this association, or am I deluding myself in order to justify my fears and subsequent actions all those years previous?
     
  2. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    No, it's true. However, like X-rays, the dosage in the early pill was much higher than it needed to be to effect contraception. Whether that high dosage reflects breast cancer rates, only published studies can say though the incidence of breast cancer in women under 40 makes me question if even a small amount isn't a good idea.
     
  3. JamieBoy

    JamieBoy New Member

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    Hope I'm not way-laying your OP, but sticking within the general theme (& being controversial....)

    The Coalition on Abortion / Breast Cancer

    "As of 2006, eight medical organizations recognize that abortion raises a woman's risk for breast cancer, independently of the risk of delaying the birth of a first child..."

    This really freaked me out.
     
  4. seahorses

    seahorses Member

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    You may well be right Jason, but as I previously questioned, what’s to say they haven’t a predisposition through their mother’s having previously taken those early forms of the pill?
     
  5. seahorses

    seahorses Member

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    Not at all Jamie, if anything your artical supports my arguement, because I believe the chemical processes triggerd in women having abortions, or taking the pill, are the same?
     
  6. dreamer20

    Gold Member

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    Which medical organizations are they?
    Presently a link between induced abortions and increased chances of getting breast cancer has yet to be confirmed. But it is known that a woman who carries a child to term and breast feeds the child reduces her chances of getting breast cancer.


    ACS :: What Causes Breast Cancer?
     
  7. D_Prudence_Admonition_Drightits

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    Well from a woman's point of view.

    I was put on birth control pills to help my severe menstrual periods.
    Then later I stayed on them for conception reasons of course.
    During that time, I saw my blood pressure continue to rise, never had a problem before with blood pressure until I began the pills. When I tried to get pregnant, I had many problems. All my test were always negative so I wondered if taking birth control pills had a hand in my future fertility problems?

    Now here I am with surgical menopause and having to take hormone replacement therapy. I am scared of my risk of breast cancer, but according to my doctor chances of breast cancer would only slightly increase to .00123% or some small number. Then working in the Cancer Center at times, I asked this of one of the oncologist. He said currently the studies have not shown an increase of breast cancer with those that are on HRT via the patches but an increase in osteoporosis.

    I don't know and I am still trying to find answers.
    Thanks for this post.
     
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