Fight for Your Right to Party... Affiliation

Discussion in 'Politics' started by D_Percy_Prettywillie, Jul 24, 2011.

  1. D_Percy_Prettywillie

    D_Percy_Prettywillie Account Disabled

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    Fiscal responsibility: the utilization of tax dollars in such a fashion that every cent collected goes as far as it possibly can. Securing the nation: keeping our citizenry safe from threats coming from across the ocean or across our borders by ensuring funding is allocated not only into technological advancements but in necessary human power. Limited government: a government that employs itself to do as much good as it is able to afford without infringing on either the numerated rights of the states or the enumerated rights of the individual. Law and Order: That the state, by virtue of the social contract, must protect the welfare of the public at large by restricting or denying certain rights to certain offenders of that public unity varying in intensity based on the nature of the crime.

    I can get on board with so much of the Conservative approach to governance. As a gay, atheist, who is brown and grew up in the Midwest, I can get on board with a lot of it. At the core these aren't things that should be strictly conservative fundamentals (and a lot of democrats would tell me they aren't, that I've fallen for a perception that went unchallenged for too long- and maybe that's part of it) but fundamentals for anyone seeking public office. For as much... disgust as I feel for certain members of Congress due to their legislative intents, I agree with what they claim are the basis for for their conservatism... right up to the point we get to social legislation.


    That's where the train veers off the tracks. When politicians think they're "doing gods work" by standing against abortion, or gay marriage, or... the teaching of evolution, I can't help but cringe. If they wanted to do Gods work, why not become part of the clergy? Doing the peoples work doesn't entail dogmatic adherence to anything except the law. And trying to interpret the law in such a fashion that it, in any way, reflects the law suggested (demanded) by certain religions is not only dangerous but a betrayal of the very foundations upon which the United States stands.


    I can get on board with so much of what Conservatives of the past have espoused as simple, common sense solutions. Because that's what I think they were- plain, simple to understand, common sense answers as a start for tackling major issues of the day. They lost me (and seemingly their own way) when the party line became "What Would Old Testament God Do?" This is supposed to be a thread for discussion so let me pose a question;

    If you're left leaning or a democrat, did you ever at any point consider voting for a candidate that was right leaning or republican? Was there a point they could have turned your "affiliation" had it not been for some event that came later?

    If you're right leaning or a republican, does the party as it stands really represent what you feel is important or have fringe elements made your voice seem smaller and smaller?
     
    #1 D_Percy_Prettywillie, Jul 24, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2011
  2. dandelion

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    Well Im left leaning and have both voted right and approved wins by the right. The first term of the Thatcher government did many things which the left was incapable of doing for ideological reasons. After the first term, they started to look about for more right wing things to do and matters went a bit off the rails. Similarly, a change of government may become necessary because those in power have driven themselves down a cul de sac and are unable to reverse their own policies. This is helped by a knowledge that in reality there is little to choose between the two sides. One favours the right but fears to lose support from the left, the other the reverse.

    Generally I favour independant MPs of any strip over those of the main parties. However the two main parties have a very firm grip on power which in effect they share. I dont find any of them represent my views, which in effect leaves me entirely disenfranchised.

    The US has a rather different form of central government to the UK. Power is divided in the US between three instsitutions which all need to agree for something to happen. In the UK everything depends upon control of the house of commons by a majority of 1. The US government is designed to prevent anyone doing anything unless all agree. The UK one is designed to guarantee a winner.
     
  3. umami_tsunami

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    I grew up in the Nixon/Ford/Carter era and was first eligible to vote in Carter/Reagan 1980. I was raised in a politically non-partisan home. It was also (gratefully) secular. I have always been an atheist, though not vehemently until 9/11/01.

    My initial political instincts were left leaning. I say instincts because I was not well informed and automatically gravitated towards who I thought was “cooler”. This obviously excluded most all republicans. In my 20’s I started to understand economics (and the hard work involved in making money). My understanding of the economy was simplistic and unsophisticated and many republican philosophies made sense, but I always remained dubious about the socially conservative aspects of republican politics and never voted for a republican president. In a few rare occasions, I have voted for repubs in lesser elections when I thought my community was better served.

    Now, the republican agenda has become so intertwined with not only socially regressive, religiously dogmatic horseshit, but also with dangerous, class-polarizing, supply-side fiscal nonsense that I can’t imagine voting R under any circumstances. Even if I thought the R was the better candidate.

    The R’s used to be the older, smarter, more considered party. Now it’s the party of idiots that think being all “smart” and “elite” and “professorial” is a bad thing. I don’t think all republicans are greedy, racist, chest-thumping, bigoted, jesus loving morons and fag-haters, but if you are any of those things, you’re damn sure not voting D. The good thing is that despite the R’s best efforts to breed and indoctrinate a youth culture that supports them, young people have access to more information than just the crap their parents (or there politicians) try to feed them and don’t want to be associated with the legislation of behavior. Or with corrupt, fear-induced draconian fiscal policies that perpetuate wars and bloated military expansion to fight an enemy that simply DOES NOT EXIST! This will be there downfall.

    To be a registered republican and seriously support their politics in 2011 is like being a member of a country club 50 years ago that won’t allow black people or women in. Fuck them.
     
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