Expressions That Don't Make Sense

Discussion in 'Funny Stuff: Jokes, Quizzes, Games & Pics' started by B_Jennuine73, Mar 8, 2008.

  1. B_Jennuine73

    B_Jennuine73 New Member

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    He wants his cake and eat it too.

    Of course he'd want to eat it! What else is he going to do with it, wipe his ass?
     
  2. D_Chaumbrelayne_Copprehead

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    How about calling a car that doesn't work a "lemon?"

    Perfectly good little yellow fruit, nice and tangy in drinks and so forth. What does that have to do with cars that don't run right?
     
  3. ZOS23xy

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    I know what you mean!


    Then why are we arguing?
     
  4. D_Chaumbrelayne_Copprehead

    D_Chaumbrelayne_Copprehead Account Disabled

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    Straight from the horse's mouth ... like horses are particularly knowledgable or honest
     
  5. rob_just_rob

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    That expression comes from the need to look at a horse's teeth in order to determine its health/age.
     
  6. rob_just_rob

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    Presumably both leave one with a (metaphorical, in the case of a car) taste in one's mouth?
     
  7. rob_just_rob

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    The expression indicates a person who wants two things that are mutually exclusive.
     
  8. Pecker

    Pecker Retired Moderator
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    Cute as a bug's ear.

    Rhinoceros beetle? Grasshopper?
     
  9. rob_just_rob

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    "I could care less." (not really probative of anything)
     
  10. ManlyBanisters

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    This one originally seems to have been "you can't have your cake and eat it without getting crumbs", which makes a little more sense

    Makes sense to me. The fruit looks great but is it so good when you bite in to it?

    Well - yes, but knowing what someone means and agreeing them aren't the same thing, know what I mean? :rolleyes::wink:

    This has two possible origins (and is probably a combo of both). In betting (on horse racing), the best tips come from the team around the horse in question so something 'from the horse's mouth' is a kind of silly play on that but the second, and older meaning, is that you examine a horse's mouth (teeth specifically) before buying it.

    Edit - rob beat me to it - oh well
     
  11. D_Chaumbrelayne_Copprehead

    D_Chaumbrelayne_Copprehead Account Disabled

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    Fruit fly? Aphid?
     
  12. ManlyBanisters

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    It is annoying but I kind of get it - it's more a question "I could care less?" / "Could I care any less?" (i.e. I care so little that I'm not sure it is possible for me to care any less)
     
  13. D_Chaumbrelayne_Copprehead

    D_Chaumbrelayne_Copprehead Account Disabled

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    Reminds me of regardless vs. irregardless ... sort of thing we say without thinking the meaning through. "I could care less" means "there are things I care less about than this" which means you do care on some level about the thing you say you don't care about.
     
  14. midlifebear

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    Instead of caring less, how about: "Imagine how little I care?"
     
  15. ericbear

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    Take a shit.

    I always leave a shit.
     
  16. beretta8

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    well, shit fire.....
     
  17. Calboner

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    Expressions that "don't make sense" are often the product of misunderstanding or defective cultural transmission.

    The expression is, or at least was: "He wants to eat his cake and have it too" -- i.e., to eat it and still have cake to eat. The meaning is clear and coherent: to want both of two incompatible things. But the expression has become commonly garbled to "He wants to have his cake and eat it too" (not to "He wants his cake and eat it too," which is not even grammatical), which is senseless, since of course you have to have your cake before you can eat it.

    Indeed, people say that, but I have always assumed that it was just a garbled version of "I couldn't care less," which makes perfect sense.

    Another expression that has suffered from garbling is "The proof of the pudding is in the eating." The expression is pithy and has a clear meaning, especially if you understand that the word "proof" here means "test." The point of the expression is that the way to find out if some product is any good is to do with it what it is made for. But the expression has become widely garbled as "The proof is in the pudding," which is as senseless as it is witless.
     
  18. Domisoldo

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    I think the French version is "wanting the butter and the money for the butter".

    Both make perfect sense: one cannot "have" the cake (i.e. un-eaten) and "eat" it too: 2 mutually-exclusive propositions.
     
  19. Domisoldo

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    Although they are not technically "expressions", I believe that "flammable" and "inflammable", when they could still be used interchangeably, caused so much confusion, deaths and severe injuries that "inflammable" (which people misinterpreted as "flame-resistant") had to be taken out of the lexicon.
     
  20. D_Tintagel_Demondong

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    That don't make no sense.
     
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