Do you know what you are saying?

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Drifterwood, Feb 18, 2011.

  1. Drifterwood

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    We have an expression "teaching someone to suck eggs". The meaning is that you are telling someone how to do something which is obvious or known to everyone. The irony is that most people don't know how to suck eggs anymore. So really the meaning should have come full circle, or do I mean 180 degrees?

    I am quite interested in the root of old expressions and especially those that are commonly used but we have generally forgotten where they came from and what they originally meant.

    Any examples?
     
  2. Not_Punny

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    Seeing as how it is no longer manufactured, I am amazed to see "Doesn't know shit from Shinola" still appearing in pop culture.

    Ah, shoot the shinola. I belatedly realized this"udderly failed to answer the OP.
     
    #2 Not_Punny, Feb 18, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2011
  3. Not_Punny

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    Sideline... uh, oh...I thought "sucking eggs" was inserting testes between my teethes....
     
  4. Bbucko

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    Earlier today I used the expression "long on the tooth": as one ages, one's gums recede due to gingivitis, making the teeth appear longer. It's no longer common, but even as I was typing it I wondered if anyone knew what the hell I meant (aside from the usual suspects).

    All too often I see "use" in place of "used", and it grates on my last gay nerve. "I use to believe that I knew how to write" is simply not correct and typing that is a sign of illiteracy.

    The weight of one's argument and one's ability to express oneself correctly (in correct English) are directly related, folks. I'm hardly a grammar Nazi, but when I see such glaring, obvious errors I wonder if anyone actually reads any more.
     
  5. superbot

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    "Long IN the tooth!"
     
  6. MarkLondon

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    Teaching your grandmother to suck eggs.
     
  7. Joll

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    Only just realised 'the daily grind' refers to grinding grain into flour to make bread, lol. :/
     
  8. borntobeking

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    I have alwasy been amused when we are slightly mistrustful of what a person tells us and we say that we take what they say "with a grain of salt". I am not quite sure where that came from.
     
  9. Drifterwood

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    My Grandmother didn't know how to boil an egg, let alone suck one. Don't you think that we have come to use it as an apology unless we are about to say something obvious to someone.


    Cum grano salis, itself a bit of a latin play on words. Salis, salt or wit, towit not taking things at face value or making things easier to swallow.
     
  10. nudeyorker

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    Much to the dismay of my partner and people I have worked with I use the term "Don't throw the baby out with the bath water." quite frequently. I overused the phrase during our home renovation last year.

    Throw out the baby with the bath water is an idiomatic expression used to suggest an avoidable error in which something good is eliminated when trying to get rid of something bad,[1] or in other words, rejecting the essential along with the inessential
     
  11. Drifterwood

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    By and large, you should cut and run when that is in the offing. :biggrin1:

    It's a great one Nudie, particularly given your work; I also use it all the time. Don't cut off your nose to spite your face.
     
  12. borntobeking

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    Gracias amigo:biggrin1:
     
  13. Drifterwood

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    I like the cut of your jib, wench, but you'd be biting off more than you could chew.
     
  14. superbot

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    "Ship shape and Bristol fashion!"
     
  15. vince

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    Every man and his dog knows that Drifterwood is on the up and up, no point keeping tabs on him.
     
  16. curious_angel

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    I think I'm getting your drift.
     
  17. Drifterwood

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    Tabs, as in the butt end of fags? :eek:

    You could take a carte blanche on that, save that curiosity might kill the cat.
     
  18. willow78

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    At the end of the day, it's swings and roundabouts and we're all none the wiser.
     
  19. vince

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    I feel like I'm the butt end of a joke that just flew over my head. :redface:
     
  20. crescendo69

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    A friend sent me this today:



    There is an old Hotel/Pub in Marble Arch, London , which used to have a gallows adjacent to it. Prisoners were taken to the gallows (after a fair trial of course) to be hung.

