Happy indigenous peoples day

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by MickeyLee, Oct 8, 2018.

  1. MickeyLee

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    #1 MickeyLee, Oct 8, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2018
  2. vibrationzzz

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    I dunno Ms Mickey. If I were a voyager from those years, with my limited knowledge now I probably back then would have seen myself as a mariner who voyaged into the unknown, to go where no human has gone before.

    Would have been scary with all the legends of Mermaids, Giant octopuses and sailing off the edge of a flat world...Cyclops, Medusa and golden fleeces :)

    Tis a bloody shame though they did not have the directive of not influencing native inhabitants.

    But I spose, this is where we learn our lessons..to create a show where it is written in to educate ourselves not to interfere.

    So says Jon Luc Picard.

    I place no blame on those who came before us. I place blame on those who have not learned from our experiences.

    I think you would have been one of those who would have jumped aboard one of those leaky wooden ships, just to see what was on the other side.. You be an explorer at heart :)
     
    #2 vibrationzzz, Oct 10, 2018
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  3. vibrationzzz

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    And as far as the UK goes...I think Queen Vicky was in charge. Women were in control too, very much so of things back then. Not much got by her rule. Little of stature, but bitch by Queenhood :)

    You had to be back then. Or...It's....Awf with the head....
     
  4. TexanStar

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    "Influencing"... is that what they call it these days?

    Bloody shame indeed.
     
  5. MickeyLee

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    Influencing sounds much better than genocide.

    Cuz genocide was exactly what happened. Disease, slavery, exploitation. Ya know... shit that don't read well on the old CV.

    I stand by Fuck Columbus.
     
  6. rbkwp

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    related
    indigenous, preservers of the land
    vs
    western style,land grab of/and with some the striving for wealth
    theres a difference

    THE PICTURE SHOW
    [​IMG]
    James Rodriguez for NPR
    The seeds of Maya genius are growing a new kind of school.
    Imagine a small, developing nation where schools are poorly funded, students can't afford tuition or books, and fewer than half of indigenous girls even attend school — and often drop out to take care of siblings or get married. These are the schools of rural Guatemala. Meet the 34-year-old firebrand educator who believes he can reinvent the country’s schools and students.
     
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  7. vibrationzzz

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    I think my writings in past posts and threads regarding my homeland and gross crimes committed by European explorers and their masters against indigenous peoples is that I 100 % agree with you.

    Not only then, but continuing today.

    Sometimes my wording is not perfect, in fact, I'm far from it.
     
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  8. rbkwp

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    LISTEN

    but pehaps associated as INDIGENOUS WW in particular thru absolutely no doing of ther own are affected vastly by GW/CC
    - personal thought

    As more Aboriginal children are removed from families, critics say government risks a second Stolen Generation
    PRI's The World

    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    As more Aboriginal children are removed from families, critics say government risks a second Stolen Generation


    precisely v,same here

    never thought there was any negativity for one minute we downunder tend to readily accept wording as such
    full on perfection in education is not a pre-requsite in being a better/more informative person huh

    Sometimes my wording is not perfect, in fact, I'm far from it.
     
  9. rbkwp

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  10. rbkwp

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    [​IMG]
    And in our discussion group, the Global Nation Exchange, we marked Indigenous People's Day. "The history of how these Indigenous lands became property of the United States is more complex than many of us realize," writes historian Brenden Rensick. "Whose ancestral lands do you live on?"

    Thanks for joining us this week!
     
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  11. vibrationzzz

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    Many don't understand how the first settlers came to Australia rb.
     
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  12. rbkwp

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    FLASHBACK

    possibly
    rare occasion when an indigenous act went wrong, but that was back then huh


    WHY YOU SHOULD CARE

    Because it remains one of the most controversial — and devastating — episodes in South African history.

    By Nick Dall


    [​IMG]

    THE DAILY DOSENOV 01 2018

    On an April morning in 1856, as girls frightened birds away from the crops on the banks of the Gxarha River, Nongqawuse, 15, and Nombanda, 10, were delivered a message by two strangers who appeared out of nowhere. The message, according to Jeff Peires’ seminal work The Dead Will Arise,went something like this: “Tell that the whole community will rise from the dead; and that all cattle now living must be slaughtered for they have been reared by contaminated hands… There should be no cultivation, but great new grain pits must be dug, new houses must be built and great strong cattle enclosures must be erected” to prepare for the coming of plentiful crops, cattle and the Xhosa ancestors who would drive the White invaders into the sea.

