Is there a racial double standard in your election?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Drifterwood, Sep 24, 2008.

  1. Drifterwood

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    I get the impression that there will be Black people voting for Mr. Obama because he is black and it is a milestone to have a black president (I am sure many white people will vote for him for the same reason). But isn't there a bit of a double standard here, because if a white person said that they were voting for McCain because he was white, there would be an uproar?
     
  2. Principessa

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    No, that has been the status quo in this country for centuries. :rolleyes: They might not say it but we all know that's the truth.

    People often vote not based on the issues as they should, but on a perceived similarity between themselves and the candidate. In this country skin color is a biggie. In other countries it's not such a big deal.
     
  3. B_starinvestor

    B_starinvestor New Member

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    I would tend to agree with Njqt here. I would also add that there is a gender issue with Sarah Palin on the Republican ticket.
     
  4. earllogjam

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    There is no double standard here, the racist white people in America would vote for Hitler if he was running against a black man.

    Unfortunately, there is a very large percentage of these bigots, both men and women in too close to call states like Ohio and Florida which gave the election to Bush in 2004.

    It was unfortunate that these bigots and fag haters were drawn out of the woodwork with anti-gay marriage propositions on ballots courtesy of Carl Rove.
     
  5. B_starinvestor

    B_starinvestor New Member

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    C'mon earl. Get out of 1965, and look who's on the Democratic ticket. If anything, he'll pull more black voters. The guy won't be hurt when the dust settles - he'll add votes.
     
  6. Principessa

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    Most definetely! Many of the women who were going to vote for Hillary will be voting for McCain. I call these people Hillocrats.
     
  7. B_starinvestor

    B_starinvestor New Member

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    Oh fooey, njqt.
     
  8. naughty

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    Workin' up a good pot of mad!

    I dont know about that. They may find that their need for a woman who supports their key issues ( reproductive choice,etc) may override their aspirations for a woman second in line to the throne.
     
  9. earllogjam

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    If you think racism is not playing a part in this election you are terribly naive.
     
  10. Phil Ayesho

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    There is one other main difference.

    Voting for Obama because he is black is NOT the same as voting for McCain because he is white...

    Because the truth is that those voting for McCain because he is white are disingenous...
    They would REALLY be voting for McCain because Obama is black.

    And that is a racist agenda.
    It is the furtherance of Jim Crow, of white, male dominance... of status quo...

    Whereas a Black person voting for Obama is voting, at the very least, for greater inclusion of minorities ion the power structure of this nation.

    They are not saying Blacks are better... they are saying Blacks are JUST AS GOOD.
    That is the opposite of racism.

    Whites voting McCain are building a wall.

    Blacks voting Obama are building a bridge.

    And that makes the actions of Blacks voting for Obama, ethical.



    I happen to like Obama for his intelligence, his ability to inspire, ( very like Reagan) and for his Policies...

    But I can say that as a white American, I am also excited to have lived to see a Black man who I feel would do the job well have a solid chance at winning.

    ( would not have voted for Jackson for anything)

    I am just old enough to remember seeing on TV live images of back men hanging from trees.
    I understand exactly Michele Obama's words of finally feeling some pride in how far America has come from that dismal era.


    The First Black president changes the landscape of American politics forever more...


    Just imagine the pressure that will come to bear on Obama to do the job well- to leave the nation in much better shape than he found it... Like Jackie Robinson... his performance will define Black participation at the highest level of government for a generation...

    I honestly believe the best chance we have to pull out of this is to hire the guy who simply can not allow himself to fail.


    I would have been just as proud to vote for Hillary.
     
  11. Qua

    Qua
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    Bullshit. Voting for a candidate solely or largely because he is black may have some glitzier social statement than not voting for someone because he's black, but both are reprehensible. Obviously we as a society have not come far enough to be effectively blind to race, but racial bias is racial bias.

    I saw a group of guys wearing t-shirts with a picture of Obama and Martin Luther King Jr. saying "Fulfill the dream" or something to that effect. I was amazed in all the wrong ways.

    However, you are right in that voting for the guy who cannot allow himself to fail is a very valid point in Obama's favor.
     
