Drinking and stomach problems

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by dannyrankin, Jun 6, 2010.

  1. dannyrankin

    dannyrankin New Member

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    I tend to eat pretty healthy, but when I'm out drinking a lot of beer, vodka or whiskey, I tend to pig out late at night, eating unhealthy crap right before I go to bed--which I know isn't the best dieting habit. I don't always do this, but it seems like more often than not I'll be having some stomach problems following a day of drinking. What do you guys to avoid or help with this?
     
  2. Deno

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    Don't drink. Why worry about eating healthy and then poison your body with these toxins.
     
  3. nudeyorker

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    It's pretty simple really, avoid eating the things that upset your stomach. If you are going out to party start on a fairly full stomach and you most likely won't eat the things later that cause the problems.
     
  4. HiddenLacey

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    I agree stop drinking, but if you are going to drink make sure you have eaten a good meal before hand so that it is easier on your stomach.
     
  5. Mr. Snakey

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    Things such as vodka and whiskey in large amounts will destroy your stomach and your health. It has nothing to do with what your eating. To avoid this, stop while you still have a chance.
     
  6. petite

    petite New Member

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    I've suffer from ulcers for longer than you can imagine and have found that the best drink for my sensitive stomach is vodka with grapefruit juice. Kefir the next morning should help to regulate the acid balance and soothe your stomach. Sure it tastes 'thick' and yogurt-like so make a smoothie out of it with some frozen blueberries, or a banana and some frozen strawberries.

    Take N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) or glutathione before drinking and before bed with a full glass of water to protect your liver and your brain from acetaldehyde poisoning. If you've drunk a lot the night before and have a headache or still feel a little drunk, take some the next morning also. Stay hydrated. It will help your stomach, liver, and brain.

    SpringerLink - Journal Article

    Never ever take acetaminophen if you've been consuming alcohol or the day after a binge. Many people end up in the ER because of this mistake. It can kill you. It can induce 'alcohol poisoning' even though it's been more than 12 hours since you've drunk any alcohol.*



    * At least the exact same effects, so what's the real difference?
     
    #6 petite, Jun 6, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2010
  7. dannyrankin

    dannyrankin New Member

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    Thanks, petite. I'll remember your advice for next weekend!
     
  8. Meniscus

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    petite's suggestions are interesting and worth a try, although I'm surprised that something as acidic as grapefruit juice would be good for a sensitive stomach, especially when combined with vodka!

    I have a friend who recommends taking a potassium supplement after drinking to prevent hangovers, although I think it depends on how drunk you are in the first place. I have tried it, along with plenty of water and an ibuprofen, and the combination seems to help. I'll also try to eat a little something before going to bed, like a banana, toast, crackers, a bowl of cereal, or an English muffin.
     
  9. petite

    petite New Member

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    It's counterintuitive, but the stomach is supposed to be acidic. A big mistake a lot of people make is trying to raise the pH of their stomach with antacids, which causes an overproduction of acid in the long run. It's a positive feedback loop that increases one's stomach acidity over time.

    I have never heard of potassium affecting a hangover before. Alright, I just looked it up and it suggests that replenishing electrolytes will help a hangover. That's the only thing I could think of also. Yes, Gatorade will help, but not as much as NAC or glutathione.

    Trust me on the NAC or glutatione. The NAC or glutathione will prevent hangovers. I'm too lazy to explain the metabolic pathway of alcohol metabolism and how it produces acetaldehyde and how NAC or glutathione prevent acetaldehyde toxicity and how acetaldehyde is the toxin responsible for giving you a headache and causes cirrhosis of the liver and brain damage. Just trust me. NAC is what they'll give you in an IV if you drink too much and end up in the ER, because it will save your life. It saves your life the same way it will prevent the hangovers.

    I actually recommend glutatione over NAC, though because too much NAC gives you stinky farts and glutatione will not. Your body metabolizes both quickly, so you can't take a large dose all at once and have it be effective, which is why I suggest once before you begin drinking, once before bed, and maybe once the next morning. Too much all at once and you'll just have gas. If you feel like you need more, spread your doses out. Take it once an hour, or once every two hours.

