how do you deal old dog(canine)

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by nedly32, Sep 14, 2010.

  1. nedly32

    nedly32 New Member

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    my 16 almost 17 year old best freind et is not doing well and i have troble dealing with his decline in health. hes a small mexican hairless that we adopted about ten years ago. he came to us from a really bad family that shot be-bes in him and negleted him. so the past ten years we have made up for his lost time by loveing and spoiled him to the point that he ran the show and he was king of the house but he still is nothing but pure love and now things are getting tough .et can barly stand he is just happy being on my lape et has always been a loyal pal but liked his own space now hes all about me ,cant get thing done his self like bathroom without being held now i dont mind him needing help he eats like a little piggy like alway but bu i know its just going to get worse so what have others out there that love there pet as much as people have done or delt with this with there beloved freinds i ve never had to put to death a pet .is it really peaceful for the pet ? did you stay whith them when it was done? and what can i do to make ets life now till that time what did you do?
     
  2. helgaleena

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    It is one of those things to lose a pet. My family keeps ferrets and they live a much shorter time than dogs or cats, but they have just as much heart and personality! Since the 90s we have owned at least fifteen, and they have died from sudden illness, old age, horrid accidents, you name it but it never gets easier.

    I have had to deal with senile old lady ferrets who went blind and lost the use of their hind quarters and needed constant cleaning up after themselves. I have old man ferrets just keel over dead halfway across the living room. I have had ferrets crawl away into inaccessible corners to die, had ferrets breathe their contented last in my arms. I have had ferrets cremated by the vet and also buried ferrets with full honors in the hedgerow.

    I think the best way to deal is to treat the aging pet with the same compassion you would treat an old uncle or aunt, as a family member who is just a bit smaller.
     
  3. The_Judge

    The_Judge New Member

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    Been there, done that WAY too many times. It's never easy, and if you have a brain and a heart, you'll cry. But, yes, it is peaceful, seemingly like going under anesthetic (if you've ever experienced surgery). There's no signs of pain, just a rapid fade and they're gone in an instant. Do be there -- you must -- you'll hate yourself if you're not. It's painful to witness, but not as painful as the thought of not holding your beloved friend as he sheds his mortal coil. And in the end you'll know you've ended his pain and done the right thing. Trust me -- I know what I'm talking about.
     
  4. Mem

    Mem
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    When his quality of life is real bad (you don't know how many aches and pains he has all day) the kindest thing to do it put him to rest. Before he goes give him his favorite human meal and maybe some vanilla ice cream or other snack he loves. He'll be in heaven before he goes there.
     
  5. JustAsking

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    Real good advice so far, so I will just reinforce it. The point where you decide to have your pet put to sleep is the point where life is no longer good for your pet. And by good I mean whatever life he can have, given his health problems and still be happy for being a dog.

    This includes anything you might be able to do to accomodate him within whatever limits you define for yourself.

    To give you an example for perspective, I had a really wonderful white German Shepherd that developed hip displasia and a degenerative nerve problem at the same time. The problem manifested itself in a slow degeneration of her using her back legs. Fortunately the pain was mitigated by the nerve degeneration.

    At that time, I had started a business and I was still working out of my home. So it was ok for me to do quite a few things to accomodate her problems than I would have been able to do if I were working 9-5 somewhere in an office. So given that situation, she and I were together for quite a while even to the point where I would take her for walks with a kind of sling affair with handles that I used to hold up her back end. She seemed to be just fine with that arrangement and loved going for walks.

    She was happy with that arrangement for quite a while until her problems turned internal and it was obvious she was starting to be uncomfortable and unhappy being alive.

    So we finally made the decision to take her to the vet to put her to sleep.

    I was lucky to be able to do a lot with her becasue of my working situation. In other situations, it might not be practical, so you need to make your own decisions on that. And don't forget that you really don't answer to anyone else about that decision. Do what you think is best for your pet and for your family.

    I also agree that you should be there when it happens. The vet gives the dog a sedative and then some other kind of shot. The dog peacefully fades away while you are soothing it along. The soothing part is more for your emotional benefit because the dog is not anxious and seems unaware that it is not simply going to sleep.

    These days, the vet can cremate the dog and give you the ashes in a day or two. We buried the ashes in our garden.

    Good luck on whatever decisons you make. These are your decisions to make and you don't have to answer to anyone else about them. Do what you think is best after getting some helpful advice.
     
