Hubble Ultra Deep Field 3D video

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by lucky8, Aug 17, 2009.

  1. lucky8

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    YouTube - The Hubble Ultra Deep Field in 3D

    This is a 3D animation of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field image that was taken in 2004. This image has been claimed as the most important picture ever taken, and someone has taken the time to turn it into an awesome 3D animation. Watch this video remembering that what you are seeing is thousands of galaxies, each full of billions of stars, most of which have planets orbiting around them...and this is only a miniscucle section of the sky.

    It really puts things in perspective if you understand the grandeur of what you're seeing. If anything, it shows us that when it's all said and done, the everyday trials, tribulations, and petty, selfish and mindless "issues" we all seem to care so much about ultimately mean absolutely nothing. ie: the sky is not falling so shut the fuck up. Have a nice day. :smile:
     
  2. clear

    clear Member

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    Lol...

    You're cool man! I remember when I first came across the Hubble Deep Field (and later the Hubble Ultra Deep Field), all those years ago; truly sublime and beyond my realm of description. Thank You for the reposting kind sir!

    It's so comforting to know that others appreciate and recognize the awesomeness of the universe that surrounds us. I am almost compelled to go into some deep or philosophically meaningful rant about both it, and our place within/aside from it, but then that would imply- by inflection -that my rants actually mean something (which most would agree is simply not true, lol).

    Nevertheless, it is always nice when a man is made aware of his true place in the grand scheme of things. It is usually only then- when he is allowed the privilege of truly finding himself -that he actually can (though, if only for that moment, lol).:tongue:

    Regards,

    T.D.

    Ciao-:cool:
     
    #2 clear, Aug 18, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2009
  3. D_Kissimmee Coldsore

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    Imagine what the next generation of telescopes will uncover. I can't wait to see the very infant galaxies of millions of years after the Big Bang!
     
  4. CUBE

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    thanks for sharing
     
  5. Flashy

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    did anyone watch "Alien Earths" on the National Geographic Channel?

    it is no right now!

    *WOW*

    great program...highly recommend it.
     
  6. D_Tintagel_Demondong

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    Thanks, Lucky. That was awesome!

    I am glad that others here share my interest in cosmology. Seeing a cluster of galaxies that were only half a billion years old is fascinating; that's incredibly close to the origin of our universe.
     
  7. Flashy

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    i bought a really super duper telescope a couple years ago as a gift for my parents for their summer home (they pay no attention to astronomy, so i knew only i would use it, heh heh)

    unfortunately, i do not have the scientific intelligence to really get the most out of it, but i have used it and seen some absolutely *INCREDIBLE* stuff...it is automated, has GPS, computerized and everything!

    it is truly amazing (obviously nothing like Hubble though, but when you look at something, and are seeing it with your own eye, it is totally unbelievable...makes you feel very insignificant, but also very fortunate)

    this is the one i got them...

    I highly recommend it!!!

    Celestron 8 Inch CPC Schmidt-Cassegrain Telescope - Telescopes at Telescopes
     
  8. D_Tintagel_Demondong

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  9. Flashy

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    lol...you could visit my folks...but they are really annoying :wink:

    i have figured out alot of the stuff on it, but there are some things that are just way over my head...though, as i said, i have seen some *Unbelievable* stuff out there. really breathtaking.

    I have used smaller telescopes that were much cheaper and really excellent though, too! the Celestron ones were really good, and i bought my friend's son a relatively cheap celestron one for about $200 that was pretty great too!

    i would like to go to a really super observatory just once to check it out...must be amazing!

    i wish i had a brain that was more scientifically oriented, because after a certain level of basic astronomy understanding, it becomes difficult for a novice to grasp the concepts past a basic level. like how stars "wobble", and all this stuff.

    it is really incredible when you listen to these experts speak about astronomy and the galaxy...the breadth of hteir knowledge is really incredible...

    on the show i spoke of that i watched last night "Alien Earth", they had these utterly brilliant folks from Harvard, MIT etc...and they were talking about stuff that was just so amazing...like they had discovered a planet that was *ALL* water...much like earth, but with no land, anywhere...just a purely aquatic planet...because there was no land, the depth of water also went threee times deeper than earth's deepest oceans, but also, there was very little wind, and because the whole planet was ocean, and with little wind, the days were almost entirely cloudless, and always perfect and sunny, no matter what...

    it was some really amazing stuff...

    then they talked about "Hot Jupiters", "SuperEarths"...and they said they thought within three years that they would find a planet that was similarly habitable to earth.

    the sheer immensity of what is out there is staggering....cannot imagine what we will discover next.
     
  10. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    You know you need to collimate it every time you use it and let it sit outside a good two hours before using if the indoor/outdoor temperature difference is more than a few degrees? An 8" Celestron is a wonderful instrument but you do need to know how to use it to get the most from it.
     