    Too much of either one will deplete certain minerals which act as co-factors, such as copper and selenium. If you plan on drinking very frequently or taking NAC or glutathione frequently, you may want to add a mineral supplement.

    I would also add that you should resist adding sugars or sweet liqueurs to the grapefruit juice and vodka, because that will irritate your stomach. I personally like the taste of grapefruit juice and vodka.
     
  10. tripod

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    The potassium is for electrolyte replenishment. In an effort to remove the alcohol from the system, more fluids are secreted than normal which can lead to ionic mineral depletion. Ionic mineral depletion can have numerous deleterious effects on the body. Electrolyte deficiencies can cause drastic changes of the GIs alkaline balance.

    This one of the main reasons for alcohol related ulcers... a change in the environment of the gastric system's PH which could lead to a decreased immune response to H.pylori and other similar pathogens.

    Petite's probiotic advice is RIGHT on track. Kefir contains LARGE amounts of calcium, magnesium, zinc and the aforementioned POTASSIUM. Most drunken meals contain large amounts of sodium, so that base is usually covered. lol! That's not even counting all of the tiny little friends that you will introduce to your GI that will compete with pathogenic strains of bacteria that have taken advantage of the effects of too much alcohol.

    It's all about the minerals baby... but it's really about PH. Fluid replenishment makes it all possible and is necessary to restore cellular turgor and extracellular pressure so that the vascular system can return to it's former levels. Headaches begone. :wink:

    Puking just makes the problems even more acute I'm afraid.
     
  11. petite

    petite New Member

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    Tripod, I think the acidity of kefir mattered with my stomach ulcers. One of the reasons why I decided to try kefir in the first place is because it is more acidic than yogurt or milk, both of which raised the pH level of my stomach too high when I tried using them to kill the burn of my stomach ulcer. I believe they caused the positive feedback loop where my stomach become more acidic than before once it tried re-regulating the pH back down again. Being more acidic, as well as possessing probiotic bacteria, kefir worked for my ulcer problem.

    He isn't actually suffering from ulcers, but I honestly believe that it would work better than using an antacid the next morning. Much better!
     
  12. vince

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    About Kefir-

    For the last three months I've been having some bad acid reflux and gas pains. It burns like shit. As a result of Tripod's other thread about bacteria, I tracked down kefir and found it available everywhere in Turkey. The stuff works like a dream. The acid stomach got better immediately and actually seems to have cleared up because I haven't drunk any kefir in a week and the symptoms have not returned.

    thanks Tripod for starting that thread and making me think about pro-biotics.
     
  13. Meniscus

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    There's a local farm which has a store which sells their own crops plus the crops of other local farmers. For some strange reason, they also carry a lot of Turkish products (cookies and candies and jars of...stuff). I know I've seen Kefir there so I'm going to stop by tomorrow and get some.
     
  14. slurper_la

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    4 posts suggest dietary control and curbing your drinking but you reflect on Petite's singular suggestion of how to treat the symptoms in time for next weekend?

    We can see your intent here. You have your band-aid now go out and play. Hopefully you'll listen to others before you kill your liver or stomach lining.
     
  15. D_MisterBater

    D_MisterBater New Member

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    have a substantial meal before drinking. lots of water while getting sloshed.
     
  16. petite

    petite New Member

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    You're welcome! That was my post about kefir curing my ulcers!
     
    #16 petite, Jun 8, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2010
  17. petite

    petite New Member

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    Aw, give the guy a break! I'm a very health conscious person, but that doesn't mean that I don't indulge either. I just know enough about biochemistry to indulge safely and minimize the harmful effects.

    I advocate healthy living, but I also advocate having fun sometimes!

    Moderation in everything, even virtue. :smile:
     
    #17 petite, Jun 8, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2010
  18. helgaleena

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    I have to agree with all the advice in this post. And here is some more info on ulcers: Sauerkraut and fresh cabbage juice are both beneficial against the bacteria, H. pylori, which cause stomach ulcers. Try to add them to your diet and get your intestinal tract used to them, as well as to the probiotics such as those in cultured milk products like kefir, yogurt, and buttermilk.
     
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