foresking trouble

Discussion in 'Sex With a Large Penis' started by sollozzo, Feb 23, 2008.

  1. sollozzo

    Verified Gold Member

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    i cant seem to get my foreskin down over my head when im hard, is this a bad thing, and is there anyway i can loosen it?
     
  2. Hellboy0

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    Gently stretching your foreskin over a period of time will loosen it enough to eventually allow you to pull it back. Be gentle and do it often, and you'll get there.
     
  3. B_ScaredLittleBoy

    B_ScaredLittleBoy New Member

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    As long as there is no pain then its okay. I was getting hardons and masturbating since about 11 years old, didn't actually pull the skin back til I was 16.

    I did a bit of stretching and now it goes about halfway down the head when hard. Which is enough. It hasn't broken yet.

    If you want to stretch, here's what you need:

    1. Some steroid cream eg Hydrocortisone 1%
    2. Lube

    Apply the cream and perhaps some lube and pull the foreskin back as far as you can, and either hold it or repeat (eg move it backwards and forwards repeatedly).

    Do that for as long as possible daily/nightly. 15 minutes is probably enough but 30 mins is ideal. I used to watch the Discovery Channel while I was doing it :redface:.

    After a few weeks to a couple months you should see results. Good luck
     
  4. SteveHd

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  5. cyberczar

    cyberczar New Member

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    There seems to be an over-abundance of these types of questions here. Regardless, no message board or forum is an appropriate venue for seeking medical advice, and no one here should provide it. At the very best, it's impossible to make a diagnosis without physical examination, and at the worst, a mis-diagnosis or wrong disagnosis can lead to injury.

    That being said, Wikipedia has some information on the subject of phimosis that may prove helpful to you. Wikipedia however is not a source of medical information. In any event, questions about your penis should be directed towards your family's physician or urologist and not the Internet:

    Phimosis in older children and adults can vary in severity, with some men able to retract their foreskin partially ("relative phimosis"), and some completely unable to retract their foreskin even in the flaccid state ("full phimosis").
    Because of the "elasticity" of the diagnostic criteria, there has been considerable variation in the reported prevalence of pathological phimosis. An incidence rate of 1% to 2% of the uncircumcised adult male population is often cited, though some studies of older children or adolescents have reported higher rates.[1] Relative phimosis is more common, with estimates of its frequency at approximately 8% of uncircumcised men.[12]
    When phimosis develops in an uncircumcised adult who was previously able to retract his foreskin, it is nearly always due to a pathological cause, and is far more likely to cause problems for the man.
    An important cause of acquired, pathological phimosis is chronic balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO), a skin condition of unknown origin that causes a whitish ring of indurated tissue (a cicatrix) to form near the tip of the prepuce. This inelastic tissue prevents retraction. Some evidence suggests that BXO may be the same disease as lichen sclerosus et atrophicus of the vulva in females.[13] Infectious, inflammatory, and hormonal factors have all been implicated or proposed as contributing factors. Circumcision is usually recommended though alternatives have been advocated.
    Phimosis may occur after other types of chronic inflammation (e.g., balanoposthitis), repeated catheterization, or forceful foreskin retraction.[1]
    Phimosis may also sometimes be brought on by diabetes, due to high levels of sugar being present in the urine of some diabetics, which creates the right conditions for bacteria to breed, under the foreskin.


    If phimosis in older children or adults is not causing acute and severe problems, nonsurgical measures may be effective. Choice of treatment is often determined by whether the patient (or doctor) views circumcision as an option of last resort to be avoided or as the preferred course. Some adults with nonretractile foreskins have no difficulties and see no need for correction.
    Circumcision is the traditional surgical solution for pathological phimosis, and is effective. Serious complications from circumcision are very rare, but minor complication rates (e.g., having to perform a second procedure or meatotomy to revise the first or to re-open the urethra) have been reported in about 0.2-0.6% in most reported series,[6] though others quote higher rates.[9]
    Preputioplasty, in which a limited dorsal slit with transverse closure is made along the constricting band of skin[15][16] can be an effective alternative to full circumcision.[9] It has the advantage of only extremely limited pain and a very short time of healing relative to the rather more traumatic circumcision, together with no cosmetic effects.
    High rates of success have been reported with several nonsurgical measures:
    Application of topical steroid cream for 4-6 weeks to the narrow part of the foreskin is relatively simple and less expensive than surgical treatments.[9] It has replaced circumcision as the preferred treatment method for some physicians in the U.K. National Health Service.[17][18]
    There is a school of opinion among the medical profession that advocates and promotes a number of alternative methods where surgery, with all the attendant risks, can be avoided. Stretching of the foreskin can be accomplished manually, sometimes with masturbation, also known as the Beaugé method.[19] The stretching can also be accomplished with balloons placed under the foreskin skin under anaesthesia,[20]or with a tool.[21] The tissue expansion promotes the growth of new skin cells to permanently expand the narrow preputial ring that prevents retraction.
    Dilation and Stretching
    Skin that is under tension expands by growing additional cells. A permanent increase in size occurs by gentle stretching over a period of time. The treatment is non-traumatic and non-destructive. Manual stretching may be carried out without the aid of a medical doctor. The treatment is inexpensive. Relief of phimosis by a stretching technique has the advantage of preserving all foreskin tissue and the sexual pleasure nerves. The Beaugé Method has proved successful for many.

    Bottom line: Go see your doctor.
     
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