  11. Flashy

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    in my best Johnny Carson voice..."i did not know that". :redface:

    i have put it out there for awhile while i got ready to look but i have not unfortunately had the kind of time necessary to really use it effectively to its utmost, that i am sure i could if i was anything more than a very novice stargazer.

    i really need to hire some smart kid from a local high school who knows astronomy like the back of his hand to give me a super-tutorial....unfortunately, i just do not always have the time :frown1:
     
  12. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    You can do this rec. Amateurs are a really friendly bunch and many are very happy to show you anything. Contact these guys and see when their next star party is. You'll find all kinds of telescopes from giant Dobsonians to relatively compact Schmidts to traditional refractors to really good binoculars. A pair of 8x10 binoculars are a fantastic investment because there's so much you can see with them. Their wide field of view is much larger than any other telescope's yet their magnification isn't so little that you see no difference. They're perfect for observing God's Joke aka The Coat Hanger aka Brocchi's Cluster.
     
  13. D_Tintagel_Demondong

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    One of my best friends is a member of the Royal Astronomical Society. When we camp, he brings binoculars and we stargaze in the country. I went to one RAS meeting and enjoyed it. I still don't know if I'll become a member. I felt as if I didn't quite fit in, since most were actually in the professional field of astronomy, astrophysics, or cosmology.

    I'll check out the Ottawa Valley Astronomy and Observers Group, Jason. Thanks!
     
  14. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    No need. You can do it yourself rather easily. Here are directions on collimating a Celestron SCT. It's not difficult once you get the hang of it.
     
  15. Flashy

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    they had some really cool photos on their site.

    part of what is so confusing to me is the concept of a "star".

    the Sun is a star...are all stars that we see "suns"?

    also they were saying on the show how there are planets that are "drifters" that are not in the orbit of any stars...

    and then you have moons, which orbit a planet...

    it gets so confusing sometimes.
     
  16. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    Heh, I never join anything (I'm an INTP, remember:tongue:). Start with the amateur groups. Most of them are well-organized and a lot of fun. They're a good way to spend a pleasant evening. I say hook-up with these guys. I wager none of them are RAS members either.

    If you go, be sure to bring a flashlight with a red gel filter rubberbanded around the end or get an astronomical flashlight which as a red diode. Nothing pisses off astronomers more than light pollution. The red filters protect night vision while allowing you to see in the dark. They will love you for it.
     
  17. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    "Sun" is a term we use for our star in the context of it being the star which created and supports our planet. To be a sun, you need to have a planet for the sun to warm and illuminate. All suns are stars but not all stars are suns as not all stars have planets.

    Most stars are relatively simple balls of hydrogen and helium undergoing fusion. That's really all they are. There are a few exceptions but don't worry about that. Stars come in all sizes with smaller stars like our own being the most common. Our sun is a very ordinary star in many ways and, for us at least, that's a good thing.

    Planets are formed when material, ejected by a star undergoing creation, begins to cool and coalesce. Planets form in orbit around a star and take on rounded forms due to the effects of gravity. Unless something violent happens, planets will usually remain in peaceful orbit around a star.

    But not always. Our planet was likely hit early in its life by a large object the size of the moon. That body glanced off earth and the resulting matter ejected from earth formed our moon. What happened to the mystery object is unknown. Some planets, like Pluto, have very irregular orbits that cause them to cross orbits with other planets. We're very lucky that our solar system is so relatively stable. In terms of our galaxy, we're in the exurbs, relatively far away from the galactic center where stars are much closer together and denser. This is a very good thing because a lot of what happens out there could snuff out life very easily. Even then, Earth has been struck by a number of large objects from time to time and twice now we've witnessed Jupiter being hit by comets just in the past 20 years.

    Don't worry too much about a Planet X being out there ready to slam into Earth. There likely is another planet out there, a relatively large one too, because the gravitational effects of all the objects in the solar system don't quite add up. We can tell the effect of gravity on all the large bodies in the solar system and right now there is more force being applied than equations tell us there should be. That means there is more mass in the solar system than we know about and that mass is likely a planet of some sort. We just don't know where to look for it, however it is not close by.
     
  18. Flashy

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    thank you carl sagan :wink:

    did you happen to see the program i mentioned last night? it was really good...it was interesting, as it echoed what you were saying about it being a good thing that our sun is not as powerful, and that we have a stable orbit...

    they were showing a planet that had an unusual orbit (forget what they called it) but during their "summer", the temperatures rose to 800 degrees! no thank you!

    it echoed exactly what you were saying about the creation of the moon etc...it was really interesting


    i always find it hard to believe that there isn't other life out there somewhere...
     
  19. D_Tintagel_Demondong

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    ~Ahems~
     
  20. vince

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    One of the bonus's of going to visit my folks is playing with Dad's telescope. I don't know the spec's but I guess it's 8 inches across and about five feet long! He's an inventor and a master tinkerer and has built all these cool add ons for it. He even built the motion mechanism that tracks the stars and keeps image centred. It's a hobby he's taken up in retirement. He seems to know the skies like the back of his hand. We always check out the rings of Saturn, the moon (amazing detail), and nebulas and shit. Last year we built a eight foot rotating dome for the damn thing! We've got a mini Mount Palomar out behind the guest house! My brother put a crescent moon on the top so the neighbors aren't sure if the folks have gone Mohammadian! LOL (doesn't help that son #3 lives were he does)

    Like you said Flashy, it's cool seeing the stars and planets "live". Knowing that the light entering your eye has just finished journey of a billion years or whatever, is more meaningful than a photo.
     
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