  6. witch

    witch Member

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    I have had many pets that when the time came I had put to sleep, it's never easy but they trust you to do what's best.

    a couple of shots ..one puts them to sleep and the next stops the heart in seconds. one minute they are sleeping in your arms, they relax and are "gone" ..................... then I cry my heart out
     
  7. B_subgirrl

    B_subgirrl New Member

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    I have not yet had to witness the death or long-term illness of any of my animals. I dread the day when it happens. My heart goes out to you nedly.

    My best friend however, has had to put three pets to sleep in just over a year and a half.

    She was there for two of them, and still wishes she could have been there for the third (she was in hospital at the time). Both times were terribly sad, but also very peaceful. She said it was just like watching them go to sleep. Neither of them lost control of their bowels (something that she had been worried about) and neither pet seemed scared or upset in any way. One thing that did disturb her was that their eyes didn't close. I think she would be more prepared for it if there is ever a next time, but because she wasn't ready for it, she found it upsetting.

    Emotionally she felt rather upset because SHE was the one who was making the decision to have them put to sleep - in her words 'Who am I to decide that their life should end?' But if you are doing it because your pet is suffering, it is the right decision.

    I think one of the big reasons why this sort of thing is so difficult for us, is because most humans fear death and wonder about what comes afterwards. Pets don't seem to have a concept of death and a time after death, and it is unlikely that they fear it.

    And something I read recently made me feel a little better about the idea of having to put a pet to sleep - our pets are lucky because they can escape the pain and suffering that comes with chronic illness, leading to death. Humans (except where euthanasia is legal) just have to keep suffering until they die naturally.

    Again my heart goes out to you. I can't imagine the pain this must cause you.
     
  8. Penis Aficionado

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    Sorry for what you're going through. What everyone else said about the actual process of putting a pet to sleep is correct. The vet gives the animal two shots, it goes to sleep instantly and then its heart stops within a few seconds. Of course it's sad because that's your beloved friend, but the event itself is not at all traumatic.

    You know your dog better than anyone -- spend as much time with him as you can, look into his eyes and sit quietly with him and you will know when he doesn't want to be here anymore. Until that time just give him as much attention and affection as you can, as well as lots of his favorite treats.

    It's hard when the time comes, but you will get through it. Bless you for giving your dog such a happy life.
     
  9. Penis Aficionado

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    Another thing I meant to add -- a good vet should come to your house to do it. If for some reason your vet won't, ask them to recommend a mobile vet. My cat who died last year hated going to the vet, and I would not have wanted his last moments to take place there. Of course dogs can be totally different -- some of them even like going to the vet.
     
  10. justmeincal

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    We had to put our 14yo. shepard/rottweiller down a couple of weeks ago. He had hip displasia and there was nothing we could do but let him go.

    I held him in my arms while my partner petted him. The vet gave him the shot and he went to sleep and passed on.

    You have to do what's best for your friend and not let you feelings get in the way.

    Be prepared to cry a lot. Nothing wrong with that, it just proves how much you loved your friend.

    Good luck.
     
  11. petite

    petite New Member

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    Your OP made me cry. I've never had to put a pet down. The dog I grew up with went to live with my grandfather when I went to college and she lived a wonderful life as his constant companion until she died. My dog now is only a few years old, but she's by my side every day and she's so precious to me. Her heart is so huge it makes me wonder how it's possible that it can fit into such a tiny body.

    Your OP reminds me of one of the worst dreams I've had in the past few months. It was a dream about my dog dying. I woke up crying and I felt terrible all day. It really was just the worst dream.

    My heart goes out to you. It's such a hard decision, but it sounds like you are doing the best thing for your friend. It's obvious how much you love your dog.
    I would spoil your dog with some delicious food beforehand and hold him and be with him when he goes.

    I am so sorry that you are losing such a wonderful companion.
     
  12. CUBE

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    When I put my dog down many years ago it was of course difficult. But she was in pain and I thought... "she has always trusted me to love her and do the right thing by her so this is still part of that deal." I had to understand that it was more important for her to be out of pain and free then my need to hold on to her to avoid pain..which really I was in pain anyway. She had a hell of a good life and in her passing I understood there must be something beautiful we go on to in some way shape or form. No humans passing ever brought me this feeling. The day was hard but it was 100% right. I only wish we humans got the same respect in the end too. Good journey
     
  13. nedly32

    nedly32 New Member

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    thank you all for shareing with me about somthing as personal and heart renching as losing a beloved pet and it really gave me alittle peace of clearty as to what to expect and what will be the right thing for et when it his time,the past few days et seems to be doing alittle better but i realize that it is only temperary so im enjoying those moments to the fullest with my baby boy et thank you all so dearly ned
     

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  14. TomCat84

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    I had to put down my kitty cat in May 2007- his intestines had basically stopped working, and had been unable to pass a BM for some time. It was the hardest thing I've ever had to do- I had had that cat since I was 12. I sat there in that room at the vet's (they scheduled those things for the last appointment in the day on Saturdays if possible) for a good half hour, bawling my eyes out. He was a good boy :(

    This thread made me start crying again
     
    #14 TomCat84, Sep 19, 2010
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2010
  15. JustAsking

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    nedly,
    Thanks for posting the picture of dryer dog.
     
