How do you return your DNC card?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Notaguru2, Jan 3, 2009.

  1. Notaguru2

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    I've been a long time Democrat (I know you're surprised). lol After this election, I decided that I no longer want to be a card carrying member of the DNC. I am an Obama supporter, but I am finding more and more that I am at odds with the DNC on.

    I'd like to change my status to either independent, or undeclared. How exactly do you do that? I can't find a way on the DNC website to cancel my membership.

    Is this a matter of voter registration?
     
  2. kalipygian

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    There is no such thing as a DNC card. Your state voter registration card shows how you are registered. You have to change it with them. Don't know how it is done in your state, but here to vote the R ballot in the primary, you have to be registered R, independent, or undeclared.
     
  3. Notaguru2

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    I was figuratively speaking in reference to a "card". BUT! Thanks. Its sounds like I just need to register again. Thanks for your help.
     
  4. Guy-jin

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    Yeah just reregister as "Nonpartisan" or Independent".

    Check the rules in your state, though. For some elections, especially some primaries, being "Nonpartisan" and/or "Independent" means your vote doesn't count. You may want to consider that before you do so.
     
  5. mindseye

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    After you've re-registered, consider writing the DNC to tell them why.
     
  6. D_Martin van Burden

    D_Martin van Burden Account Disabled

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    And, hey, enlighten us while you're at it. Could be a good discussion. Why do you feel disenchanted with the Democratic Party? (For the record, I feel like I'm stuck with 'em so long as the electoral college / two major party system stands.)
     
  7. str8up8x6

    str8up8x6 New Member

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    You need to change your registration with the State, that's easy enough to do. You can change your affiliation to independent like I did. However, once you register as independent you won't be able to vote in primary elections only in the general election. In order to vote in Democratic or Republican primary you have to pick a party affiliation. You should also look into the Libertarian party, which is neither Dem nor GOP. Nothing prevents you, however, from donating to particular candidates whatever their affiliation or even to the DNC or RNC. You should not expect to be in agreement with any party 100%, they are made up of diverse groups with different interests. Usually the group or person with the most money wins.

    Here are a few links to Libertarian publications:
    Reason Magazine
    Free State Project Home [ Free State Project - Liberty in Our Lifetime ]
    The Cato Institute
     
  8. transformer_99

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    By registering Independent, you lose your right to vote in a Presidential primary for whichever party you were registered. Your only shot is the actual final election. So basically you have even less of a choice or even voice to determine even who one party has as their Presidential candidate. I realize that it's a matter of not agreeing with your own party, but there has to be something worthy within either party that would keep you registered ? You can always vote whatever your convictions are in the end. But giving up your right to even show up for the preliminaries, I'd think that would be a shame to give that right up so easily over a party affiliation/declaration ? Being an Independent prior to Nov. 04, 2008, in the end you would have the choice of Obama, McCain and/or whoever else were the Independents, so what's the difference ?
     
  9. B_Nick4444

    B_Nick4444 New Member

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    :You_Rock_Emoticon:
     
  10. Pitbull

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    You reregister.

    But as others have pointed out you may not be able to vote in the primary.
    It may come as a surprise or even a shock to many that I was a registered Democrat for many year. The reason was that I lived in Washington DC which is a one party town. Whoever wins the Democratic primary wins the general election. If I wanted a vote that counted I had to vote in the democratic primary. Needless to say I disagreed with and wasn't happy with most of the positions of my party. I might add that I disagree with and am not happy with most of the positions of my present party - Republican - in case you were wondering. The only reason I have a party affiliation is to vote in the primary.
    (Wasn't able to push Ron Paul over the top with my vote though).

    Another thing to consider is that as a registered Democrat you have access to the party and are more likely to be listened to.
    Imagine for a moment that you called the DNC and said I'm a registered (Independant, Libertarian, Socialist, Republican) and I don't like XYZ.

    My 2 cents
     
  11. Channelwood

    Channelwood New Member

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    No, it varies from state to state depending on the type of primary system the state employs. Typically state primary systems are classified as Open, Semi-open, Semi-closed, or Closed, but even within that general framework there are nuances that you have to look into yourself for where you reside.

    I take the fun route and have been registered as a Republican even though I rarely agree with anything the Republican Party represents. It gives me the chance to affect the general elections much more by "supporting" the candidates I most think will lose the general election. And in my heavily Democratic city, during the Presidential caucuses, I made up 25% of my precinct, and was able to sway another 25% (one guy) to voting my way for Romney (who I felt was more likely to lose the general election than McCain). Additionally, I was able to sway most of the other 3 people in my precinct to vote against the most onerous of the platform points.
     
  12. D_Fiona_Farvel

    D_Fiona_Farvel Account Disabled

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    It does vary by state, however, as someone that has always voted as nonpartisan in California, it is not that your vote doesn't count, rather, your ballot is different and excludes primary options.

    In fact, if there isn't some other measure up for vote, I never even receive a primary ballot. A few years ago the state added something where you can declare a party affiliation just for primaries, but I’m no sellout. :09:
     
  13. Guy-jin

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    Actually, that's not accurate. :redface:

    California Secretary of State - Elections & Voter Information Decline to State - Voter Information

    If the party allows it, a Nonpartisan can vote in the primary for a candidate in California.

