How Is The U.S. and Europe Responsible Fot The Cartoons??

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Pappy, Feb 11, 2006.

  1. Pappy

    Pappy Member

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    [​IMG]News > By Category > International News [​IMG]Iran Blames U.S., Europe in Cartoon Crisis

    Published: 2/11/06, 8:47 PM EDT

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    AP - 2/11/06 [​IMG] Iran: U.S., Europe Should Pay for Drawings
    [​IMG]TEHRAN, Iran (AP) - Iran's hard-line president on Saturday accused the United States and Europe of being "hostages of Zionism" and said they should pay a heavy price for the publication of caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad that have triggered worldwide protests.
    Denmark - where the drawings were first published four months ago - warned Danes to leave Indonesia, saying they faced a "significant and imminent danger" from an extremist group and announced it had withdrawn embassy staff from Jakarta, Iran and Syria.
    Yemen announced that three chief editors of privately owned Yemeni papers will stand trial for printing the Danish cartoons and their publishing licenses suspended. They Information Ministry officials said the editors are charged with offending the prophet of Islam and violating religions.
    Earlier this month, two Jordanian editors were put on trial for reprinting the Danish caricatures of Muhammad.
    Saudi Arabia's top cleric said in a Friday sermon that those responsible for the drawings should be put on trial and punished.
    Muslims in several European and Asian countries, meanwhile, kept up their protests, with thousands taking to the streets in London's biggest demonstration over the issue so far.
    Last week, demonstrators in tightly controlled Iran attacked the Danish, French and Austrian embassies with stones and firebombs and hit the British mission with rocks.
    Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who is at odds with much of the international community over Iran's disputed nuclear program, launched an anti-Israeli campaign last fall when he said the Holocaust was a "myth" and that Israeli should be "wiped off the map."
    In a speech marking the 27th anniversary of the Islamic Revolution Saturday, Ahmadinejad linked his public rage with Israel and the cartoons satirizing Islam's most revered figure.
    "Now in the West insulting the prophet is allowed, but questioning the Holocaust is considered a crime," he said. "We ask, why do you insult the prophet? The response is that it is a matter of freedom, while in fact they (who insult the founder of Islam) are hostages of the Zionists. And the people of the U.S. and Europe should pay a heavy price for becoming hostages to Zionists."
    The drawings - including one that depicts the prophet with a turban shaped like a bomb with a burning fuse - were first published in September and recently reprinted in other European publications that said it was an issue of freedom of speech.
    Islam widely holds that representations of the prophet are banned for fear they could lead to idolatry.
    Iran, a predominantly Shiite Muslim country, has seized on the caricatures as a means of rallying its people behind a government that is increasingly under fire from the West over its nuclear program.
    Shiite Muslims do not ban representations of the prophet and some in Iran's provincial towns and villages even carry drawings said to be of Muhammad. But Tehran said the newspaper caricatures were insulting to all Muslims.
    Austrian Foreign Minister Ursula Plassnik said on behalf of the European Union that Ahmadinejad's remarks should not be silently accepted.
    "These remarks stand in complete contradiction to the efforts of numerous political and religious leaders who after the events of the past few days are campaigning for a dialogue between cultures that is marked by mutual respect," Plassnik said.
    Plassnik was referring to appeals for calm made in recent days by Arab governments, Muslim clerics and newspaper columnists who fear the sometimes deadly violence has only increased anti-Islamic sentiment in the West.
    Norway's ambassador to Saudi Arabia apologized on Saturday for the "offense" caused when a Norwegian newspaper published caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad.
    Denmark, which has been stunned by the wave of protests over the caricatures that first appeared in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten in September, urged its citizens on Saturday to leave Indonesia as soon as possible, saying they were facing "a significant and imminent danger" from an unnamed extremist group.
    The warning came hours after the ministry said it withdrew Danish staff from Indonesia, Iran and Syria.
    The Danish ambassador to Lebanon left last week after the embassy building in Beirut was burned by protesters.
    Jyllands-Posten has apologized for offending Muslims but stood by its decision to print the drawings, citing freedom of speech.
    The newspaper's culture editor, Flemming Rose, who was in charge of the drawings, went on indefinite leave Thursday, but many Muslims said that would do little to quell the uproar.
    The paper has denied that Rose was ordered to go.
    "He was not forced out," the paper's spokesman Tage Clausen told The Associated Press in Copenhagen. "He's on vacation, that's all."
    Saudi Sheik Abdul Rahman al-Seedes, the imam of the Grand Mosque in Mecca, called on Muslims to reject apologies for the "slanderous" caricatures.
    "Is there only freedom of expression when it involves insults to Muslims? he said in his sermon, which was published Saturday in the Al Riyad daily.
    Noisy but peaceful rallies also were held in Turkey, Indonesia, the Netherlands, Germany, France, Switzerland and elsewhere, although the Middle East was largely calm.
    Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono said the caricatures were damaging attempts to blend the Muslim faith with democracy.
    "It sends a conflicting message to the Muslim community: that in a democracy it is permissible to offend Islam," the U.S.-educated leader wrote in a commentary that appeared Saturday in the International Herald Tribune.
    _____
    Associated Press writer Karl Ritter contributed to this report from Copenhagen, Denmark.
     
