Goodbye LPSG and...

Discussion in 'Politics' started by slurper_la, Apr 6, 2010.

  1. slurper_la

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    ...other unfavorable internet sites and content. I hope our conservative right wingnuts, such as GinSoakedNick and InSanity will be happy about corporate reign over the internet when they are kicked offline by Comcast or other carriers who which deem their surfing activity immoral.


    US Court Rules AGAINST FCC On Net Neutrality In Big Win For Comcast
     
  2. B_RedDude

    B_RedDude New Member

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    Truly frightening, and not just in relation to adult sites. In the good ol' USA everything is available to the highest bidder.

    Everything is commercialized, even Congress.

     
    #2 B_RedDude, Apr 6, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2010
  3. B_VinylBoy

    B_VinylBoy New Member

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    Although the ruling does suck, it's not the first time something like this has happened. Big companies like Comcast will always be fussy about their bandwidth, especially if people are using things like BitTorrent. And let's be honest here, that is a breeding den for bootleg software and the like. All it would take is a couple of software media giants like Adobe, Microsoft or others to make a complaint to an ISP and all hell breaks loose. Grant it, most ISPs are not going to go after someone unless what they do is excessive in the same manner as major record labels that go after some people for downloading MP3s on Kazaa. Moderation is the key here. Just because you can essentially get everything for free online doesn't mean that you should.

    But if the fact that a company like Comcast playing morality police scares you, how do you combat it? Simple... find a better ISP. Some of the smaller companies do not care what you do with their bandwidth as long as you're not spamming people or running illegal software, distributing viruses or other forms of malware. There's a website called DSL Reports that is a great source for finding inexpensive ISPs, and a community of people who have used many of the services listed who give direct, unapologetic reviews. If the service is good, you'll see it. If it sucks, well... you thought THIS board gets nasty. LOL!!

    In all honesty, unless you have Comcast as your ONLY option I don't understand why anyone would want their shoddy service? Same goes for Time Warner, Verizon or any of the big names.
     
  4. D_Geffarde Phartsmeller

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    Unfortunately, those are my only options! Comcast and AT&T. The smaller companies often get bought out by the larger ones because this is America! Everyone has the same goal: money. If Comcast is offering to buy your small-town ISP for 5x it's worth, prepare for the switch to Comcast. And if small-town ISP doesn't sell, Comcast will simply move into the area (albeit at a slower pace) and undercut on prices.

    Capitalism strikes again!
     
  5. midlifebear

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    Hmmmm. . . we use DirectPC and DirectTV in all three countries. In the USA they seem to be the arch nemesis of Comcast. They are always throwing on their own PSAs asking subscribers to call local government representatives and tell them to vote "No" on everything because they are not a cable company, per se. Granted, Comcast is the worst network provider short of the one that comes out of Garth's basement in Cleveland.
     
  6. B_VinylBoy

    B_VinylBoy New Member

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    I'm an internet geek from the old school. It's really not as bad as it seems. I have no problems switching ISPs whenever I need to. Great deals pop up all the time, and the smaller companies do give better service since they don't have such a large customer base. Many of the smaller companies do not have massive early termination fees either. Most DSL services are repackaged Verizon and Covad products anyhow... you just don't have to deal with their shoddy customer service or their restrictive guidelines. If you have access to any form of DSL, you have access to a lot more ISPs than you think. If you're worried about e-mail when you switch ISPs? Simple solution... use a free e-mail service like Gmail or create your own domain. That way, even if your internet goes down you don't lose anything. It costs practically nothing to register your own dot-com or net these days and they all come with a number of e-mail accounts.

    Seriously, check out the link I provided to DSL Reports earlier and search the system by your zip code. It may be all about the money, but in the end I'd rather give it to the little guy. He'll be a lot more appreciative. :wink:
     
  7. HazelGod

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    Don't be so quick to cluck about the sky falling, people.

    This ruling merely derides the notion that the FCC can enforce policy guidelines as though they carried the weight of law.

    From a legal viewpoint, it's a good thing. Such "guidelines" can be written and adopted by unchallenged groups (or even one individual!) with no oversight in the process. The idea of allowing such things to be enforced as law should be frightening to anyone who respects our system of rules.

    This challenge, and the outcome of it, has long been expected by the FCC...which is why there has been the push in recent months to have the guidelines of Net Neutrality codified into an enforceable set of statutes.

    By no means is this a death knell for the internet as we know it...this is merely a corporate obstructionist roadblock being thrown up to delay the inevitable in the interests of slowing down the process long enough for them to squeeze every last possible dime out of their current business model before these disruptive technologies force them to rethink things.
     
