First Hindu prayer in US Senate.. not as smooth as hoped

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by LeeEJ, Jul 13, 2007.

  1. LeeEJ

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    Thinking back to this thread:

    http://www.lpsg.org/et-cetera-et-cetera/47021-so-angry-right-now-when.html

    Video:
    http://www.breitbart.tv/html/2957.html

    The caption reads, "Protesters interrupted the first-ever Hindu prayer in the US Senate. Officers removed the three and charged them."

    Accompanying article:
    http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=070712205448.8n6ee52e&show_article=1&image=large

    Here's my prayer: God, make these so-called "Christians" stop.

    I mean, what the fuck? Here they care, taking advantage of this country's religious freedom and using it to hassle another religion right at the seat of the nation's governing body.

    I hope these protesters get their media time so that more people will see how hateful these Bible-pounders really are.
     
  2. D_N Flay Table

    D_N Flay Table New Member

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    I thought the bible spoke about love and tolerance..
    I guess we know the truth now.

    did you watch that video?
    that man had beautiful things to say.
    and here come your typical jesus bullies.

    douchebags.
     
  3. B_NineInchCock_160IQ

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    The Bible is one long ass book and says a great many things, many of them contradictory to one another and many more pretty vague and open to interpretation. Anyone who claims they understand the message of the Bible IMO clearly does not. This book can be (and has been) used toward virtually any end that you desire, whether you wish to preach love and understanding, or hate and intolerance. You could do either under the guise of being a good Christian. The same could be said for almost any other religion, too.
     
  4. DC_DEEP

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    Religious freedom applies to good, god-fearin' christians, silly. It has nothing to do with heathens.
    "Jesus, save me from your followers!"
     
  5. HotBulge

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    Lowells talk to Cabots, Cabots talk to God
    It's religious bigotry, plain and simple. I am mortified that the Hindu religious figure was interrupted in The Senate during a prayer and that religious tolerance was not respected. The only good resulted from this embarassing episode, however, is that the bigots basically identified themselves and that they were confronted with Change.
     
  6. B_big dirigible

    B_big dirigible New Member

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    Curious. My reading of the First Amendment gives considerable weight to the opinion that nobody in the Senate should be praying on company time.
     
  7. Freddie53

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    Those fools that pulled that stunt in the Senate are fanatical fundies. They are an embarrassment to mainline Christianity.

    There are fanatical Hindus that do the same to Christians in India. For some reason every religion is going to attract a fringe fanatical group that destroys in the eyes of many the character and purpose of the religion.

    In reference to the Bible. It is a long book all right and there are some scary parts of the Old Testament. But Christianity is founded on Jesus who came to do away with the old law and replace it with a new law.

    Whether you believe Jesus to be a mortal man or divine, no question, Jesus taught tolerance, love and compassion, particularly to the downtrodden. His only harsh words were to the fanatical religious leaders of his day which he condemned and paid for it with his death.

    As to the prayers in the House and Senate and having a chaplain, the rationale is that they predate the Constitution started by Benjamin Franklin in the Constitutional Convention where a decision was made to always start every meeting with prayer.

    I just read that yesterday on the Internet and deleted that article or I would provide a link.
     
  8. rob_just_rob

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    It's funny how "mainstream" Christians/Hindus/Muslims/Jews/whoever keep insisting that the fundamentalists among them amount to a tiny minority and describe these fundamentalists as (for example) an "embarassment".

    It's funny to me because there seems to be no end to these embarassing extremists. For such a supposedly tiny minority, they sure get around. And despite being such an embarassment, there doesn't seem to be much tangible effort being made by the "mainstream" to rein them in. It's almost like tacit approval.
     
  9. agnslz

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    Well, at least it wasn't any of the senators themselves protesting.:eek:

    Barry Lynn is spot on though. These people want more Christianity in the public square, not some other "abominable" religion. What a joke they all are.:rolleyes:
     
  10. LeeEJ

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    That's what I thought, too.

    Doesn't it go something like, "You can follow whatever religion you want, but unless it's the same as 'mine', you know that you're going to hell, right?"

    (I actually heard that from a guy up one night in Dupont; thought he was hitting on a girl [a very pretty one, too], but he was just evangelizing instead. I should've stopped him and saved her evening..)

    "It's a shoe!"

    "No! It's a sandal!"

    "Follow the Holy Gourd!!"

    I agree with that, too. But still, I wouldn't want to say that anyone can't do it, either. By their very existence, every religion is a valid religion and deserves to be treated as such. In the Senate, it's just as much ceremonial as anything else.

    I haven't bowed my head in prayer in... well, probably since before puberty. I won't deny someone their right to do so themselves, though.
     