    The horse-drawn dray, carting the prisoner, was accompanied by an armed guard, who would stop the dray outside the pub and ask the prisoner if he would like ''ONE LAST DRINK''.

    If he said YES, it was referred to as ONE FOR THE ROAD.

    If he declined, that prisoner was ON THE WAGON.

    So there you go. More bleeding history.
    They used to use urine to tan animal skins, so families used to all pee in a pot and then once a day it was taken and sold to the tannery. If you had to do this to survive you were "piss poor", but worse than that were the really poor folk, who couldn't even afford to buy a pot, they "Didn't have a pot to piss in" and were the lowest of the low.
    The next time you are washing your hands and complain because the water temperature isn't just how you like it, think about how things used to be.
    Here are some facts about the 1500s:
    Most people got married in June, because they took their yearly bath in May and they still smelled pretty good by June. However, since they were starting to smell, brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odour. Hence the custom today of carrying a bouquet when getting married.
    Baths consisted of a big tub filled with hot water. The man of the house had the privilege of the nice clean water, then all the other sons and men, then the women and finally the children. Last of all the babies. By then the water was so dirty you could actually lose someone in it. Hence the saying, "Don't throw the baby out with the bath water!"
    Houses had thatched roofs, thick straw piled high, with no wood underneath. It was the only place for animals to get warm, so all the cats and other small animals (mice, bugs) lived in the roof. When it rained it became slippery and sometimes the animals would slip and fall off the roof. Hence the saying "It's raining cats and dogs."
    There was nothing to stop things from falling into the house. This posed a real problem in the bedroom, where bugs and other droppings could mess up your nice clean bed. Hence, a bed with big posts and a sheet hung over the top afforded some protection. That's how canopy beds came into existence.
    The floor was dirt. Only the wealthy had something other than dirt. Hence the saying, "dirt poor." The wealthy had slate floors that would get slippery in the winter when wet, so they spread thresh (straw) on floor to help keep their footing.
    As the winter wore on they added more thresh until, when you opened the door, it would all start slipping outside. A piece of wood was placed in the entrance-way. Hence: a thresh hold. (Getting quite an education, aren't you?)
    In those old days, they cooked in the kitchen with a big kettle that always hung over the fire. Every day they lit the fire and added things to the pot. They ate mostly vegetables and did not get much meat. They would eat the stew for dinner, leaving leftovers in the pot to get cold overnight, then start over the next day. Sometimes stew had food in it that had been there for quite a while. Hence the rhyme: ''Peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot, nine days old''.
    Sometimes they could obtain pork, which made them feel quite special. When visitors came over they would hang up their bacon, to show off. It was a sign of wealth that a man could, "Bring home the bacon." They would cut off a little to share with guests and would all sit around talking and ''chew the fat''.
    Those with money had plates made of pewter. Food with high acid content caused some of the lead to leach onto the food, causing lead poisoning and death. This happened most often with tomatoes, so for the next 400 years or so, tomatoes were considered poisonous.
    Bread was divided according to status. Workers got the burnt bottom of the loaf, the family got the middle, and guests got the top, or ''The Upper Crust''.
    Lead cups were used to drink ale or whisky. The combination would sometimes knock the imbibers out for a couple of days. Someone walking along the road would take them for dead and prepare them for burial. They were laid out on the kitchen table for a couple of days and the family would gather around and eat and drink and wait and see if they would wake up. Hence the custom of ''Holding a Wake''.
    England is old and small and the local folks started running out of places to bury people, so they would dig up coffins and would take the bones to a bone-house and reuse the grave. When reopening these coffins, 1 out of 25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the inside and they realised they had been burying people alive. So they would tie a string on the wrist of the corpse, thread it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell.
    Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night (the graveyard shift) to listen for the bell; thus someone could be, ''Saved by the Bell ''or was considered a ''Dead Ringer''
    And that's the truth.
    Now, whoever said history was boring ! ! !
    So .. . . get out there and educate someone! Share these facts with a friend, like I just did! !
     
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