double your gas mileage?

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by D_N Flay Table, Jun 28, 2007.

  1. D_N Flay Table

    D_N Flay Table New Member

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  2. SteveHd

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    Putting acetone in the gas looks problematic. The other suggestions would improve mileage but maybe not as much as he claimed.

    Was there a cat in the trunk?
     
  3. D_N Flay Table

    D_N Flay Table New Member

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    I am pretty sure it wasn't a "cat" but it looked like a car to me ;)
     
  4. snobbes

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    I just saw this thread in lates post on the rigthhand of this page, and it only said; Double your gas.......
    thats what happens every time I eat brussels sprout.
     
  5. ClaireTalon

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    Yes, there was one. I suppose releasing it is a way to reduce the amount of useless junk you always keep on your backseat and trunk.

    Acetone is used as an additive to normal gasoline, but only at a ratio of 1:5,000 - so for a tank filling of 20 gal, you'd have to add less than half an ounce. If does support the combustion, increasing the efficiency of it, so more energy could be gained from an amount of fuel burnt. But this improve of energy efficiency is easily wasted again by not driving sensibly.
     
  6. dreamer20

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    I'm disappointed. Where was the nudity?:tongue:


    Has anyone won the prize yet Claire?:confused:
     
  7. SpeedoGuy

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    How about simply driving half as much?
     
  8. Biggie77

    Biggie77 New Member

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    Being a chemist, I would have to say use extreme caution with acetone. It can eat lines that normal gasoline won't harm. Also, try spilling some on your paint-job. Other additives include methanol which simply dehydrates the gas some (i.e., Heet). Good driving practices will do far more for your mileage than additives.

    All the gas comes through a few mainlines in the states, so the difference between Shell and say Speedway or Casey's is minimal. Shell often adds a quart of special joy juice to an entire tanker saying it improves their fuels. Doubtful. The ratio would be 20,000:1 or even 25,000:1, depending on the tanker size.
     
  9. viking1

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    Exactly.
     
  10. ClaireTalon

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    You'll find nudity if you look at the video of the Puerto Rican pop starlet screwing. She looks about as interested in that guy as if she had seen a dick too many to make sex interesting for her.

    Two or three members have been remarkably close to the truth, but they both failed to recognize the last, decisive link between my nick and myself. So, only booby prizes for both of them :tongue:.

    On the original subject, I must say that I agree with Biggie: Sensible driving will help you more than experimenting with additives, or maybe using dubious gizmos that you can purchase on the net. Take your foot off the pedal while the traffic lights are still far ahead instead of speeding at them, drive higher gears whenever possible, and instead of shifting down to neutral when you have to wait somewhere, use your clutch to interrupt traction. Just a few tips, there are a lot more.
     
  11. Biggie77

    Biggie77 New Member

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    I receive a inexpensive tool catalog (Harbor Freight) that has some good deals, but they sell a magnetic gizmo that straps on your fuel line. It supposedly breaks up hydrocarbons. Well, um, gasoline is a hydrocarbon. Even if they meant bigger aromatic or chained hydrocarbons, the magic of magnetics is going to do nothing to eliminate them. Just my thought for the moment.
     
  12. viking1

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    None of these things work and are complete rip off.
     
  13. Rikter8

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    Larger displacement engines.

    More power = less work the engine has to do = better gas mileage.

    My co-workers B Car (95 Caprice RWD with a 300hp LT1) gets around 25-28mpg, and my 96 Firebird LT1 got about the same.

    Putting an undersized engine in cars just makes them work harder, and your foot is always in the pedal.

    "Theres No Replacement for Cubic Displacement"

    :biggrin1: :drive:
     
  14. dong20

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    If only it were so simple.:rolleyes:
     
  15. Biggie77

    Biggie77 New Member

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    Rikter8 is exactly correct. Scaling it up some, the big diesel semi's can get 5-7 miles to the gallon which is excellent considering they can legally weigh up to 80,000 lbs. A Ford Excursion (discontinued, damn :rolleyes:) with a V10 gets 8-10 mpg if you are lucky. Of course good diesel fuel is more efficient, anyway.

    When training for my CDL (yes, I have one of those, too), I learned how to be easy on the clutch and shifting. Double clutching is an artform and once you get it, it's like butter.
     
  16. viking1

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    An over worked engine will always get poor mileage. Weight, gearing, and the engines operating range all play a part.

    Diesel is considerably more efficient. Just look at the EGT as compared to a gasoline engine, and you can see how much less energy is wasted out the exhaust.

    Yep, once you learn to shift an unsyncronized gear box it's no problem.
     
  17. SteveHd

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    Always? I/M/O the reverse is more likely to be true. I think an "overworked" engine would get better mileage. But I'm not an engineer so I don't really know.

    Here's my thinking: Most of the time the engine isn't really working hard. A larger engine will have it easier, all other things being equal, but it consumes more fuel simply because it's larger. There's more air being drawn into larger cylinders and so more fuel goes in with that. At the times when the car is at a steady speed, say 40mph, either engine will be "loafing" but the larger one will be consuming more fuel. It's pumping more air/fuel through those larger cylinders. Even when both are idling, the larger engine will consume more fuel.

    In the "real" world, it's a minor difference. Using the 95 Caprice mentioned previously, suppose we replace its engine with a 5.0 V8 TPI. [I specify "TPI" because the 5.7 "LT1" was also a tuned port induction design.] To keep all things equal a 150 lbs of deadweight would have to be added because the 5.7 is 150lbs heavier than the 5.0TPI. With those changes the improvement might be less than 1 mpg. Omit the "deadweight" and the improvement would be fractionally better.

    The bigger factors are size and weight, anyway.
    Are there "unsynchronized" gearboxes being sold? I mean unsynchronized for gears above first. I thought such gearboxes fell out-of-favor before WW-II.:smile:
     
  18. dongalong

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  19. SteveHd

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    dongalong, some of those look plausible, others suspect.

    That guy's original 17 mpg was suspiciously low. I have a 1995 Seville that gets ~16 in the city. And it's a bigger car with a much bigger engine.
     
  20. viking1

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    Notice I said overworked...not properly sized for the task. I have seen too many guys buy a pickup with the smallest engine available. Only to get less mileage that the bigger engines due to it being overworked. This is especially true when towing or driving in the mountains. I do live in a mountainous area. The same goes for gearing. More gear reduction doesn't always mean less fuel mileage. Too big of an engine for the task will also get poorer mileage.

    I was talking about heavy trucks with the unsynchronized gear boxes. It was in response to Biggie77 talking about learning to double clutch during his training to be a commercial driver.

    The vast majority of "add on fuel saving devices" are a gimmick. Some of that stuff like special spark plugs or injectors may work. I doubt that it would even be enough to notice, though.
     
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