Do old people need to die?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Drifterwood, Nov 24, 2008.

  1. Drifterwood

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    Messages:
    15,725
    Likes Received:
    388
    Location:
    Fingringhoe (GB)
    Please don't get upset by my style of headline writing.

    I just wonder how much the change of demographics in the West, particularly with regard to extended longevity and all its constituent effects, is affecting us.

    Free up housing demand, repay our debts through inheritance, fill up our treasuries with death duties etc etc. I know the Banks were planning on this.
     
    #1 Drifterwood, Nov 24, 2008
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2008
  2. exwhyzee

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2005
    Messages:
    4,578
    Likes Received:
    36
    Gender:
    Male
    I'm pretty sure we will all die. :rolleyes:

    I suppose it depends whether you see "seasoned citizens" as productive members of society or drains on our resources. Perhaps the challenge is looking beyond our traditional perception of elders as those who need to be placed in nursing homes, and instead, integrate elders with the whole of society so that their best talents can be used. Generally speaking, they are patient babysitters, they are wise councilors, they are prudent advisors, and deliberate workers (my father excluded :tongue:). So why would we want to ponder the need for their deaths?
     
  3. Gl3nn

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
    Messages:
    1,457
    Likes Received:
    2
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Somewhere in the universe
    Well, first of all: No.

    But I know where you are coming from. Here in Belgium old people take up a big part of the money. Social security...most goes to them (pensions, health, ...)

    I don't think I can count on a pension anymore. So saving is the message!
     
  4. B_mitchymo

    B_mitchymo New Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2008
    Messages:
    4,706
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Rugby, England
    I hope your not suggesting an influenza epidemic as a viable option for overcoming the credit crunch.....:)
     
  5. Principessa

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2006
    Messages:
    19,494
    Likes Received:
    28
    Gender:
    Female
    Do old people need to die?
    Yes, because we can prolong life; but not quality of life. What good is it to live to be 110 if all your friends and most of your family are dead? What about the physical, financial, and emotional burden to family caregivers? I don't like to think about it, but I understand that death is inevitable and necessary.
     
  6. D_Jared Padalicki

    D_Jared Padalicki Account Disabled

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2008
    Messages:
    8,104
    Likes Received:
    33
    What this man said, I don't want people to think later when I'm old that I have to die. So no, they don't need to die, but eventually will die.
     
  7. ZOS23xy

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2007
    Messages:
    5,073
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    directly above the center of the earth
    No, if you are pro- life and belive,, you should go forth and tell the dead people to get out of those coffins---Now!!!!


    (shamelessly swiped from Bill Hicks)
     
  8. B_starinvestor

    B_starinvestor New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2006
    Messages:
    4,409
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Midwest
    The baby boomer generation is the biggest demographic group in US history. Those on forms of public assistance, Medicaid/Medicare, Social Security, etc., represent a considerable wieght on government dollars.

    That being said, they are also the wealthiest generation ever, and a tremendous transfer of assets will occur over the next 10 - 20 years. Additionally, they have been more fiscally responsible than their children.

    Its plausable that this credit crisis will make current generations much more fiscally responsible for decades to come, and may ultimately be advantageous to the economic infrastructure of the global economy. Its highly unlikely that credit will ever be available, even fractionally, the way that it has for the past 8 years.
     
  9. houtx48

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2006
    Messages:
    7,095
    Likes Received:
    35
    Gender:
    Male
    did a governor from colorado once say something along same line and caught all kinds of shit for saying it, he was called governor gloom after that.
     
  10. 1BiGG1

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,977
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI

    Planning on accelerating the process for somebody that say …… has you in their will or someting? :tongue:
     
  11. Drifterwood

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    Messages:
    15,725
    Likes Received:
    388
    Location:
    Fingringhoe (GB)
    LOL - a few years ago, I realised that I was worth more dead than alive. I have sorted that :biggrin1:

    My point, is that the finance people plan many years in advance. They were planning on three score years and ten, not four score years and some and the "medical profession" taking all the old folk's savings. Maybe they have now decided to take it for themselves anyway. Amongst other things of course. We're not a patient lot. Patient - get it? :eek:

    Is it any surprise we have waiting lists when we call ourselves patients?
     
  12. b.c.

