History behind beloved and well known foods

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by naughty, May 31, 2008.

  1. naughty

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    How many people here know the history behind how some popular regional dish was created. After having a discussion about the drink popularly known as The Arnold Palmer I decided to look it up to see what the net had to say. I had always grown up knowing it as "Half and Half" Here is what I found :


    Arnold Palmer Recipe by - CHOW
     
  2. Mem

    Mem
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    I saw a documentary about the Chocolate Chip cookie and it was a mistake. The lady who made it thought that the chocolate would melt and become a chocolate cookie.
     
  3. naughty

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    Is that the show on the food channel that talks about famous food treats? I didnt see that one but I've seen a number of those. I guess I wanted to also know if there were regional names for the same thing. In that link I was cracking up that people were arguing about the origin of the drink as I was doing last night! LOL!
     
  4. Mem

    Mem
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    I don't remember where I saw it. It was either Food Channel or the History Channel. The whole hour was about Chocolate Chip cookies, and the Toll-house recipe, etc.
     
  5. B_dumbcow

    B_dumbcow New Member

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    Chocolate brownies are the result of a chocolate cake that got dropped on the floor, or so the legend goes :smile:
     
  6. B_jacknapier

    B_jacknapier New Member

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    The corn dog was invented by the poor son of a native american indian and a chinese railroad worker. Of course he called it a 'maize dog'.

    edit: real dog
     
    #6 B_jacknapier, May 31, 2008
    Last edited: May 31, 2008
  7. D_Jared Padalicki

    D_Jared Padalicki Account Disabled

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    I will make one thing clear gay and gals, the frenchmen will hate me for this, but it's important!
    French fries are NOT french, it's invented in Belgium, NOT france! Is that clear guys and gals:biggrin1:.
    I'm not telling you a lie, it's the truth. So now you could say that you ate some belgian fries :tongue:
     
  8. B_becominghorse

    B_becominghorse New Member

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    The History of Cobb Salad

    Arnold Palmer made me remember seeing this when I made one last summer, but I'd forgotten and thought it had something to do with Ty Cobb.

    The English Bakewell Tart I make all the time, that's the one from Bakewell, England that was once wrongly made with the custardy-almond part on top and the strawberry jam spread onto the shortcut pastry. But it became a huge hit this way, and is very good with some hot Custard Sauce on top. Became more famous than it had been already.

    There are lots of interesting histories, as with Beef Wellington, Oysters Rockefeller, etc.
     
  9. transformer_99

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  10. B_becominghorse

    B_becominghorse New Member

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    Oh yeah, I dig Puttanesca too, and Sophia Loren has great cookbook from few years ago. I believe there's some history of Carbonara in there about coming from WWII and Americans--has to do with the 'bacon and eggs' of Carbonara, and now I realize I haven't made one in the longest time and hardly anything is better.

    I don't know where Steak Pizzaiola originated from, but I first heard Tony Soprano talking about it, and then got the Sopranos Cookbook (this cookbook is GREAT!) and made it, but I always add about 2 cups of fresh basil in the last five minutes of cooking, which makes it fabulous.
     
  11. transformer_99

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    Here's another I like since you mentioned Steak Pizzaiola:

    Recipes - Italian-Stuffed Pork Tenderloin

    Add the red sauce to that as well. That recipe calls for Alfredo sauce.
     
  12. D_Gunther Snotpole

    D_Gunther Snotpole Account Disabled

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    Better for you, Pieter ... they've even been called Flemish fries.
     
  13. Mem

    Mem
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    Has anyone ever eaten Sweetbreads?
     
  14. transformer_99

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  15. Mem

    Mem
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  16. naughty

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    IS that a Christmas roll? THere was a Christmas roll that they featured in the movie, "Like water for Chocolate" that looked amazing.
     
  17. Mem

    Mem
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    I don't know but these were individual rolls, looked like a cross between a kaiser roll and a potato bread roll. Slightly sweetened on the inside and glazed and topped with sugar on top. The word Gloria relates to Heaven. So it would roughly translate to Heaven's Bread.

    Here is a variation that I found online:

    Feather Bread - (very similar to Pan de Gloria)

    2 packages yeast
    1 Tablespoon sugar
    2 cups hot tap water (*)
    6 - 7 cups flour
    1/3 cup sugar
    2 teaspoons vanilla
    1/3 cup oil
    1 Tablespoon salt

    Melted butter for brushing
    Granulated sugar for dusting


    Combine the yeast, sugar and a small amount of the water so that yeast can activate.

    Combine 5 cups flour, the 1/3 cup sugar and salt, mixing thoroughly. Add the yeast water, oil and the rest of the hot water. Mix until all combined.

    Add enough flour to form a soft ball of dough. Knead about 8 minutes on lightly floured surface.

    Grease a large bowl and place over dough let rest 15 minutes.
    Shape into round rolls and let rise until double in size, about 1 hour. Bake in preheated 350o F oven for 25 minutes or until golden.

    Remove from pan brush with melted butter and sprinkle with sugar.
    Enjoy!

    (*) Sonia's note: Make sure that the hot water reads from 110o to 120o F and not higher....If it gets any hotter you can kill the yeast instead of activating it. Use an instant read thermometer - they are quite inexpensive and come in a little tube that clips to the top of your apron or in a pocket, like a pen.

    Another note: I like to shape the rolls and then place them in a round cake or pie tin for the last rising. Let them come together like 'pull bread' and when baked, brush the tops with the butter and sprinkle the sugar on the whole thing. Serve in a plate or round basket and everyone can 'pull' their piece...I like the middle one!

     
  18. naughty

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    No,

    The Christmas roll in "Like water for Chocolate" looked like streudel or Stollen. It w literally rolled up like a jelly roll and filled with preserved fruits and nuts and then iced.
     
  19. dong20

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    Hot crossed buns:

    "At the feast to Eastre*, an ox was sacrificed and the image of his horns carved into ritual bread - which evolved into the twice-scored Easter biscuits we call 'hot cross buns.' In fact, the word 'bun' derives from the Saxon for 'sacred ox,' 'boun.'" Sacred Origins of Profound Things. A cross bun kept from one Good Friday to the next was thought to bring luck, the buns were supposed to serve as a charm against shipwreck, and hanging a bun over the chimney piece ensured that all bread baked there would be perfect. Another belief was that eating hot cross buns on Good Friday served to protect the home from fire." ~ Hallmark Press Room.

    * I also read that the cross was meant to represent, also in the context of Saxon Goddess Eostre (her name supposedly the derivation of the word Easter), the four phases of the moon. According to the OED, the term itself dates from the mid 18th Century.

    Whatever, they're yummy, even a year old (maybe).
     
  20. B_dumbcow

    B_dumbcow New Member

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    I had some kind of sweet bread at a Spanish monastery in the mountains a couple of years ago. They were long rolls which were soft and sweet, with a lot of very powdery sugar sprinkled on top. It was the most lovely bread I have ever had :smile: And the most breath-taking place I've ever had the pleasure to be.
     
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