    Since the arrival of the first European settlers in the 1770s, the Xhosas had seen their land seized, their cattle stolen and their people subjugated and killed. By 1856 they had already fought eight frontier wars and watched as their cattle became contaminated with lung disease that had been inadvertently introduced by the settlers. Mhlakaza, Nongqawuse’s uncle, didn’t take the message seriously at first. But when he recognized one of the “strangers,” based on the girls’ description, as his own brother, Mhlakaza started slaughtering his cattle and telling others to do the same.

    The movement, which began as a trickle, turned into a deluge after the great chief Sarhili traveled to the Gxarha, where “the same voices that spoke to Nongqawuse spoke to him as well,” according to an oral source from the time. Over 15 months, the Xhosas massacred 400,000 cattle and destroyed countless acres of crops. Tens of thousands of people died of starvation, with many more fleeing their homes, which allowed Cape Colony Gov. George Grey and the British colonists to finally wrest control of the fertile territory they’d been lusting after for decades.

    THE NONGQAWUSE CATASTROPHE WAS AS MUCH A MURDER AS IT WAS A SUICIDE.

    JEFF PEIRES, AUTHOR OF THE DEAD WILL ARISE

    Peires debunks the British theory that the cattle killing was a Xhosa conspiracy to bring about war, but he also refutes the commonly held Xhosa belief that Grey somehow orchestrated the bloody movement. Which is not to say that Grey didn’t encourage or capitalize on it. “We can draw very great permanent advantages from the circumstance, which may be made a steppingstone for the future settlement of the country,” Grey wrote in a letter. Arguing that the movement was a “logical and rational response” by a nation that could see no other alternative, Peires rejects the prevailing colonial description of the episode as “the national suicide of the Xhosa,” insisting that “the Nongqawuse catastrophe was as much a murder as it was a suicide.”



    Nongqawuse (right), the Xhosa prophetess who preached the killing of all Xhosa cattle in the 19th century, with another prophetess from the same movement, Nonkosi.

    SOURCE CREATIVE COMMONS



    The prophecy “tapped into a deep reservoir of desperation,” explains Adam Ashforth, a professor of African studies at the University of Michigan who has written on the topic. Acknowledging that the cattle killing was “unusual in the extent of the sacrifice,” Ashforth says that it was “not unusual in itself.” Similar millenarian movements among people who rally around often apocalyptic religious prophecies were seen throughout Africa during colonial times. In 1905, for example, the Maji Maji rebellion in German East Africa (present-day Tanzania) involved an African spirit medium giving his followers war medicine that he said would turn German bullets into water. And as recently as 2011, Ashforth points out, people suffering from all manner of diseases flocked to a remote Tanzanian village to be “cured” by a retired Lutheran priest who claimed to be acting on direct orders from God.

    More than 150 years later, the Xhosas have never fully recovered from the cattle-killing catastrophe. True, Nelson Mandela, a Xhosa born 100 miles east of the Gxarha, was elected in 1994 as South Africa’s first democratic president, but the Eastern Cape remains the poorest province in the country. What’s more, the horrific event paved the way for Christianity to take hold in the area. Seeing the Europeans’ dominance, the Xhosas inferred that “White people had access to a very powerful god,” says Ashforth, and decided that they “wanted a bit of that too.” They were hardly alone: In 1850, according to Ashforth, almost no one in southern Africa, excluding the Europeans, was Christian. By 1950, he says, almost everybody was.


    The cattle killing became imprinted on a psychologically scarred nation. “Few people who hear the story of Nongqawuse,” writes Peires in The Dead Will Arise, “ever forget it.” The tale, says Ashforth, “emerges at different times and in different ways and is told for different purposes.” Historians, politicians and tribal leaders have at various times used the parable of Nongqawuse to warn against the fickleness of youth, the folly of women, the dangers of superstition and the evil of George Grey and the Whites.

