eggcorns

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by B_Stronzo, Sep 29, 2006.

  1. B_Stronzo

    B_Stronzo New Member

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    Yes eggcorns. See forth paragraph in the link to see how the word was coined.

    It's a "spell-as-you-speak error".

    The eggcorn I find more and more prevalent and less and less tolerable to my sensiblities is:

    the erroneous "supposably" for the proper "supposedly"

    My mum has a friend who says "but the woman has very, very, very close veins". I swear it's true. I've heard it.
     
  2. fortiesfun

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    I have a president who says "nuculer."
     
  3. B_Stronzo

    B_Stronzo New Member

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    I do too fortiesfun.

    Maybe he "should of":cool: never been voted into office.

    Or as the Elton John song lyric goes:

    "Hold me closer, Tony Danza...."
     
  4. DC_DEEP

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    Stronzo, I have no clue why you always get yore pan-tease in a wad. Who cares if some pee-pull supposably don't difference.
     
  5. B_Stronzo

    B_Stronzo New Member

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    Beecuz sum peepel reely go disprespectin this kween's ingalish.:cool:
     
  6. Pecker

    Pecker Retired Moderator
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    When I get finished over here I'm going oh ver. (over there)
     
  7. Hatched69

    Hatched69 Member

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  8. jakeatolla

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    Yes and look what happened to Dan Quayle for spelling potatoe with an e at
    the end .
     
  9. B_Stronzo

    B_Stronzo New Member

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    :eek: ................. now that was a fun read. I'd best nawt be hearin' no one tawkin' like that tho...


    Also-

    Still wish there was an absolute way to pronounce "pecan".

    I grew up NOT IN THE SOUTH ... and I was taught to say "PEE' can"... not "pa CAWN". The latter I was told is an affectation.
     
  10. Pecker

    Pecker Retired Moderator
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    jewlery / jewelry
     
  11. Pecker

    Pecker Retired Moderator
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    chimley / chimney
     
  12. D_Gunther Snotpole

    D_Gunther Snotpole Account Disabled

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    ...one horse soap and sleigh ...
    Jingle bells, jingle ...
     
  13. rawbone8

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    ash-fault
     
  14. Pecker

    Pecker Retired Moderator
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    I'll go where you want me to go, dear Lord
    Over mountain or playin' horsie.
     
  15. DC_DEEP

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    A bit humorous, even if slightly off-topic. The thread isn't about accents, it's about near-phonetic spellings people use for their blatantly mis-pronounced words. Some of those on that website, I have actually heard... but I have never known of any southerners who spell "hard" as "hod."
     
  16. D_Sheffield Thongbynder

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    This is defiantly an interesting thread. (Spell check sucks)
     
  17. DC_DEEP

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    Careful, sweet-cheeks, some of those are the same in Boston or Atlanta... "Park the car" for example... :smile:

    And as for that delectable nut you mention, it is a southern tree. I grew up calling it, and hearing it called, "pe-CAWN." The first time I hear someone call it "PEE-can", I thought "Don't they have indoor plumbing up north? Why would he have to pee in a can?" It's not an affectation, I think I would trust the pronunciation of the locals where the tree grows. Now go get your one-horse soap, and SLAY!
     
  18. fortiesfun

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    Is it an AW-fect-TAW-shun to say "pe-Cawn?" In Awtlawntaw it is. In Boston, it's okay. Alls I know, boy howdy, is that in San Saba, Texas, where the mother tree grows, it is simply heresy.
     
  19. D_alex8

    D_alex8 Member

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    It's jewellery, oh proponent of American-spelt corruptions of the English language! :rolleyes: :biggrin1:

    As regards so-called "spell-as-you-speak" types of word alteration, let's not forget, though, that there are countless examples of words that have become accepted as standard, 'correct' usage despite such origins.

    Simply by way of a couple of examples...

    Numerous nouns have lost an opening 'n' due to misdivision of syllables; the three most celebrated examples being "a nadder" (originally from the Gothic nadrs), "a napron" (from the Old French naperon), and "a numpire" (from the Old French nonper), which fairly long-established English forms were corrupted in late Middle and early Modern English into "an adder", "an apron", and "an umpire" through people dividing up the syllables incorrectly when converting what they had heard into written form.

    And, of course, there are numerous examples of assimilation to existing norms within words borrowed from other languages. Thus, although the word "crevis" (from the Old French crevice) was used perfectly happily for a good while, common misprounciation of it through assimilation to vocabulary relating to other water-dwelling creatures eventually turned it into a "crayfish" or "crawfish", despite the fact that it clearly is not a fish at all. :rolleyes:

    So, annoying as the phenomenon may initially seem, there are enough examples of its influence on accepted contemporary English usage as to provide a strong historical precedent for it as an active factor in lexicographical evolution. Indeed, the OED has recently added a footnote about the use of "your" for "you're" (based on people writing what they hear rather than analyzing the contextual grammar), stating that the "incorrect" usage is so commonplace as to have perhaps earned a certain amount of validity for future consideration as a contested yet acceptable variant form. :eek: :rolleyes: See, I knew you'd be pleased to hear about that, Stronzo! :cool:
     
  20. Lordpendragon

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    I favour humourous behaviour.

    Having said that, I got my knickers in a twist when spelling bureaucrat the other day. I had a blind spot, maybe I am a little lisdexic?
     
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