Have you changed your mind at all about who you're voting for?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Redsquall, Oct 17, 2008.

  1. Redsquall

    Redsquall New Member

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    I'm just curious. Who are you for and were you always for that candidate?
     
  2. cocktoberfest

    cocktoberfest New Member

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    obama. yes.
     
  3. marleyisalegend

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    Undecideds piss me off. I'd understand you being undecided...oh....5 months ago, but we're 3 weeks before the election. There's no talent portion, nothing new is going to pop up,, nothing's going to be said now that hasn't been said for months.

    The only undecideds I understand are the ones too busy to keep up with the candidates. For anyone with 10 free minutes, you can check both their voting records in 3 min. each and still have 4 minutes left over to jerk your little weiner.

    Some of the undecideds remind me of the kids who wear all black not because they like black, but just to say that they're doing something different from everybody else. Give me a break.
     
  4. Phil Ayesho

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    I have been for ousting the republican party and getting some more liberal thinking in government since Bush "decidered" to attack the wrong country in an unprovoked war of aggression over oil.


    The idea of having a democratic congress AND executive for the first time n a long time... and the idea of FINALLY getting this nation OFF of the ill conceived and moronic "free market" stupidity of the past 20 plus years... is exciting and promising.


    I have had it with the religious right and their hypocritical moralizing... had it with republican collusion in the theft of public funds and the erosion of separation... had it with "I got mine" mentality and total lack of foresight and planning...


    I am hopeful of a democratic sweep... and hopeful the coming investigations will, at long last, make clear to America's conservatives how they have been swindled into supporting people who have been the diametric opposite of conservatives in regards to money, to foreign policy, the environment, constitutional law and law enforcement.
     
  5. B_Nick8

    B_Nick8 New Member

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    I was for Hillary but I'm delighted with Obama.
     
  6. Principessa

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    Initially I was for Hillary in hopes she would be just like Bill. :redface:

    However, I switched to Obama in February after hearing her speak on either Tyra or The View. Clinton said she would bring all the troops home in her first 100 days. I'm no military strategist but I know that's impossible and irrational. :rolleyes: :duh:

    Then there was all the crap with people on her campaign team who subsequently resigned and her plausible deniability. She appeared desperate and deceitful. Not good things in a presidential wannabe.

    By the time she offered Obama the Vice Presidency I was over her and on to him. How the hell do you offer the vice presidency to the other guy when you are in 2nd place? :confused: Talk about arrogant! She lost a lot of people with that blunder. I've not looked back since then or felt bad for switching to Obama.
     
  7. Principessa

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    Yup, I was saying the exact same thing in chat about 6 hours ago. I'm sorry but any black person who earns under $5,000,000.00 a year needs to be a registered Democrat. :cool: The Republican party hasn't done a damn thing for people of color in over 100 years.

    Ambivalence at this point is beyond stupid. If you don't know who to vote for by now then your right to vote should be stripped away and given to someone who committed a minor felony.

     
  8. B_VinylBoy

    B_VinylBoy New Member

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    Originally was a Hillary supporter. And Obama was always my second choice for president, so now that he's poised to win it suits me just fine. Glad to see that some people share my same opinion when it comes to some of these "undecided" or "independent" voters.
     
  9. trumasseur

    trumasseur New Member

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    Senator Obama from the get-go! Hillary is too much like my ex-wife and McCain like my crazy uncle Ed...come to think of it, all of the republican presidential candidates remind me of various eccentric relatives.
     
  10. D_Davy_Downspout

    D_Davy_Downspout Account Disabled

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    Liked Ron Paul because he was actually conservative, and was honest about our foreign policy in the early debates.

    Then I realized he was a lunatic and switched to Obama.
     
  11. Flashy

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    you are joking, right QT?

    that is an utterly perplexing statement.


    Are you familiar with the Civil Rights Act of 1964?

    these were the vote totals

    Vote totals

    Totals are in "Yea-Nay" format:

    • The original House version: 290-130 (69%-31%)
    • The Senate version: 73-27 (73%-27%)
    • The Senate version, as voted on by the House: 289-126 (70%-30%)

    [edit] By party

    The original House version:[9]

    • Democratic Party: 152-96 (61%-39%)
    • Republican Party: 138-34 (80%-20%)
    The Senate version:[9]

    • Democratic Party: 46-21 (69%-31%)
    • Republican Party: 27-6 (82%-18%)
    The Senate version, voted on by the House:[9]

    • Democratic Party: 153-91 (63%-37%)
    • Republican Party: 136-35 (80%-20%)



    i am shocked QT....I know that the current republican party bears little resemblance to the GOP, but the Southern Democrats were the most vicious, racist party around....Strom Thurmond was a democrat!


    Robert Byrd, Democrat of KKK fame, spent 14 hours trying to fillibuster the Civil Rights Act, when it was finally broken by the Republican Sentae Minority LEader Everett Dirksen.

    Are you not familiar with him? he was one of them ost important politicians in the passage of a variety of Civil Rights legislation

    when they invoked cloture and broke Byrd's filibuster Dirksen took to the floor of the senate and stated

    "Victor Hugo wrote in his diary substantially this sentiment, 'Stronger than all the armies is an idea whose time has come.' The time has come for equality of opportunity in sharing of government, in education, and in employment. It must not be stayed or denied."
    considering that the democrats were viciously opposed to it, to a larger extent, the republican support was crucial, and Dirksen was given q national award by the NAACP


    you might want to read up just a little...things are not always as they seem.

