Events in Nepal

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by swordfishME, May 28, 2008.

  1. swordfishME

    swordfishME Member

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    Nepal abolishes monarchy after 239 years of rule - CNN.com


    Nepal has declared itself a republic and abolished the 239-year old rule of the Shah dynasty.

    King Gaynendra has been given 15 days to vacate the Royal Palace and move to his private home in Khatmandu.

    Is this just an isolated incident given the unpoularity of Nepal's King and Crown Prince of should other royals around the world be packing their bags?
     
  2. Industrialsize

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    This is old news. nepal abolished the monarchy about 2 years ago. They changed the name of the coun try from"The royal Kingdom of Nepal" to Nepal. The national airline from royal Nepali Airlines. to Nepali Airlines. They were just giving the kin g and his family time to gather themselves and vacate. (I've been there 6 times)
     
  3. swordfishME

    swordfishME Member

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    The declared the republic today. The king was still head of state and Nepal and official monarchy until TODAY. The legal action by the elected constituent assembly that needed to happen to offically end the monarchy could not have happend until yesterday when they officially took their oath of office. Try reading about the news for a change.
     
  4. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    If Gyanendra is smart, he'll leave the country.

    Neither China nor India are remotely happy about what is going on in Nepal. Because of its strategic position as a buffer state between the two giants, a peaceful, neutral, Nepal would best suit the interests of both sides. Instead, they've got a bunch of Maoist rebels running the government and Maoists aren't known for moderate policies. This was really India's game to lose as the monarchy was always friendly to India, yet throughout the revolution, India did nothing to stem it. The result is that India is left without an ally and both India and China now have a huge question mark on their borders.

    What will happen if Nepal goes the way of Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge? What if the new government fails to create a viable state? Any destabilizing situation that causes Nepal to lean too heavily toward one of the two nations on her borders could cause one of the giants to invade, and that would escalate tensions. The more conservative members of India's government see shades of Tibet in their peripheral vision and worry about a possible Chinese, "liberation," of Nepal.

    This has been a debacle on all sides. The UN, China, India, and the west have done nothing to assure a viable Nepali state. Maoism hasn't proved itself a tenable form of government for any length of time, and any move by India or China to stabilize the country would be construed as threatening by the other. This is a bad situation and history has shown it usually gets much worse.

    I'm immensely displeased that the US has ignored the Nepali situation for so long because it's in our interests to have a neutral, weak, Nepal if only not to inflame tensions between India and China.
     
  5. dong20

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    You may want to rethink the timeline and theme of that commentary.

    After assuming absolute authority in a 2005 coup - King Gyanendra stood down from direct political rule in spring 2006, or rather he was forced to - but that's not abolition. His powers were curtailed and he was made accountable to parliament. The fate of the royal family then hung in the balance for a year or so while a new constitution was formulated - sans monarchy as it turned out.

    The formal decision to abolish the monarchy was originally to be put to a popular vote after a general election but an in principal political decision to do so was taken about six months ago. Maoist rebels having already pulled out of the government because their demands for abolition were not met. That was the pay off.

    While it wasn't a 'popular' vote (in that sense, it seems popular in most others), it was a follow on from the April General election won by the Maoists and today's assembly decision effectively rubber stamped the earlier one and thus the king has been given a fortnight to vacate, from today (15 days actually) or risk forceful eviction - that's not much time to 'gather themselves'.

    Still, he did promise to make Nepal a democracy within three years of the 2005 coup, so that part worked out. The national anthem, was or will also (be) changed I believe, to remove royal references. He must have seen the writing on the wall this last two years, so perhaps that's what you meant. Otherwise I'm not sure how having been there six times is relevant, if you don't pay attention.:tongue:

    I doubt he'll have any choice. I share your concerns for the future.
     
  6. swordfishME

    swordfishME Member

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    Every political commentator in Asia thinks this is a disaster. The Monarchy had some serious flaws (in the person of the Sovereign and the heir) but having the Maoists run the country is not acceptable to anyone.

    I am really surprised that India did not step in and try to resolve the issue (they had invaded to restore the rightful monarch back on the throne) in the early 50's.