  11. LeeEJ

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    Absolutely. There would've been hell to pay if that was true. I was very relieved when I found out that it was a couple nutjobs instead.
     
  12. SpeedoGuy

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    Agreed 100%. I don't understand why our government tolerates, even promotes, sectarian prayers, blessings and slogans on official time. While government officials are free to worship as they see fit before or after duty, why must it happen, albeit briefly, during duty?

    And why does Congress have an official chaplain? Does it have a rabbi, a yogi, an imam, and a shaman as well? Better to just stay away from prayer officially sanctified by government.
     
  13. kalipygian

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    It should be a meditative focusing excercise, rather than seeking the approval of a supernatural being, or performing a magic ritual.
    No individual is prevented from personally and privately praying.
    Historically, the parts of the mass that were the mystery were said inaudibly by the priest, and in an ancient language that likely was not understood by many of the congregation.
     
  14. HotBulge

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    Agreed, but it's an all or nothing proposition. Either all of the major established religions should have the option to read in The Senate or no religions at all. Since there is an age old precedent of having a Christian chaplain to open the Senate proceedings, then it is equally fair to have a Hindu one occasionally. If people can;t be respectful of multiple religious backgrounds, then none of them should be allowed (if equal treatment under the law).

    We all, though, are often better off for more reflective words of wisdom than none at all.
     
  15. DC_DEEP

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    My first impression, but I wanted to address the OP before I got to that...
     
  16. LeeEJ

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    Maybe, but each of those acts are all part of one religion or another (or more), too.

    It still boggles my mind that any part of a religion should remain a mystery. But, I guess that's what drives followers to accept teachings on faith and to not question those teachings' validity themselves. Mystery breeds fear, after all, and you can convince a fearful person of almost anything if you say that they'll be saved.

    Ideally, I'd want it like that, too. Getting one religion more involved than others implies endorsing that religion and, therefore, belittling the others.

    Somehow, though, maybe the state could help temper religion by recognizing it and having some involvement. The Bible can -- and has been -- used to justify slavery, remember; but the state stepped in and said that it was wrong. If a government completely dismissed all religion as bogus, dangerous, and invalid (as I do, but that's another story), religious followers would feel threatened by that government and, quite possibly, rebel. Then, when they feel that God is "on their side", they won't be afraid to try anything, including blowing themselves up.

    A government should be able to keep a handle on religion.. but not let any single religion completely guide its agenda.

    Chaplains, in my experience in a government/military setting, do not strictly adhere to any single branch/facet/sect/fragment of religion, either. While each one may have a focus of their own, they tend to be quite well-versed in many other religions.

    Government chaplains do, and don't, offend me. Their presence pushes the line of church/state separation, IMO. But, thankfully, you'll never see a Southern Baptist chaplain shouting at the top of his lungs, because they just don't seem to exist -- and they get some respect from me because of that.
     
  17. Pumblechook

    Pumblechook New Member

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    It's not the christians' fault; it's not the hindus' fault; it's not the non-believers' fault;

    It's everyone's... and especially no one's

    "all spiritual paths are not true paths that can lead one to the universal realm of universal oneness. People may call them spiritual, but in reality they are only mental constructs. Follow only the universal way that is above all words, embrace only the oneness that is above all form, and ignore all divergence."
     
  18. dufus

    dufus New Member

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    I wouldn't be surprised at all if one of the Republican Bible Belt senators put them up to it. Wasn't the group from Miss.?
     
  19. Freddie53

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    It is a free country, they can't be reigned in. I'm Methodist. Our church has no jurisdiction over people who are members of these fundie churches.

    I understand your point, but a visable minority can create havoc for the rest of the crowd. Quite often the people who pull these kind of stnts for attention don't even go to church.

    People objecting to idiots like were in the Senate never get the press coverage that the idiots do.

    I spoke up here I will speak up at my church and to the people I am around. That is about all I can do personally. I'm sure that many of the mainline churches make statements condemning the idiots, but that doesn't get press coverage.

    The mainline churches are Methodist, Presbyterian, Lutheran, Episcopal Disciples of Christ, Unitarian and some Reformed churches. Sadly the membership of those churches is declining while the membership of the fundie churches is growing. So this "tiny" part of the church is getting bigger. And that is true of Muslims as well.

    It makes me as sick as hell.

    There is nothing better than a wonderful religous and spiritual person who follows all the good things that a religion can teach.

    There is nothing worse than a person who totally distorts religion and spirituality for personal gain or just because they are bigots.
     
  20. B_NineInchCock_160IQ

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    Nothing better? Really? Haven't you seen the iPhone?
     
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