DIY Projects

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by southernstud, Oct 3, 2010.

  1. southernstud

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    So, I was wondering, for those guys out there that didn't really have a "Do It Yourself" father growing up, where did you get started. I am talking generally. I am interested in home repair type stuff, but don't know where to get started, and I wasn't really afforded the opportunity to get into it growing up. So, fellows, where did you get your start on learning "how to"?
     
  2. unabear09

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    I had a dad like you described... I'm not mechanically inclined. Some things I can do and do well, but I have to be patient with myself and double check. I think my big issue is just having enough confidence to do the job correctly.

    What I have learned was learned primarily by watching years and years of home improvement shows. I can remember as a child, being bored. Well this was back in the day where all my family had was antena, so I was limited to watching ABC, NBC, CBS, PBS, and later Fox. Well, saturday afternoon and night television isn't really geared towards kids, so I would watch PBS from around 1pm until 11 or 12. I watched This Old House, Hometime (think thats what its called), not to mention Bob Ross, (lol) Sewing with Nancy, Are You Being Served?, etc. I can tell you how to do something, but its a rareity that I can do it myself.

    I accept that for what it is
     
  3. witch

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    gads!! my father was a danger to himself using a simple hammer, my mother was the fix-it one around the house
     
  4. b.c.

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    Being a do it yourselfer doesn't necessarily mean you had a father who was one. Sometimes it comes about out of a desire to tackle a job yourself, an economy of means, and/or out of necessity.

    You can start with simple things like painting, assembling furniture and cabinetry, installing new knobs on cabinet doors, etc.

    In automotive, it used to be easy to change one's own oil, or do a brake job if you were able to read directions in an auto repair manual. These days, with tightly packed engine components, emission control doohickeys, and computerized vehicles, the trade off in cost savings vs. the hassle isn't worth it.

    We've installed fencing (posts, runners, and boards), built a deck, laid down wood and ceramic flooring, tiled walls, put in insulation, strip molding, bathroom toilets, showers, kitchen sinks and disposals, hot water heaters, closet shelving, built in microwave ovens and dishwashers. With product manuals and online references one can usually figure it out. Beyond that is merely seeing it through.

    But one has to know one's limits. Jobs requiring a lot of manpower, special equipment or expertise is best left to the pros. This includes installation of driveways, walls and sheetrock, plumbing, roofing, and especially electrical wiring.
     
  5. B_stanmarsh14

    B_stanmarsh14 New Member

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    Most DIY stuff, I learned as "monkey see, monkey do" sort of way, and my main trade background, was carpets and flooring.

    Right now, one of my main hobby's, is repairing and maintaining classic fruit / slot machines, a number of which I have on my YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/stanmarsh14?feature=mhum#p/u

    Though I am colour blind, I never had much of an issue in the flooring trade, and also have done well with electronics, like with the classic slot repair, and the guys @ MPU Mecca have been a massive help in my subject: The MPU Mecca - Home

    Mind you, helps if you can join a web forum like LPSG, but focused on DIY subjects
     
  6. Rikter8

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    Tinker.

    For hardware stuff:
    Go to your local flea market or trade show, buy something cheap, and rip it apart.
    You'll learn how it came apart...and how to put it back together.
    Like an old push lawnmower.
    Today, it is easier than ever to learn via the web. There's tutorials on everything.
    I'm continuing to do tutorials on stuff online...its fun, informative, saves people cash...and keeps people more educated to take care of their stuff.

    Household stuff - Amazon.com used books... thousands of how-to books. I like the better homes and gardens stuff, but theres how-to books on every subject.

    God bless him, Dad wasn't the super handyman in the house. He had skills, but not refined. We learned together while he was alive. I tinkered a LOT with engines and cars. I now baffle co-workers minds fixing late models that they are fearful to open the hood.
    As a matter of fact....doing yet another co-workers auto repair now.
     
  7. Rikter8

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    Not always. I'm doing a $800 repair for $200 in my pocket.

    95-2009 When you think of engines...for the most part fairly basic. All the parts are nearly the same...just different shapes, sizes. Strip all the fuel injection off...all the hoses, etc... You still have a basic combustion engine. Crank...cam...lifters...intake manifold..flywheel...

    I believe everyone is capable...they just cant get past that mental block of fear of not being able to put it back together.

    Tip - when you remove a bolt, label it, or take a picture of where it went.
    Or...if possible, put the bolt back on the part and set it aside. Likewise with hoses.

    This is what I did a few weekends ago. Still test and tuning :)
     

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    #7 Rikter8, Oct 3, 2010
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2010
  8. conntom

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    It started at this part time job I had in high school. Some equipment would always break and I would hand tools to the guy who would usually fix it. Then is broke one day and he wasn't there. They sent me in. It didn't go well. I got shocked. But I did get it fixed.

    Then at home our water heater broke. I decided just to dive in. I hot the internet, grabbed some tools, bought some parts and I fixed it. AFter that I was off and runny.

    I fix just about anything now and do my oil changes and brake work on the car.

    Once I got a little confidence - I was off and running. Just did a whole bathroom remodel. Plumbing, carpentry, tiling - it came out nice. Takes me longer than a pro but it comes out sweet.
     
  9. Rikter8

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    Probably a good thread for this too..

    Appliance repair.
    Believe it or not... Sears parts Direct has exploded diagrams of many appliances (Not just Kenmore) on their website with parts.
    Download the diagrams.... Get the part numbers and shop around online for cost effective parts...
    I fixed my Rheem furnace burners. Plumbers wanted $500 to fix it. I bought new stainless steel burners for $120, and installed them myself.
    I used the exploded diagrams and measured the old orifaces, set the new burner to the same dimension, popped em in. I let the plumber do the adjustment and winter tune up for $100.
     
  10. B_stanmarsh14

    B_stanmarsh14 New Member

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    This is what I have done, with old slot machines, and e-bay is a godsend for cheep repair projects like this.

    Just acquired this from a fellow member @ MPU Mecca, that he spent some time on getting it to this standard....

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e5kRAbpc8DU

    Unfortunately, due to it's age, some of the art work has peeled / cracked, and this is the biggest problem faced with classic machine repair, especially when you get kitchen type flow tubes in the machine.

    Right now, I am trying to source some white paint, that will work on glass, and can take heat from being closely put near a bulb, and also need the paint to look slightaly aged (Like antique white, where it has gone slightly yellow), so it blends in well with the rest of the machine.
     
  11. SpeedoMike

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    necessity...
     
  12. nudeyorker

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    I grew up in a household with the opinion that you don't do what others can do as skilled craftsmen. I have however in the last few years been inspired by HGTV and have bought some books and taken some pointers from the people who do demonstrations at Home Depot. I'm quite impressed with some of the work that I've done if I may so so myslef. Still not touching anything to do with electricity though.
     
  13. alx

    alx
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    I done laboring for the summer so learnt loads.
     
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