  16. petite

    petite New Member

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    That's an adorable photo! I'm glad that it looks like you're going to have a few more good days to share with your friend.
     
  17. hud01

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    When I had to put my 16 year old dog down it was probably the most traumatic day of my life. It was ten times as painful as my father dying.

    I agree with the others posters. When your pet is in pain and/or can't enjoy life it is time. It doesn't mean they have to be able to do everything they did when they were young, if he is happy in your lap but has trouble walking personally I would wait, but if all they have is misery.....

    This may seem cold, but after you put your dog down, whether it is now or two years from now, mourn for a while, but as soon as you feel a little more at peace go to a shelter and get a new friend. There are so many who need your loving. It will make you happier and you probably saved an animal's life.
     
    #17 hud01, Sep 20, 2010
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2010
  18. hud01

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    That makes two of us.
     
  19. The_Judge

    The_Judge New Member

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    Our beloved dog Chelsea was put to sleep on Wednesday, August 18, 2007. She was pushing 14, as far as we know (Chelsea was a rescue dog), and had been quite active, alert, and in pretty good health until a few days before her passing. Below is a link to a photo of her in our pool, doing what she considered to be swimming.

    Early in the morning of Wednesday, August 15, 2007, Chelsea threw up. That's not an unusual event, as any dog lover knows, but she became very lethargic and we realized that it was much more serious than usual. I was able to get an 8:30 a.m. appointment with the vet that morning, and she quickly determined that Chelsea was in significant trouble -- dehydrated, intestinal pain, low blood pressure, and elevated temperature. She referred us to the regional animal emergency hospital, and by the time I got her there, Chelsea was nearly dead, in "crisis" to use the doctors' term. They were never able to determine the cause, but concluded that she was either in anaphylactic shock from an insect or spider bite, or had a massive bacterial infection akin to E. coli. Things were made worse by Chelsea's age and chronic condition, Addison's Disease (adrenal insufficiency), which compromised her ability to fight whatever had insulted her system. She ended up in the equivalent of intensive care. She apparently wasn't in much pain, but she was totally enervated, barely aware of her surroundings.

    The doctors were able to get her past the infection, but the complications persisted. They discovered an underlying heart condition that probably had been exacerbated by the situation, or perhaps the result of a heart attack. In any case, it left her with about 50 percent of normal heart function. Although that might have been treatable with heart medications once the other problems were overcome, the doctors said that she would be severely weakened and would require frequent monitoring, that the quality of her life would be poor, and that she most likely would live no more than 6 to 9 months in that condition.

    Given that prognosis, we made the hard decision to stop Chelsea's suffering. My wife and I were able to be with her at the end that morning. She was able to walk a bit and seemed to recognize us, but it was obvious that it would be cruel to keep her going. Her end was quick and as gentle as possible.

    We were extremely lucky to have had Chelsea in our lives for the last 11 years. She was the sweetest, smartest, most loving and gentle dog I've ever known. We miss her more than I can begin to tell you.

    BTW, Chelsea's hospitalization cost nearly $8,000, and believe me, I don't regret a penny of it.

    Chelsea "Swimming"
     
  20. Rikter8

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    Ned,

    Try to think of it as that they lived a long good loving life with you.
    Don't prolong suffering. If they are failing, do the humane thing and put them to rest.
    You will feel much better knowing they didn't have to suffer to death.

    I had to put mine down last year. He was 9. Too early.
    I was with him at the vet. He was stuck to me like glue... nervous as was I.
    I had the vet give him an injection to knock him out, before they administered the lethal injection. It's the most humane way you can do it, and you will know that they pass peacefully.
    He was my child, and a larger part of me than I had thought.
    He had internal bleeding from a large tumor on his liver. He was bleeding out on the inside, and it was cancerous. I couldn't make him suffer through a surgery, recovery, and then the poor life of medications and issues related to cancer.

    Something that should be said - like humans, when pets expire, some do nothing, others loose control of their bladders and bowels within minutes. Keep this in mind when you are putting your dog down or they are expected to expire.
     
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