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2005
    Messages:
    9,307
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    1,687
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    at home
    Do old(er) people need to die? Well...need or not, we will...eventually. We ALL will. And you don't necessarily need to be "old" to do that.

    But hey, as one "baby boomer" I'd give you this advice: have a little more patience. All that shit that we've worked and busted or asses for all our lives will indeed eventually fall into your little laps...

    ...someday.
     
  13. Drifterwood

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    Messages:
    15,725
    Likes Received:
    388
    Location:
    Fingringhoe (GB)
    I'm no heir apparently, BC.

    Do you think the generation after you isn't working so hard?

    That's an honest question.
     
  14. ripsrips

    Verified Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2006
    Messages:
    668
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    28
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Central Coast, CA
    Verified:
    Photo
     
  15. b.c.

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2005
    Messages:
    9,307
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    1,687
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    at home
    I can't speak in generalities for the generation that came after, or for their prodigy for that matter. Some are working their asses off. And some are still working our asses off (lol).

    I have to admit though that I've had to rethink some assumptions I had made about the younger generation's ability to rise to the occasion and get involved when and where it really counted.

    By virtue of their vote they have proven they are able to rise to a cause, to an idea and to embrace it (and a candidate) on the basis of logic and principles... of the ideal itself, rather than fall for the usual rhetoric, bullshit, spin, and deception.

    In that regard alone they have turned out to be made of a whole lot better "stuff" than what some of us had feared... and overall have done us proud.

    So maybe all that effort (on our part) to steer them right and not fuck up in the same ways we did paid off...maybe while they were pretending not to listen to a thing we were saying they were listening all along....

    Nahhh. :rolleyes:
     
    #15 b.c., Nov 25, 2008
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2008
  16. D_Davy_Downspout

    D_Davy_Downspout Account Disabled

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2004
    Messages:
    1,144
    Likes Received:
    0
    It's like you live in some sort of alternate reality......
     
  17. D_Myer_Dogasflees

    D_Myer_Dogasflees New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2008
    Messages:
    495
    Likes Received:
    3
    NO, besides for the economics question in this thread. People don't need to die. Ignorant people do, yes, and if they think that dying is a tradition, then please leave them, we don't need anymore fools in this world.

    It would also be much more economically fortunate if people found a fountain of youth, if this had happened, the educated will be much larger in number, and the cost of educating the population would also be drastically lowered, as a much smaller fraction now are dependents. The educated would be much more educated, and there would be more educated, thus more wealth and a better life for all.
     
  18. D_Fiona_Farvel

    D_Fiona_Farvel Account Disabled

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2007
    Messages:
    3,790
    Likes Received:
    17
    I am biased because I feel the world is overpopulated, but, yes, I think humans should have a reasonable life span.

    Earlier this year, I read a report by, I believe, the U.S. DHHS that stated the U.S. has entered a period where for the first time, there are more people over 65 than five and under. I think that we are following the same trend as Europe and parts of Asia, where there is a very real issue with aging populations and lack of replacement population.

    Eventually, or actually, within a few decades, the elder population will be a drain on resources, particularly without a replacement workforce.

    Europeans are waiting longer to have children and producing fewer than in previous generations. I read the burgeoning replacement population is mostly immigrant; however, even immigrants are not producing enough children to mitigate the effects of an aging population on the state.

    The U.S. is not quite at that point due to a higher birth rate, but even that is bolstered by births to foreign-born people, which is something like 20% of all births in the U.S., and seems to show a decline in native birth rates. Which makes me think in 50 years we could have a 50%+ majority of the population over 50, and really be unable to support that shift.

    I’m not stating we should go all Soylent Green on people, but without death within a reasonable period, we need higher birth rates, to greatly raise the retirement age, and new industries to employ the large, multi-generational workforce. Without that a majority elder population will devastate the West.
     
  19. D_Aston Asstonne

    D_Aston Asstonne Account Disabled

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2006
    Messages:
    1,552
    Likes Received:
    12
    Death is a very neccessary part of life and many times the person is truly better off.For example..would anyone here wish to live on life support??
     
  20. b.c.

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2005
    Messages:
    9,307
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    1,687
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    at home
    lol...all this interesting rationalization of why "old" people "need to die".

    ...be interesting to read their take on the idea in, say...30 years or so, when people start referring to them as "old". lol
     
Draft saved Draft deleted