    Like I said, better check with your state to find out where it stands before making a big decision!

    (Oops.)
     
    #13 Guy-jin, Jan 4, 2009
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2009
  14. D_Fiona_Farvel

    D_Fiona_Farvel Account Disabled

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    Other than we (nonpartisans) no longer have to send back a form declaring the party we are voting for in primaries, which part is inaccurate? :confused:


    "Decline to State" Voters - Voting in the Upcoming 2008 Statewide Direct Primary Election

    If you are a voter who has declined to state an affiliation with a political party, you may be able to vote for a candidate of a specific party in the upcoming June 3, 2008 Statewide Direct Primary. You may request, from your county elections official or at your polling place, the ballot of a political party if authorized by the party's rules and duly noticed by the Secretary of State. Click here to obtain county elections office contact information.

    If you do not request such a ballot, you will be given a nonpartisan ballot, containing only the names of all candidates for nonpartisan offices and measures to be voted upon at the primary election.
     
  15. Cowabanga

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    For many the votes start at whoever win the primaries for the party. use to be that people started from the grassroots, but most of us got too busy to pay attention to that and we end up chosing the one with the most money from corporation. Consider not changing party but get involve in choosing your grassroots candidate.

    This applies to both party, because they are really not that much different, other than voting for the lesser evil.
     
  16. D_Chaumbrelayne_Copprehead

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    I'm wondering if the OP had issues not just with being a party member, but also with getting fundraising calls, letters and email from the Dems.

    I am a registered Independent here in Georgia, because you don't have to be in a party to vote in a primary. I used to switch party registration in another state I used to live in, so that I could vote for the person I wanted to vote for in the primaries.

    As a result, I've gotten tons of fundraising requests from both sides! I tell both sides to take me off their lists, that I'm not interested, and don't want to be called or emailed.

    However, telling them to stop bugging you for money is not the same as not being a party member. If you wanted to remain a Democrat but just avoid fundraising BS, that's OK. They won't cancel your voter registration if you don't want to contribute! :wink:

    Finally ... if NOT being a party member means you DON'T get to vote in the primary ... think about your OWN self interest. The two big political parties know that there are plenty of people registered with each party who are lukewarm on their general principles. And that is, in large part, because in many states you have to register as a Democrat or Republican to vote in the primary.
     
  17. B_starinvestor

    B_starinvestor New Member

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    One of the top posts in LPSG history.
     
  18. Notaguru2

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    I've been a life long Democrat, but I feel that the party is moving in a direction that we cannot sustain. I have the same view of the GOP. I feel like the parties are ruled by ideologs that are worried more about the platform, than the country some times.

    I've never cast a vote for a GOP candidate, except in a local election.

    I see a lot of State's rights issues becoming the centerpiece for the DNC platform. I understand that people need healthcare, I understand that women need abortions, I understand the pivotal issues facing our country today, but I simply believe that we are overstepping as a government.

    I am with Obama on his foreign policy. I am with Obama on redployment. I am with Obama on trimming pork from our spending bills. I am with Obama on building a bi-partisan government franchise. When it comes to government issues, I am in lock step with him.

    We disagree on social issues. Its not the taxpayer's obligation to provide healthcare to uninsured Americans. If State's want to do that, then go ahead. Tennessee has TennCare and we don't even have a State income tax.

    I don't believe that a woman's right to choose is a federal issue. Government should not be in the business of telling you what you can do with your body. State's should make this determination and adopt laws to reflect their constituent's desires. I am pro-life, with some exceptions. Wholesale abortion shouldn't be on the agenda of our government, nor should the government have to pay for abortions for lower income women.

    I could keep going down the list, but the bottom line is that I am more of a conservative (blue dog) democrat. Most of the blue dogs left the party long ago and went Libertarian, but I stayed around. Obama inspires me, but I wouldn't rubber stamp anything for him.

    Thats sort of my view. A lot of people won't agree with me, but thats ok. I donated the maximum to Obama's presidential campaign and I have no regrets. Let's cross our fingers now and hope he pulls this off.
     
  19. Guy-jin

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    The first half of your original post is inaccurate.

    You said:

    "It does vary by state, however, as someone that has always voted as nonpartisan in California, it is not that your vote doesn't count, rather, your ballot is different and excludes primary options."

    A nonpartisan can get a primary ballot with primary options in California if he or she chooses to do so and the party he or she wants to vote in the primary for allows it.

    If you're nonpartisan and you voted using the Democratic ballot in the primary last year, your ballot was no different from the ballot Democrats used, and your vote counted.

    If you're nonpartisan and you voted using the Nonpartisan ballot, the options weren't there. But a nonpartisan can choose to use a ballot from a party that allows it if he or she chooses to.

    So the ultimate point is that being nonpartisan in California, at least, doesn't necessarily bar one from voting in a primary. In other states, however, it does.

    What you meant to say was, "As someone who has always voted using the nonpartisan ballot in California...", which then would have made the statement accurate. :tongue:
     
  20. Guy-jin

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    Before you get your hopes up, if he's like myself and many others, he's at least as disenfranchised with the Republicans as he is with the Democrats. :tongue:
     
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