    #11 Qua, Sep 24, 2008
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2008
  12. Drifterwood

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    Thanks Phil and everyone else. I'm spending most of the next month with my US buddies, so I need to bone up on some of the issues that no doubt they will be discussing.

    Phil - Isn't there also a slightly different agenda in that I may vote for Mr. Obama because he is black or Mr. McCain because he is not black?
     
  13. Phil Ayesho

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    That is what I meant by those voting for McCain because Obama was black.


    There are lots of non-racial reasons why to vote for Obama or McCain.

    But those that claim they would have voted for Hillary, but will not vote for Obama are voting a skin color issue..
    Because Hillary in the senate and Obama in the oval office would be a strong team for needed change.

    McCain won't even change the outgoing message on the RNC answering machine.
     
  14. flame boy

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    From my point of view (as someone who can't vote as I'm not a US citizen but I have followed this election closely) I think that there is not a racial double standard in this election. However there is obviously some favouritism.

    This is the first time a person of colour has been a candidate therefore it would be impossible to claim that no one would vote for him solely based on the fact he is black - Some people will vote for him for this sole reason, and that is their choice. Just like some people will vote for John McCain simply because he isn't black.

    I do not think however that this is a racial double standard. As a gay person (and I am being very honest here) - if a gay person was to run in an electon I could vote for, I would vote for them simply because they are gay. Minority people will stick together, and speaking personally, when 'one of your own' gets to a point of great success, you will do anything to help them achieve their goal. I would second this by saying that I would obviously check his/her policy and make sure I agree with them.

    Unlike many women are doing with Palin/Clinton. Palin and Clinton are only similar in one thing - gender. This is where the similarities stop. They do not agree on policy and they are as far apart from each other as they could be (Check out the SNL skit for more info, folks!). However some women will vote for McCain/Palin for the same reason as some will vote for Obama/Biden - they want 'one of their own' to do well.

    And I'm spent.
     
  15. Phil Ayesho

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    I disagree... again we are talking about only those voting on the basis of race alone...

    Blacks voting for Obama ARE voting for a larger stake for Blacks in US political policies.
    Breaking the color barrier, alone, is a valid and honorable aim... if only to give other blacks in the future a more level playing field in running for office.

    Whites voting for white can not make any such claim... Their interests are already overly represented, they are not leveling the playing field by trying to keep it skewed in favor of whites....

    hopefully... in the future... when blacks have something more approaching parity in American political culture- blacks voting based on skin WILL be reprehensible.


    But now- just being black, an elected Obama furthers the interests of the Black community.

    That is voting their INTEREST...
     
  16. mindseye

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    This isn't a mere substitution of color, like preferring a red shirt over a blue shirt.

    Voting for Obama "because he is black" is a vote to break down a barrier and to expand opportunity; voting for McCain "because he is white" is a vote to preserve that barrier. (You've acknowledged this in calling an Obama election a 'milestone'.)

    The former is an admirable goal. But it's a flimsy reason to choose a president; would these same people have voted for Alan Keyes or Flavor Flav? On the other hand, the latter is rightfully scorned and worthy of uproar. That's not a double standard.

    As a general rule, I give latitude to barrier-breaking candidates for public office -- not just racial and gender minorities, but deaf candidates and candidates with other disabilities, candidates from under-represented occupations and economic classes, and openly gay candidates. And I'd certainly feel comfortable using one of these traits as a "tie-breaker" between two candidates, both of whom I supported. (I think Pat Schroeder had the potential to be a better candidate than Mike Dukakis, for example.)

    But I wouldn't use race as my first criterion for choosing a candidate, and I hope the numbers of people -- on both sides of the aisle -- who would do so are smaller than the traditional media is portraying.
     
  17. Drifterwood

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    Thank you for the comments.

    Is it then a question of positive discrimination? I see the racial choices as

    Because he's black
    Because he isn't white
    Because he isn't black
    Because he's white

    Fine lines indeed. I am personally attracted to breaking barriers, and I can't see any issues had it been either Hillary or Barack, because both clearly have suitable qualities irrespective of anything else.
     
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