Depressing job? Personal care workers, waiters top list

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Principessa, Oct 15, 2007.

  1. Principessa

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    Depressing job? Personal care workers, waiters top list
    By KEVIN FREKING
    Associated Press Writer
    Published on: 10/15/07
    WASHINGTON (AP) — People who tend to the elderly, change diapers and serve up food and drinks have the highest rates of depression among U.S. workers.

    Overall, 7 percent of full-time workers battled depression in the past year, according to a government report available Saturday.

    Women were more likely than men to have had a major bout of depression, and younger workers had higher rates of depression than their older colleagues.

    Almost 11 percent of personal care workers — which includes child care and helping the elderly and severely disabled with their daily needs — reported depression lasting two weeks or longer.

    During such episodes there is loss of interest and pleasure, and at least four other symptoms surface, including problems with sleep, eating, energy, concentration and self-image.

    Workers who prepare and serve food — cooks, bartenders, waiters and waitresses — had the second highest rate of depression among full-time employees at 10.3 percent.
    In a tie for third were health care workers and social workers at 9.6 percent.

    The lowest rate of depression, 4.3 percent, occurred in the job category that covers engineers, architects and surveyors.
    Government officials tracked depression within 21 major occupational categories. They combined data from 2004 through 2006 to estimate episodes of depression within the past year. That information came from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, which registers lifetime and past-year depression bouts.

    Depression leads to $30 billion to $44 billion in lost productivity annually, said the report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. The report was available Saturday on the agency's Web site at OAS Home: Alcohol, tobacco & drug abuse and mental health data from Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration(SAMHSA), Office of Applied Studies
    The various job categories tracked could be quite broad, with employees grouped in the same category seemingly having little in common.

    For example, one category included workers in the arts, media, entertainment and sports. In the personal care category, a worker caring for toddlers at a daycare center would have quite a different job from a nursing aide who helps an older person live at home rather than in a nursing home.
    Just working full-time would appear to be beneficial in preventing depression. The overall rate of depression for full-time workers, 7 percent, compares with the 12.7 percent rate registered by those who are unemployed.

    ———


    Read the report at: http://tinyurl.com/2ft37p
     
  2. sbeBen

    sbeBen New Member

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    It is now thought that many people get depressed or stressed due to work if they have a lack of decision making and controlling exactly what they do in their employment rather than the old school of thought where people who have high powered jobs cause the most stress and depression.

    From a personal view I can see that any type of care work can be or cause depression. I work in the Ambulance Service and I find some of my work causes my depression to worsen. Sometimes just the job in general affects me. It sounds harsh but I have to switch off sometimes. Some jobs I go to have had me in tears.
     
  3. Principessa

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    That's understandable. I admire people in your line of work. What you do is so very important, yet often unnoticed and definetely under valued.
     
  4. whatireallywant

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    Now see, this is why I never wanted to be a caregiver! (besides the fact that I'm just really not suited for it!) I've worked in caregiver jobs before, too. I know for a fact that I'm not suited for it! :eek:

    But I'm in that category with the highest rate of depression - the unemployed!

    HOWEVER... that may have a chance of changing sooner than I thought! I have an interview for a business analyst job on Thursday, have applied for a job at the employment office itself as a resource lab tech, and as part of applying for that job they gave me a typing test, to make sure I "know my way around the keyboard" (the job doesn't require fast typing), and it turns out that I type 50 wpm! That qualifies me for a bunch of data entry jobs that I had no idea I qualified for, because I didn't think I could type fast enough! Well, I can type fast enough for some of them, after all! (but for that I only want temp work - I want my permanent job to be in IT rather than data entry or something like that.)

    I think things are looking up for me, finally! I'll stay away from the personal care jobs and that sort of thing, though.
     
  5. sbeBen

    sbeBen New Member

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    Thanks njqt.:smile:. We have The National Health Service over here to which we all pay into and I also work for the NHS. I look at it like this: We are all potential patients so why do we get people saying "I pay your wages!" when the service does not meet their expectations. Also I can also never understand all the back stabbing that goes on with colleagues who are the ones that show off about how good they are at their job and how caring they are to patients. So I always think: Hmmm If I became your patient would you suddenly be nice to me?

    But what ever job type you have It can affect you in many ways. I guess mine is just an obvious job type that can be depressing or cause depression/add to ones depression.
     
  6. Mr. Snakey

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    Im back in retail and some brutesow with a wolf baby comes and the kid throws up and hoses down a cashier with vomit. John Carpenter would have been proud. depressing job yes.
     
  7. frizzle

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    McDonalds work tops that all off.
     
  8. B_Swimming Lad

    B_Swimming Lad New Member

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    Mines not exactly depressing. But it is fukin borin! I do lifeguarding and nobody ever drowns!! I just sit there and watch shitty swimmers splashing around.
     
  9. frizzle

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    What the fuck? How many women walk around in the bikinis there? You've got an ACE job!
     
  10. nudeyorker

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    I don't know what to say but I was a waiter during Law School and was pulling in about $500.00 a weekend ( this was several years ago) I was any thing but depressed. Tired from working double shifts...but not depressed!
     
  11. SensualGoth

    SensualGoth New Member

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    working in a call center where you are constantly bitched at because of your talk time , your sales, your calls and some managers using their power to belittle you and poke you while you are on a call. Some making fun of your disabilities Might as well go ahead and say it : JP MORGAN CHASE horrible company to work for.
     
  12. CUBE

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    Trust me when I say...teaching can suck the life out of you at times
     
  13. viking1

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    All jobs, and work itself is depressing, period...
     
  14. findfirefox

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    Agreed
     
  15. B_NineInchCock_160IQ

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    I've worked as a server. It wasn't that bad. I've had lots of jobs that were way more depressing.

    I've also volunteered at an old folk's home. That was gross.. but it wasn't depressing.
     
  16. B_NineInchCock_160IQ

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    Must agree, food service at any fast food place sucks. I've done that, too. Way worse than serving tables, unless you just hate interacting with people.

    I've had a lot of jobs.
     
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