    Everett Dirksen and the 1964 Civil Rights Act

    TIME Magazine Cover: Sen. Everett Dirksen - June 19, 1964 - Everett Dirksen - Congress - Senators - Politics


    I am not a republican and don't like what they stand for anymore, but in the terms of things up until around 1980, the GOP was in fact the party that did far more for african americans.




    Republicans started the NAACP and the historically black colleges and universities

    Black Republican James Weldon Johnson was the first black general secretary of the NAACP.
    It was Republican President Richard Nixon who implemented the concept of affirmative action in 1969 that was established by the "Philadelphia Plan” during the Johnson administration which set goals and timetables. Black Republican Art Fletcher revised the original plan and supervised the enforcement of equal opportunities for minorities in federally funded contracts. Art Fletcher was known as “the father of affirmative action enforcement” and advised three presidents – Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford and George H.W. Bush. While Fletcher was head of the United Negro College Fund, he coined the slogan: “A mind is a terrible thing to waste.”
     
  12. whatireallywant

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    At the very, very beginning of the primaries I was for Kucinich, but he dropped out before the primaries ever got to Texas. (I voted for Kucinich in the 2004 primary, too).

    After that, I was for Obama. I would've voted for Clinton if she'd been the nominee though as well, although I got irked with her before the primaries started for her support for sex segregated classes in stuff like math! I can see sex education and physical education being single-sex, but math?! That of course would just reinforce stereotypes about women and math, and the girls would not get as much of an education in that subject as the boys would have gotten. I was shocked that she actually supported this!
     
    #12 whatireallywant, Oct 17, 2008
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2008
  13. ManlyBanisters

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    You have to be joking! Undecided does not mean uninformed. Undecided does not mean unopinionated. Undecided means very often that the person is not writing the race as having been run before the gates are open. Nothing new will be said in the next 2 1/2 weeks? Do you think so? Then you aren't paying attention. Example - in the last couple of weeks the McCain camp has gone after Obama on the 'terrorist' thing - I have been very unimpressed by that but McCain himself has attempted to rise above it - I have been impressed by that. the fact he doesn't appear in control of his own campaign, however, is off putting.

    I'm shocked and surprised at you. The fact that an intelligent person might want to keep their decision til the last moment so they have all possible infomation and have taken the time to digest what has been presented to them is perfectly reasonable.

    Do you not understand the difference between ambivalence and caution? The ambivalent probably will not vote at all.

    As for the comment about all black people who earn under 500,000 voting for the Democrats by default - well that's beyond ridiculous. Voting in a racial block can only serve as a means to one end, the continued polarisation of different racial groups.

    And the pair of you talking down like that ('little weiner', 'right to vote stripped away') to people who may be very reasonably still making their minds up is nasty, bullying behaviour. Everyone has the right to make their own decisions in their own time and in their own way.
     
    #13 ManlyBanisters, Oct 17, 2008
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2008
  14. Industrialsize

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    At this point in the election, if you are "undecided", you haven't been paying attention very well.
     
  15. B_VinylBoy

    B_VinylBoy New Member

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    The Republican of yesteryear may have proposed and passed Civil Rights Legislation, but the current Republican of today doesn't enforce nor share the majority of ideals as their older comrades. Right now, the only thing they have in common is the name.

    Many political analysts think with the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that people saw the writing against the wall (thanks to Civil Rights Leaders like MLK) and acted accordingly. In other words, anyone who was in that position would have proposed & voted for it. As reflected by the poll totals posted earlier since it passed favorably in the senate and the house. And since we all know many people in Congress vote down party lines and barely against them, the fact that Republicans supported the bill more than Democrats is because they fronted the legislation. If it was the other way around, Republicans would have done the same thing.
     
  16. Redsquall

    Redsquall New Member

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    I'm not undecided, by the way. I'm just trying to gauge how many are.
     
  17. Wyldgusechaz

    Wyldgusechaz New Member

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    I am a strict conservative, I will drilled tax wise because I make way over $250K but I think I will vote for Barack. He just seemed more presidential in the last debate.

    It makes no difference tho. There is little a President can do to effect real change.
     
  18. b.c.

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    When I go to the polls to vote I consider two things: the person running for office and the ideology (platform) behind the candidate. Considering current Republican ideology as compared to Democratic principles I would've voted for Hillary had she been nominated with just as much conviction as I will be for Obama.

    Both passionately embody principles that I think are quite honorable ones: a true desire for a better, kinder, prouder America than what we've experienced as of late - better for all of us.

    I believe in all my heart that they are genuinely sincere in wanting that for us. As it turned out, Obama was the nominee, and there is no doubt in my mind that he has carried himself and expressed his vision (and in fact, the hopes and vision of many Americans) quite admirably.

    I'm absolutely certain that if elected he will do us proud. Just as I am equally certain that if not, it would be a missed opportunity for us all, and a sad day in our nation's history.
     
  19. D_Aston Asstonne

    D_Aston Asstonne Account Disabled

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    Agreed!the president is just someone else to blame when everything screws up.All this talk of "change" is just that,without the approval of congress the presidents hands are tied.
     
    #19 D_Aston Asstonne, Oct 18, 2008
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2008
  20. D_Aston Asstonne

    D_Aston Asstonne Account Disabled

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    nope,i still havent "changed" my mind.in fact ,all this constant talk about "change" is what has me fully convinced that mccain is my only choice.
     
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