  2. D_alex8

    D_alex8 Member

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    Because rhetoric is cheap, and "U.S. and Europe" points blame at the 'usual enemies' rather than saying 'Denmark'.
     
  3. rawbone8

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    The charm is that propaganda works for these leaders, and they are harnessing untold power from the masses whilst diverting attention from their own shortfalls and crimes as leaders. It's all been seen before.

    Responsibility is moot here. It's who is in control of communication and fanning the fury. I'm sure there are some intellectuals in Muslim countries who are cringing at the results. The mobs are acting just like the violence the cartoon is satirizing. When people hold banners in the streets threatening Europe will get its 9-11 they don't see the irony at all.

    Very dangerous prospects. Recruitments must be going up.
     
  4. D_Barbi_Queue

    D_Barbi_Queue Account Disabled

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    it's b/c we haven't bombed them yet in retaliation. :rolleyes:
     
  5. jakeatolla

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    Not a bad idea .........
     
  6. maxman

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    was it meant to be an insults to all Muslims or to one person or person... are they so high and mighty standing behind a religion that no one can say they might be wrong...
    dont think so.. but ofcourse they do..as they dont wont to loose their position... yeah eat the grapes while the rest eat hay.. (nicer word)
    no one is above approach...we are mortal and human..and that person probably has more skeltons in his closet than most of us... my view... do like they do in Haiti.. put him in the middle of rubber tires and set has ass on fire... if he is a god it wont burn...
     
  7. D_Humper E Bogart

    D_Humper E Bogart New Member

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    You mean ask a bunch of peasant countries like the UK to fight the ground battle, then bomb them "accidentally" even though they just love to wave the Union Jack in combat.

    I DON'T WANNA DIE!

    ----------------------------
    Maxman, I think your plan has merit. ;)
     
  8. RideRocket

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    The only facet in which the US and Europe are partly responsible for the mass rioting is that our desire for free speech has come full circle. Free speech does not give one the right to yell "Fire" in a movie theater. Instead, it should come with responsibility and accountability. That being said, I don't have a problem with the cartoons being published. Islam, as a whole, does not forbid depictions of Mohammed, only certains sects do.

    Once again we see how diametrically opposed our culture is with theirs. The recent outbursts are but the tip of the iceberg. What's worse, is that the rest of the Muslim population remains silent which implies they condone such behavior. European countries are already making extreme concessions so as not to offend Muslims - where will it stop?

    I stated this in another post, but I find it pathetic that certain media outlets won't publish the cartoons because they wish to be sensitive to their religion. What a bunch of crap! Was it being sensitive to show aspects of Christianity covered in urine or feces?
     
  9. Matthew

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    OK, where in the media did you see these depictions? I read about them, but I never saw a mainstream media outlet who did, or would, show them.
     
  10. RideRocket

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    Although it was a few years back, I seem to remember seeing it in theWashington Post and New York Times. Since it was a while ago, I'm still trying to find which newspapers did it. So far I've found that the Charlotte Observer (NC) and several Ohio newspapers (Columbus and Cincinnati) showed the images.

    Also attached is a screen shot from cnn. com's website of the Virgin Mary covered in feces.

    Here's a link from the NY Times archives about the same picture.
    http://www.nytimes.com/library/arts/092899brooklyn-museum.html
    Although the article discusses removing the item, they still showed the picture.

    Just what I've found thus far. I wanted to post my comments in a timely manner though.
     

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  11. Matthew

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    Wow - I have to say I am stunned that those outlets would actually show the images.
     
  12. RideRocket

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    Exactly. That's why I find it so hypocritical of the press (most anyway) to all of sudden have the urge to be 'sensitive' to the religious beliefs of Muslims.
     
  13. Matthew

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    Well, I have to admit you've got a point there.

    The only thing I would say is that when I'm trying to cool tensions between someone and myself, mocking them is not my first course of action. That being said, of course I believe in free speech, and I also don't pretend that it's the agenda of the press or political decision makers to "cool tensions."
     
  14. Chuck64

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    I swear... I wish the US and EU governments would just override Al-Jazera's satelite signal with lesbian porn and re-runs of 700 club and get the real war started. Like mom always said, the sooner you start, the sooner you finish.

    I'm normally a peaceful person, but it's going to get a lot worse before it gets better.
     
  15. Matthew

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    Too late Chuck, the real war's already started. And with an attitude like that, no question it's going to get worse.
     
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