how much do you use your health insurance?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by B_Marius567, Mar 20, 2010.

  1. B_Marius567

    B_Marius567 New Member

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    how much do you use your health insurance?

    I am 45 and have never needed my health insurance so I do not see what the big deal is.

    My Dad is 86 and takes one pill a day.
     
  2. wallyj84

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    You're the bread and butter of the insurance industry. You pay into the system yet don't cost them a dime.

    The problem is that not everyone is as lucky as you. Some people have medical issues that require the use of insurance. Sadly, sometimes these people find their insurance coverage to be lacking or they outright denied coverage due to preexisting conditions.

    I haven't had to use my health insurance much lately. I'm young and healthy, thankfully.
     
  3. midlifebear

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    I haven't used US Health Insurance for over 20 years. Can't afford it. So, when the opportunity presented itself to become a resident of Spain, I jumped on board. I have regular annual checkups, have had radiation therapy for prostate cancer, knee surgery, currently having physical therapy for the knee and it's all been taken care of because I've paid (heavily) into the government health system by paying taxes. Best medical care I've ever had. Much better than what I was getting in the USA.
     
  4. tat2dqt78

    tat2dqt78 New Member

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    My daughter has major medical issues, we use our health insurance often, and unfortunatly for some very expensive treatments.
     
  5. crescendo69

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    Type I diabetic since 18, here. I had no adult health insurance until 1993, when I applied for the newly formed state sponsored program, TennCare, which was available to the uninsurable with low incomes. Diabetic blindness followed shortly, and Tenncare paid for the operations and better preventive healthcare with specialists. Without this insurance, and a later program that replaced it, my bills for meds, doctor visits, procedures and operations would have completely outweighed the cost of premiums and copays I have paid. I would have been in deep debt. Even now, I still am getting dangerously low in savings due to several job losses.

    I hope I haven't strayed too far off topic.
     
  6. D_Martin van Burden

    D_Martin van Burden Account Disabled

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    I'm 30 years old and the university I work for pays health insurance benefitIs and tuition reimbursement while I'm in the doctoral program. My insurance doesn't include dental or vision benefits, and incidentally, those are the things I use the most so I have to pay for those out of pocket. I got some dental work done that had been long overdue, but it was about $1,000 and I had to get it financed. I pay about $100 for it each month. I'm due for an eye exam in a few months, but I'm trying to figure out how I'll pay for that too.

    Long story short, I grew up learning how to treat colds and stuff at home because doctors were just out of the budget. On a couple of occasions, I checked into an urgent care place, but so long as I can take some Tussin, I'll do fine. :)
     
  7. dandelion

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    Im not sure what to make of that. If the US is full of people being treated by doctors for colds on their medical insurance, then Im not surprised its expensive. A problem the NHS worries about is the 'worried well', which is to say people with nothing particulalry wrong with them who think there might be and go along to find out. Some people need to learn a bit about the merits of a hot toddy (recommended I recall at school by the french master) or other self help. Being in the UK health care is free to use, but I haven't used it much in 45 years. Wouldn't have cost much if I had been paying. Probably Im in the group the NHS would like to see more of to check up on. Dentistry would have cost me more than medicine (which is also NHS but dentists are semi-autonomous practitioners so I tend to think of it differently. Additionally they make small charges for treatment) .

    It strikes me that the cost of a national health system is likely overestimated if you just look at insurance costs, because those of us who stay happily healthy are quite likely to wing it and be over represented amongst those who don't take out insurance.
     
  8. nudeyorker

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    I have excellent insurance, health, dental and vision.
    I'm not on any medication, I have a physical checkup once a year. I get my teeth cleaned twice a year and have my vision checked once a year. I was however very happy to have full hospitalization coverage with my appendicitis surgery 10 years ago.
     
  9. ZOS23xy

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    Health care is an issue of concern. It was suggested that a poll showed that Americans didn't want the issue passed through Congress, but I think the idea is needed. Many Americans can be bankrupted by a single illness.

    Health care is a good idea.

    A couple of decades ago, people were not in the majority over the issue of equal rights. The issue simply is not what the numbers are about, but what justice is about.
     
  10. Industrialsize

    Staff Member Moderator Gold Member

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    Then you are lucky to be in good health. I'm sure you're trying to make a point beyond"How often do you use your insurance". I'd be curious what it is.
     
  11. D_Harvey Schmeckel

    D_Harvey Schmeckel New Member

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    Most years I don't get $1000 in benefits from paying $6000 in premiums. Had an endoscopy this year at $1700 so might get almost half back what I pay in.
     
  12. sargon20

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    Insurance isn't about trying to get back what you put in. If you do you ruin the risk pool. And end up dropped if we're talking private insurance. Health insurance, car insurance, home insurance all the same. Too many claims and you will get dropped. In order for it all to work people who use it frequently have to balance out with people who don't use it. Otherwise you have classic 'death spiral':
    private health insurance only works if insurers can sell policies to both sick and healthy customers. If too many healthy people decide that they’d rather take their chances and remain uninsured, the risk pool deteriorates, forcing insurers to raise premiums. This, in turn, leads more healthy people to drop coverage, worsening the risk pool even further, and so on.

    As the premiums increase, healthy people increasingly flee, unhealthy people remain, average costs increase, the cycle continues and the premiums are further increased. This cycle continues until no one, not even the sick who may strongly want or need it, can afford the policy

     
    #12 sargon20, Mar 21, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2010
  13. dandelion

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    If you put it like you did, I cant understand why anyone in the US likes private insurance. If it wont cover you if you get really sick, whats the point? Insurance in its proper form is insuring against something unlikely but ruinous with a modest regular payment. It begins to sound to me horribly like the US private insurance market might be very keen on a law which obliges people to use its services irrespective of how healthy they are and how much it charges. Is this a bill to guarantee healthcare or guarantee profits? The US health industry seems to have a vested interest in carrying out unnecessary or marginally beneficial procedures.
     
  14. sargon20

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    Most who 'like' it have never had a real serious illness I would surmise. If you have had a serious illness you would be well-informed of where it's deficient with it's co-pays, deductibles, lifetime limits, pre-existing conditions, etc). Also most likely if you are seriously ill you are elderly and on Medicare. Every US politician knows if you touch it you are dead. It's called the 'Third Rail' of politics.

    The law will require all to purchase health insurance insuring a good risk pool.
     
    #14 sargon20, Mar 21, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2010
  15. mizzlopez

    mizzlopez Member

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    My father went 20+ years before having to use his health insurance, now he has bills up the wazoo, in the last two years he has spent close to $8,000 out of his pocket.......He pays $350.00 a month in his company sponsored plan...........Pray that you never get a serious illness....it can be a financial strange.
     
  16. sargon20

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    2/3rd's of all bankruptcies last year were due to medical expenses. I've known so many people who had to make themselves 'poor' to qualify for Medicare or Medicaid just so they wouldn't go broke.
     
    #16 sargon20, Mar 21, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2010
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