Damn vehicles.

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by conntom, Apr 5, 2010.

  1. conntom

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
    2,176
    Likes Received:
    146
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Boston (MA, US)
    I need to replace a fuel pump on one of my trucks.
     
  2. vince

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2007
    Messages:
    14,785
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    540
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Asia
    When they break down, or the ashtray is full, time to trade 'em in!
     
  3. conntom

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
    2,176
    Likes Received:
    146
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Boston (MA, US)
    Yea I know but mostly I can keep 'em going and it is paid off......property tax on them is very affordable now - and so is insurance.
     
  4. SpeedoMike

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2007
    Messages:
    2,940
    Likes Received:
    5
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    San Francisco Bay Area
    like NASA, use solid fuel.
     
  5. conntom

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
    2,176
    Likes Received:
    146
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Boston (MA, US)
    lol...yea....do they have solid anti-freeze too? I just walked by it and the stuff is all over the ground.

    Add that to the to-do list...
     
  6. Rikter8

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2005
    Messages:
    4,488
    Albums:
    3
    Likes Received:
    51
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    MI
    Year Make Model...

    It's not difficult to do. (And do so at your own risk taking necessary safety precautions)

    Get yourself:
    1. A new pump
    2. A new Gasket
    3. A new Pump lock flange
    4. A new fuel filter
    5. Well Ventillated area
    6. Safety Goggles
    7. Pair of large jack stands.

    1. Pump out or siphon out as much fuel as you can to make the tank light
    2. raise and support the trucks rear axle with high jack stands.
    3. Disconnect any EVAP canister lines, or fuel lines before moving the tank, including ground straps.
    4. Remove your gas cap, and three screws that hold the filler neck to the box side.
    5. Loosen the two strap bolts that hold the tank up.
    6. With support under the tank, remove the straps one by one. - IF YOUR STRAPS ARE RUSTY, NOW IS THE TIME TO REPLACE THEM.
    7. Lower the tank out of the vehicle, and disconnect any electrical connections.
    8. Wearing safety goggles, use compressed air to spray out any and all dirt and debris around the gas tank lock ring.
    9. Spray some rust eater like PB blaster on the locking ring.
    10. Use a hammer and punch to rotate the lock ring out of the locking position.
    11. If its good, you can re-use it. If its rusted..replace it with the new one you purchased.
    12. Carefully pull out the fuel pump, straight up and angle it to dump excess fuel and to get the fuel pump sender float out of the tank.
    13. Clean any dirt and debris out from the pump seal area.
    14. Put your new gasket on your new fuel pump, and snap on the float per the directions.
    15. Angle in and carefully lower your new pump/sending unit in the tank.
    16. Press down on the top of the fuel pump and re-attach the lock ring.
    17. Making sure nothing is binding, gently hammer the snap ring to rotate into locking position.
    18. Check the vehicle wiring harness to see if it is the same. Many GM sending units are not. You need to cut the vehicle harness and splice in the electrical pigtail if supplied. WHen using butt connectors, use Liquid electrical tape to seal the joint to prevent corrosion. Even better - use solder and then liquid electrictape the connection. Let dry - then cover in regular electrical tape. Pay attention to wire color and size. It's pretty easy.
    19. Once your connections are good, Position the tank back under the vehicle.
    20. Position the fuel filler hose so it will go into position easily.
    21. Lift the tank into position, and connect electrical connectors.
    22. Rotate the gas tank support strap into position and put one bolt in to hold it in place. Follow through with the second strap.
    23. Tighten straps once tank is in position.
    24. Re-attach filler neck bolts and cap.
    25. Re-attach any EVAP canister lines and fuel pump lines.
    26. Change your fuel filter - it should be along the side of the frame on most trucks/cars.
    27. Fill tank with gas.
    28. Cycle ignition on, but do not start the vehicle. Check for leaks.
    29. Cycle ignition a few times, but do not start. Check for leaks.
    30. Start vehicle and observe for any leakage.
    31. Lower the vehicle.

    Congrats, you just saved yourself about $500 in labor.
     
    #6 Rikter8, Apr 6, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2010
Draft saved Draft deleted