  8. lucky8

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    It's only a matter of time before ISPs start trying to "bundle" internet packages in the same fashion as cable tv. If guidelines aren't set, in all likelihood it will happen. Thank god for pro-consumer firms like Apple and Google though...they're on our side in this whole debate...and have the money to make things happen too
     
  9. HazelGod

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    :lmao:

    Holy shit, that's the most ludicrous statement I've read all day!
     
  10. lucky8

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    Both of these companies publicly support net neutrality...restrictions would kill their business

    ...I should have specified: by "pro-consumer" I mean they're so successful because they're the first major tech companies to build their business models off of offering consumers pretty much every desirable attribute imaginable in their products and services...essentially giving the consumer what they want in order to become industry leaders
     
  11. midlifebear

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    I'd still like to fuck Steve Jobs.
     
  12. B_stanmarsh14

    B_stanmarsh14 New Member

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    So would I..... with a baseball bat, covered in Wasabi, and inserted slowly into his anus :evil:
     
  13. B_VinylBoy

    B_VinylBoy New Member

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    Don't be so quick to jump to conclusions.
    Apple & Google's main product has nothing to do with television or music. Those are just parts of the one thing they're really trying to sell. Hardware.

    Just look at the history of the iPod. If it was really an issue about selling music, then Apple would have made the device not only play a precise file type, but they would make it so the only music you could add to it was purchased through the iTunes Music Store. Considering their user base, they could have easily implemented this. Apple doesn't care whether or not you get your music from your CD collection, from digitized, scratchy vinyl found in your attic, or if you download all of your music from BitTorrent. All Apple cares about is that you're playing it on an iPod.

    And don't get me started on the iPhone. The fact that phones can easily be hacked to use T-Mobile, and after 2-3 years they still haven't addressed that should be a real tell. :wink:
     
  14. B_RedDude

    B_RedDude New Member

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    With all due respect, midlifebear, there's something about that dude that just gets on my nerves.

     
  15. maxcok

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    From the OP's cited article:

    "The cable company had also argued the FCC lacks authority to mandate net neutrality because it had deregulated broadband under the Bush administration, a decision upheld by the Supreme Court in 2005."

    Another of those deregulatory moves that went largely unnoticed at the time, but has potentially far reaching implications. It remains to be seen how this will ultimately play out, but the chips are beginning to fall.

    The mainstream media, i.e. teevee, radio, and what's left of newspapers, are mostly corporate shills. The free exchange of ideas and information fostered by net neutrality (1) - and limitations on corporate influence peddling (2) - are/were the only things standing between us and complete corporate dominance of the message and government policy. We know what the verdict is on count two - the U.S. Supreme Court just allowed corporate entities, as 'people' of unlimited means, to essentially buy elections. It will be a long time, if ever, before we can turn back the clock on that - it is a self-sustaining phenomenon. The verdict is still out on count one - we should all be very concerned and watching very closely. It's the last straw. They're connected.

    Roughly 40% of the U.S. population lives in rural areas, or "urban" areas with a population under 50,000. The smaller the population, the more limited are the services and options typically available. The cost of alternative services can also be prohibitively expensive relative to income in many of those areas. Sometimes I think I need to remind you big city folk not everybody lives down the block. :wink:
     
    #15 maxcok, Apr 6, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2010
  16. houtx48

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    I'd still like to fuck Steve Jobs.....on his G5
     
  17. B_VinylBoy

    B_VinylBoy New Member

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    Point taken.
    But even many rural areas still have access to something beyond the one or two big named options. There's also cellular and satellite services as well. It's not all done through the cable or traditional phone lines. Many people just simply don't know this, because for one you have to be kinda nerdy and who wants to act like a Sheldon Cooper all of the time. But it does require some detailed investigating and a lot of patience.

    I've been through enough ISPs these last 20 years to figure out a few things. The Cable/DSL Internet game isn't nearly as complicated as it seems. They're all essentially selling the same thing as the smaller boys. :wink:
     
  18. B_Nick4444

    B_Nick4444 New Member

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    dang!

    when I read the thread title, I thought another lib was biting the dust

    oh, well!
     
  19. B_VinylBoy

    B_VinylBoy New Member

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    Much to your chagrin, I'm sure.
    You can go back to your closet now. Keep up the stupid comments and I'll seal your glory hole shut too. :rolleyes:
     
  20. maxcok

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    This time with emphasis. I could have added that folks in these areas are generally behind the curve in cyber sophistication too, and a large percent wouldn't know the options available, if they were available, or how to track them down. Where I am, it's local dial up provider or satellite, no cable, that's it buddy. :smile:
     
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