    I do think that the situation in Nepal is going to get a lot, lot worse before it gets better. I am not so sure that it will lead to another restoration of the monarchy though (I am sure Gyanendra would love that).




    That is just his way of trying to establish himself as an authority on any given subject. :smile:
     
  7. Industrialsize

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    I was a mountaineer in Nepal during that time going back and forth from the USA. We always had to keep an eye on the political situation before we arrived. This was from 1999-present time. We used to rely on the 2 websites posted above to see where the maoists were. I was stopped twice in the mountains by a group of maoists and we were "asked" for a donation. About 100 dollars. For that we received a written receipt as safe passage from future extortion by other maoists.
    . It was a power struggle between the monarchy and the maoists. At one point the king seized all cellular lines and the interent. It was a crazy time. I'm having a hard time believing they are all making nice now.
     
  8. TinyPrincess

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    Nope - this is actually a popular King stepping down for democracy although the majority of the parties and the people wanted him to stay on before China destroys the country.
     
  9. Industrialsize

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    I'm afraid you don't know Nepal very well. King gyanendra is reviled by the people of nepal and the only reason he left is that he was forced out. His Bother, King birendra, who was killed in the royal massacre was revered.
    I was in Nepal extensively during the Maoist uprising and the royal Massacre. I would like to speak with citizens of khatmandu and see what they think. Regular Maoist Bandhs(strikes) were a way of life for the people of this city, yet their lives were minimally interrupted.
    Then I would like to visit the rural and mountainous parts of this country and see what these people think. There is absolutely no infrastructure in this country and the people of the mountains live in their own worlds,desparately poor and happy. It was the rural areas of Nepal that the Maoists control and routinely murder scores of villagers. I'd like some reporting on the state of this part of the country. My guess is that nothing has changed.
     
  10. dong20

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    0/10 for accuracy on the King's popularity (or you're confusing Nepal with Bhutan), 10/10 for worrying about China, although I agree with Industrial, the immediate thread is probably closer to home.:cool:
     
  11. Rubenesque

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    Blimey - hope we don't follow trend... can't quite see Her Maj working the checkout in Tesco!
     
  12. B_Artful Dodger

    B_Artful Dodger New Member

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    The Royal Houses of European nations are very safe. They need not worry at all. However others may not be in such comfortable positions. I uderstand the popularity of the King of Jordan for example, is waning.
     
  13. TinyPrincess

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    Me being confused again... :frown1: Was thinking of Bhutan...

    Totally agree on the China part.
     
  14. dong20

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    Yes, Bhutan's Royal family is widely revered - I posted a thread about the elections a while back. Of course with Government policy embracing the concept of national happiness, who can be surprised! :biggrin1:
     
  15. TinyPrincess

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    Could be an idea in the US - can you imagine Obama and McCain discussing national happiness as their top issue?!?
     
  16. dong20

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    But his wife, Queen Rania ... Let's just say being king clearly has its perks. :biggrin1:
     
  17. B_Artful Dodger

    B_Artful Dodger New Member

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    FUCK! I see what you mean mate! Shes an arabian Julia Roberts!
     
  18. swordfishME

    swordfishME Member

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    Having met (and interviewed) her I have to tell you she is as big a bitch as you would expect someone so beautiful to be. :biggrin1: But at the end of the day she gets to style herself Her Majesty the Queen of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan.

    If you want another beautiful royal try to google images HRH The Princess Consort of Morrocco (Princess Lalla Salma is the only wife of the King but is not styled as Queen).

    TP, Gynandera is hated by almost everyone, it was his brother that was revered. The King of Bhutan is actually FORCING democracy on his people. The love him and the Royal Family and would love for him to be an absolute monarch. Bhutan remains a constitutional monarchy.
     
  19. dong20

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    I was just being superficial ... she wasn't in Jordan when I was there, maybe next time! Anyway, you know what they say about beauty, or maybe she just didn't like you!:tongue:
     
  20. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    Have you perhaps seen Queen Noor? She was an American blueblood, Lisa Halaby, and married the present king's father, Hussein. Her beauty, even at her age today, is just remarkable.
     
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