    Even today, commentators are quick to blame problems besetting South Africa on the so-called Nongqawuse syndrome. A quick Google search turned up articles describing the leaders of all three of the country’s largest political parties as “Nongqawuse figures” — and not in a good way.

    • Nick Dall, OZY AuthorContact Nick Dall
    The Cattle Massacre That Haunts South Africa
     
    #12 rbkwp, Nov 1, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2018
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  13. rbkwp

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    mark 10 up for indigenous and others perseverance

    It’s Friday, November 9, and Trump forgot one crucial thing when he approved Keystone XL.

    [​IMG]

    After years of protests by indigenous communities, environmental groups, and justice organizations, President Obama finally rejected the northern leg of the Keystone XL pipeline back in 2015. (Remember him?) That didn’t last long, though. Trump made good on one of his big campaign promises by approving the project in his first months in office.

    Obama may be long gone, but one of the federal judges he appointed, Brian Morris, is still kickin’ it. Yesterday, Morris ruled that President Trump failed to consider climate change when he approved the pipeline last year. That’s a serious blow to the Trump administration’s big plans.

    Basically, Morris pointed out that Trump’s team ignored the Obama administration’s position on climate change and failed to explain why.

    Morris ordered the administration to come up with a new environmental analysis that considers climate change. He also said the administration needed to consider data about oil spills and the pipeline’s effects on “cultural resources.” As indigenous groups and others have been pointing out for a long time, pipelines have detrimental effects on communities and ecosystems.

    Morris’ decision doesn’t necessarily mean the pipeline is dead forever, but TransCanada — the company behind the project — hasn’t appealed the ruling. Until it does that or else hammers out some serious issues with Keystone XL, it’s blocked from “engaging in any activity” that has to do with the pipeline.

    Needless to say, President Trump isn’t happy with Morris’ ruling. “It was a political decision made by a judge. I think it’s a disgrace,” Trump told reporters today. Settle down, champ. No one likes a sore loser.

    Zoya Teirstein
     
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  14. vibrationzzz

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    The first arrivals here were through the northern part of Australia, when New Guinea and Aus was known as Sahul. There was a land bridge around 65,000 years ago.

    To get to Sahul ( now known as Australia and New Guinea), from Asia ( then Sunda), there had to be an ocean journey by boat or raft 65- 70,000 years ago, recognised as the first great feat of seafarers of the world.

    We began as boat people, yet now we turn them away. Our shame indeed.

    The spread of people to Australia - Australian Museum

    It's the reason why I always think to get on a leaky raft or boat and risk all to go into the unknown where no human has gone before, takes a whole lot of guts and well worth them becoming a citizen or friend.

    Past, present or future.

    Mixed bunch we be :)
     
    #14 vibrationzzz, Nov 10, 2018
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  15. rbkwp

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    according to our indigenouus deputy PM Winston, we Kiwis origiated from CHINA not so much Hawaii or breaking away from godwannaland/whatever huh
    think he was after the asian vote at the time

    anyway i THINK
    and this
    beg its NO GENERALIZATION on our fellow people
    but am thinking we down under have a pretty close affinity with our indigenous/the land, because its only been less than a few hundred years since foreigners arrived and westernzed with disease religion rape and pillage

    in saying that
    i western LOVE online shopping
    esp with free delivery

    Mixed bunch we be :)
     
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  16. rbkwp

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    GREAT

    wonder where wealth driven corporates originated from
    note
    China not involved but just as bad no doubt

    TANZANIAN FARMERS CRACK THE CODE FOR FIGHTING LAND GRAB
    Tanzanian Farmers Are Seizing Back Their Land

    They’re fighting for their rights. Communities across the East African country are using a variety of tools to win back territory from land-grabbing corporations and officials. The Maasai people, for instance, recently won an injunction blocking the seizure of ancestral land that had been earmarked by Dubai royalty for a private game park. Others have simply mapped out and registered their land with authorities, making it harder for outsiders to move in. Newly armed with legal means, Tanzania’s farmers are now more mindful than ever of such land grabs.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    WE ARE VERY CAREFUL NEVER AGAIN TO ALLOW SUCH DUBIOUS DEALS

    https://www.ozy.com/fast-forward/tanzanian-farmers-crack-the-code-for-fighting-land-grab/8856
     
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