Four Transplant Recipients Contract H.I.V.

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by B_Italian1, Nov 13, 2007.

  1. B_Italian1

    B_Italian1 New Member

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    Four Transplant Recipients Contract H.I.V.

    By DENISE GRADY
    Published: November 13, 2007

    Four transplant recipients in Chicago have contracted H.I.V. from an organ donor, the first known cases of the virus being spread by organ transplants in 22 years, The Chicago Tribune is reporting today.

    The patients also contracted the hepatitis C virus.

    The organ donor tested negative for both diseases health officials said — apparently because the donor was infected too recently for commonly used blood tests to detect the infection. Those blood tests do not find the virus itself; they look instead for the body’s reaction to the infection — antibodies produced by the immune system.

    But the body takes time to react, and if the test is done too soon — within 22 days of infection — the antibodies may not be detected. Doctors say that is what probably occurred these cases.

    It has always been known that this kind of transmission was theoretically possible, but it was considered highly unlikely. And indeed, 400,000 transplants have occurred without any previous reported cases of H.I.V. transmission.

    Another type of test can pick up viral infections earlier, but it was not used on this donor.

    The organ donor was known to be at high risk of being infected with H.I.V., officials said, but the nature of the risk was not disclosed, nor was the cause of death. Federal guidelines recommend against transplanting organs from high-risk people, unless the recipients are so likely to die for want of a transplant that the chance of transmitting H.I.V. seems a lesser threat. There is a shortage of organs for transplant, and many patients die on the waiting list.


    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/13/health/13cnd-organ.html?ref=health
     
  2. findfirefox

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    That is terrible to hear, I have to wonder if the alternative to using this high-risk organ was death and that this was the best option at the time. At least the man may have a few years more to spend with his family.
    ---

    Okay, what is your angle for posting this, given your past history I really don't trust you're posting this just because it sad or interesting...
     
  3. B_Think_Kink

    B_Think_Kink New Member

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    That is tragic. I guess there isn't much that can be done at this point though.
     
  4. HazelGod

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    No worry...it's not HIV that causes AIDS, didn't you know? It's the drugs they give HIV patients. So long as they don't ever take AZT, they should be fine. :rolleyes:
     
  5. B_Italian1

    B_Italian1 New Member

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    Those people needed organs to save their lives and now they have to deal with HIV, Hepatitis C, and possible organ rejection. Talk about being at the wrong place at the wrong time.

    I seem to remember a post like that. :rolleyes:
     
  6. findfirefox

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    So their other option was to die. You're right, there has never been an organ rejection till HIV and Hepatitis came around.

    Also, Hepatitis C is treatable (meaning SURVIVING)

    Getting HIV is terrible but this might have been a god send to the man who received the organ.
     
  7. IntoxicatingToxin

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    You can survive with both HIV and Hep C. It doesn't mean that life is easy. I have two relatives that are each infected with one of these... one with HIV and one with Hep C. I'm constantly aware of their struggles in having to deal with their illnesses. It breaks my heart. The relative with Hep C may need to have a liver transplant because of it. So these poor people just got one organ transplanted, and due to the Hep C, they may need to have another. I just hope that they don't have to pay for THAT surgery. :rolleyes:
     
  8. B_Italian1

    B_Italian1 New Member

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    4 different people got the organs. That's how I understood it.
     
  9. findfirefox

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    Okay, my same idea still stands. (Just take out the word "man" or anything indicating a single person)

    If their really that unhappy and would have rather died tell them to move to Oregon, we still have death with dignity.
     
  10. B_Italian1

    B_Italian1 New Member

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    I smell a lawsuit. :scratchchin:
     
  11. chico8

    chico8 New Member

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    Since organ donatees have to take immune suppression drugs for the rest of their lives, I wonder how that will affect the progression of the HIV?
     
  12. findfirefox

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    That is interesting.

    So their immune system is being suppressed and then the HIV comes in and further "suppresses" it. Maybe they could balance it out in a way, for example putting them on the suppression drugs but as the HIV progresses give lesser and lesser doses or something.

    (I doubt that will have any effect at all, I'm not a doctor)

    HIV cocktails use RTI's, PIs, Fusion inhibitors (Fuzeon), and entry inhibitors. None of those drugs "protect" or create a "stronger" immune system so they could still take them... but it might be possible these drugs could block the effect of the suppressing drugs.
     
  13. B_sugarandspice

    B_sugarandspice New Member

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    GEE, that doesn't seem to be the case in the countries where paople are dropping like flies from HIV where they don't even have access to the drugs or condoms most of the time. Those things cost money.
    Condoms and medicine do not drop from the sky in case you didn't know.
     
  14. findfirefox

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    No really? WOW I AM SO SUPPRISED! Money? Whats that? Poor people, huh? I no understandy.

    I was pointing that out in responce too chico's comments, I'm not saying "everyone can get these drugs that are in some cases around $50,000 a year"
     
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