Decent Linux flavour?

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by ninerr, Jun 22, 2009.

  1. ninerr

    ninerr New Member

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    For those of you who saw my PC or Mac thread, one more thing -- with my old PC, I'm thinking of turning it into a Linux machine -- save it from Windows.

    I know how to use Unix from my previous research terms when I was in university, but I'm still looking for a Linux that looks decent and is easy to use (i.e. I don't have to spend 100 hours configuring it or finding drivers).

    Any ideas on that one too?
     
  2. dong20

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    Ubuntu, Debian, RedHat, Suse ... probably in that order - Suse is similar to RedHat.

    There's lots more, dozens. Knoppix is OK too, a Debian derivation, oh and Fedora. Ubuntu is perhaps the fastest, post install and perhaps my favourite, overall.
     
  3. Mr. Snakey

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    The open source network for Linux is simply amazing. It has become a viable alternative to Microsoft and will soon give Apple a run for its money. The choices are amazing. And it's free. I love the fact that you can build your own operating system. I'm doing that now. My favorites are Fedora 11, Slax, Ubuntu 9.04 and there is so much more. Go to their sites and download a live cd version . Burn a Iso image of it and that's it. You just pop the cd in and run a live verison from the cd or choose to install it. The choices are endless. I'm also interested in hearing from anyone who is into the open source network. I see in the not too distant future Microsoft and Apple sinking like a stone.
     
    #3 Mr. Snakey, Jun 22, 2009
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2009
  4. dong20

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    For the average user, Linux will need to become 'friendlier' and application compatible by an order of magnitude before that happens.

    But then, I suppose it depends on how one defines ... 'not too distant future'. One irony is that [in broad terms] Linux becomes more popular, the more 'Windows like' it becomes, as (one could argue) Windows becomes more 'Mac like'. At least on the surface. It's 'getting there', it may make it into the mainstream 'consumer' desktop marketplace, equally, it may not.

    Its main strengths are simply not those that are (currently) highly valued by mainstream users, or for the most part, corporate users ether. It has what, 4 or 5% market share, although that's increasing - but until that increase ramps up drastically in pace, 'zero' cost and such like notwithstanding, it will remain a [largely] 'hobbyist' OS.

    This year it has two major hurdles to overcome; new OS' from Windows and Mac. 2009 will be tough year for Linux, I think.
     
  5. Mr. Snakey

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    You are right. For the average user it may be a bit daunting. However with a little bit of learning it can be done. More and more computers are being made with a Linux operating system. So they are taking a bite out of Microsoft and Apple even though it is small . However it is increasing. Acer for one offers several laptops and desktops with Linux. So do others. It's just great as consumers that we have another alternative.
     
  6. dong20

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    True, but my point was the necessity of that 'learning' is what's keeping Linux where it is.

    In a few months, netbooks did more for Linux (and in the process scared the pants off Redmond) than years of incremental advancements in usability did, or would have. Microsoft fought back and for the most part, nailed that market too. Meanwhile Apple, as ever, missed yet another opportunity to edge themselves out of their own niche market.

    Ho hum ....
     
  7. Mr. Snakey

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    Oh i agree. I can't argue with that. I like it because it will keep Apple and Microsoft on their toes. There is another guy on the block now. They will have too offer consumers a good product. I just love the fact that i can pop a live cd in and surf the internet with a whole host of Linux operating systems. There are many too choose from.
     
  8. transformer_99

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    Word of caution, if you are looking for the eye candy of Compiz with Linux, Ubuntu 9.04 drivers no longer support many video cards for Compiz. nVidia and ATi have cut the support for those models. The open source driver may have support at a later date, but the reality is, even Linux is becoming more like Windows and OS X in that regard. This kind of shocked me, but a new version of xorg and the older video cards are very basic and pedestrian. OS X got to that even with it's hardware, 1st generation alluminum powerbooks don't support quartz and all it's features. Windows, now that's even better/funnier, there's a long list of video cards that flat out have no drivers for Vista, wait until the next version of Windows comes out. I'll bet even more hardware falls off the compatibility lists ?
     
  9. DiscoBoy

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    Gonna have to go with Ubuntu. I'm no computer whiz, but Ubuntu was easy enough to figure out. Very user-friendly.
     
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