Here's a thought. I think.

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Drifterwood, Sep 6, 2011.

  1. Drifterwood

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  2. Drifterwood

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    BTW, I am not trying to exclude everyone else from having a POV.
     
  3. ManlyBanisters

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    I agree with him. And I know a lot of teachers who would too - they are very frustrated with the way they have to compartmentalise their students in order to tick all the boxes on the 'you have done your job' list.

    Specifically the grouping by age thing bugs me. If the same amount of effort that is put into getting children to conform to the standard expected of them at age X was put into helping them work out where their strengths lie and helping them exploit that there would be a lot more happy children getting a lot more out of education.

    Of course the thing that video doesn't answer, and maybe Robinson tries to answer it elsewhere, is how. How do we, with the resources we have, provide that kind of tailored education for all children? I have a few ideas and not enough time right now to express them - but the major one is parental involvement. At the moment the system tells parents to hand their kids over to the school at 8.30am / 9am, fuck off to work and then come get their kids in the afternoon / early evening by which point everybody is knackered and just want to watch TV / play DS / whatever. That's a shit system.

    If parents could be rewarded, with tax breaks / financial assistance, for working part time or staying home and being a larger part of their kids education then there would be a lot more one to one teaching going on, a lot more tailored education and a lot more children getting the attention they need from the people they need it from.

    It isn't parents' fault that they have to go out to work - the way the economy works that is required of us. Most of us want to work. I've had such a great opportunity these last few years, working part time from home and being able to pay my own way AND be a full time parent. I'm one of the lucky few - and work is drying up now and I'm being forced to make choices I don't want to. But it's been brilliant for me and brilliant for the offspring. More people and their kids should have this.
     
  4. tiggerpoo

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    WOW, excellent video. I agree.
     
  5. D_Sam Rockswell

    D_Sam Rockswell New Member

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    I second that wow. Thought i was alone in that sort of theory. Hmm. While i don't agree with the video as a whole i do agree with a lot of the points mentioned. Because really....what is true intelligence?
     
  6. SurferGirlCA

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    That's what SAT scores measure, amirite?
     
  7. Ed69

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  8. D_Sam Rockswell

    D_Sam Rockswell New Member

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    The Nine Types of Intelligence
    By Howard Gardner

    1. Naturalist Intelligence (“Nature Smart”)

    Designates the human ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) as well as sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef. It is also speculated that much of our consumer society exploits the naturalist intelligences, which can be mobilized in the discrimination among cars, sneakers, kinds of makeup, and the like.

    2. Musical Intelligence (“Musical Smart”)

    Musical intelligence is the capacity to discern pitch, rhythm, timbre, and tone. This intelligence enables us to recognize, create, reproduce, and reflect on music, as demonstrated by composers, conductors, musicians, vocalist, and sensitive listeners. Interestingly, there is often an affective connection between music and the emotions; and mathematical and musical intelligences may share common thinking processes. Young adults with this kind of intelligence are usually singing or drumming to themselves. They are usually quite aware of sounds others may miss.


    3. Logical-Mathematical Intelligence (Number/Reasoning Smart)

    Logical-mathematical intelligence is the ability to calculate, quantify, consider propositions and hypotheses, and carry out complete mathematical operations. It enables us to perceive relationships and connections and to use abstract, symbolic thought; sequential reasoning skills; and inductive and deductive thinking patterns. Logical intelligence is usually well developed in mathematicians, scientists, and detectives. Young adults with lots of logical intelligence are interested in patterns, categories, and relationships. They are drawn to arithmetic problems, strategy games and experiments.

    4. Existential Intelligence

    Sensitivity and capacity to tackle deep questions about human existence, such as the meaning of life, why do we die, and how did we get here.

    5. Interpersonal Intelligence (People Smart”)

    Interpersonal intelligence is the ability to understand and interact effectively with others. It involves effective verbal and nonverbal communication, the ability to note distinctions among others, sensitivity to the moods and temperaments of others, and the ability to entertain multiple perspectives. Teachers, social workers, actors, and politicians all exhibit interpersonal intelligence. Young adults with this kind of intelligence are leaders among their peers, are good at communicating, and seem to understand others’ feelings and motives.

    6. Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence (“Body Smart”)

    Bodily kinesthetic intelligence is the capacity to manipulate objects and use a variety of physical skills. This intelligence also involves a sense of timing and the perfection of skills through mind–body union. Athletes, dancers, surgeons, and craftspeople exhibit well-developed bodily kinesthetic intelligence.

    7. Linguistic Intelligence (Word Smart)

    Linguistic intelligence is the ability to think in words and to use language to express and appreciate complex meanings. Linguistic intelligence allows us to understand the order and meaning of words and to apply meta-linguistic skills to reflect on our use of language. Linguistic intelligence is the most widely shared human competence and is evident in poets, novelists, journalists, and effective public speakers. Young adults with this kind of intelligence enjoy writing, reading, telling stories or doing crossword puzzles.

    8. Intra-personal Intelligence (Self Smart”)

    Intra-personal intelligence is the capacity to understand oneself and one’s thoughts and feelings, and to use such knowledge in planning and directioning one’s life. Intra-personal intelligence involves not only an appreciation of the self, but also of the human condition. It is evident in psychologist, spiritual leaders, and philosophers. These young adults may be shy. They are very aware of their own feelings and are self-motivated.

    9. Spatial Intelligence (“Picture Smart”)

    Spatial intelligence is the ability to think in three dimensions. Core capacities include mental imagery, spatial reasoning, image manipulation, graphic and artistic skills, and an active imagination. Sailors, pilots, sculptors, painters, and architects all exhibit spatial intelligence. Young adults with this kind of intelligence may be fascinated with mazes or jigsaw puzzles, or spend free time drawing or daydreaming.


    Me talking :) :Just figured that might be a bit helpful.
     
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