Is this typical American Behavour

Discussion in 'Relationships, Discrimination, and Jealousy' started by Island Club Guy CT, Jul 25, 2009.

  1. Island Club Guy CT

    Island Club Guy CT New Member

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    Was at local Casino in Cape Town last night playing Roullette and this American male joined me at the table. I was standing next to wheel and he asked me to move? At first i did not but he eventully he manouvred next to wheel. Than he started winning , he punched me in the back of happyness. The Next spin he picked me up for a few seconds. I was just putting on a brave face but i was scared hopping he would not win another spin. Is this typical behavour for African American Males or American males in general. Just need to know if i need to prepared myself for more of this for 2010 World Cup. Any LPSG members coming to World Cup next year?
     
  2. tray22nc

    tray22nc New Member

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    I'm not really sure if this is a typical behavior or not, but I can't say I blame him for doing so...he probably thought you were HOT! (Which you are, btw)
     
  3. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    Good lord no it isn't! That's so odd! In America when someone challenges your spot at the roulette table, you each draw your gun and shoot each other. Whomever is shot first has to withdraw. This is true unless, of course, the other man happens to have a McDonald's Happy Meal with him in which case you can accept it as a bribe. Then you both must each eat a few bites of the meal and part as good friends, but only for the rest of the night. This is why every American casino has a McDonald's in it and why Americans are so fat when they're not shot dead by each other.
     
  4. D_Gunther Snotpole

    D_Gunther Snotpole Account Disabled

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    Clear, crisp, comprehensive.
    A superb synopsis, Jason.
     
  5. B_Bonky

    B_Bonky New Member

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    You forgot the part about shopping at Wal mart together after the gun fight.
     
  6. cbrmale

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    I'm not going to the World Cup, but I can vouch that Americans are more outgoing than most of the rest of us, which is off-putting. When travelling, Americans would be well-advised to observe what's going on around them and try to blend-in more. In Europe, especially France, American tourists are loathed and detested for this reason, they just don't try to fit it. Instead they are brash, noisy and so on.

    For me, the best part of travel is immersing myself in the local culture. In France I am French, and tourists come to me and ask directions! In Spain I become Spanish, although my Spanish isn't as good as my French, while in the UK I become British. And so it goes on.
     
  7. rbkwp

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    Reports i hear these days from family and friends who have traveled the States recently... you have a Good name
    Friendly Courteous overall helpful etc etc
    I know with my OE quite a few younger US travelers were posing as Canadians...maybe still so...unfortunate ..early 70s
    I disliked Americans from th e 60s .. but not so now
    Then again i think we are all more inclined to treat visitors/tourists from other countries .. just a little differently than Locals?
    enz
     
  8. DiscoBoy

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    If he asked you to move, why didn't you? Is this typical South African behaviour?:rolleyes:
     
  9. B_VinylBoy

    B_VinylBoy New Member

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    Beautiful. Simply beautiful! Do you write for Bill Maher or something? :biggrin1:
     
  10. AG08

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    Maybe because "pardon" or "excuse me" is far more polite than "MOVE!". If someone said that to me, I wouldn't be too obliging either. :rolleyes:
     
  11. gretchenweiner

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    south dakota, it&#039;s pretty lame
    entering hell's gates...how i loathe the wal mart
     
  12. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    Yes, nothing like intolerance to improve relations! Of course I'm an American where ever I go. Why should I be anything else? I'll wear my sneakers and white socks and bathe and use deodorant and be friendly. New York has been inundated by French tourists this summer and they slink around desperately hoping nobody recognizes them as French. They look like terrified rabbits. And you know what? They don't look the least bit American either. Nor do any of the other Europeans and nobody cares so long as they don't start learning American coinage while standing at the Starbucks register. The only people who are hard to spot are Canadians and sometimes the Kiwis and you Aussies (though you lot generally look comparatively disheveled, overly tan, and appear to have a fondness for primitive jewelry). Much of the time it's the shoes that give it away.

    I'll never forget going to France and marveling at some little girl wearing a hot pink T-shirt with a picture of a squiggly line of cocaine on it with the title, "Dust of paradise," in English. I tried to inform the girl's mother that her daughter's shirt proclaimed her to be a coke whore but to no avail.

    I'm not saying don't respect local customs or cultures, but the holier-than-thou attitude that Europeans direct toward American culture in general, is tiresome and rude. One thing I did love was meeting Italian tourists in the rest of Europe. The disdain for everything not Italian they encountered that just sweated from them deliciously pleased me no end. They were sneering in the Louvre, in Chartres, in Dresden, in Prague, and the National Gallery. I loved that they dressed better than everyone else and clearly weren't impressed by anything they saw because, quite rightly, their cultural treasures back home are second to none.

    Oddly enough, the Italians come to New York and they don't sneer at everything. Maybe then do in the museums, but I haven't noticed. They certainly do at the Italian restaurants (I've never caught an Italian tourist in an Italian restaurant, just making comments as they walk by or they look at the menu and snigger). I think it's because Europe doesn't have a city like New York. There's some respect there and I appreciate that.
     
    #12 jason_els, Jul 26, 2009
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2009
  13. DiscoBoy

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    We don't know that he said "MOVE!" and judging from the person's friendly behaviour (well, I see back slapping and person-lifting as friendly behaviour), I doubt that's how he asked for the OP to move.
     
  14. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    Ah yes, words of wisdom from the country that gave the world such dignified people of quiet reserve who blend-in, like Steve "Crikey!" Irwin, Paul "Crocodile Dundee" Hogan, Germaine "Every act of sex is rape" Greer, Russell "fuck you!" Crowe, and Yahoo Serious.

    The French don't like anybody. It's not just Americans. You'd hate everybody too if they found invading your country so damned easy.
     
  15. cbrmale

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    What a diatribe of hatred! As an example I have been to France several times and I find them charming, and as I said they often mistake me for being French (well-groomed, dressed nicely). When they learn I'm Australian, they're still just as polite. I see American tourists there, loud and brash, dressed like something the cat dragged in, filling tiny cafes with overweight bodies and luggage all over the floor, and you wonder why they aren't much liked? France is but an example, I've seen the same in Italy, Spain, Holland, Germany etc etc.

    When one travels one has to learn respect. In the South African example, little respect was shown. In my travels, I often see Americans not showing respect. My respect is to observe what's happening, and to change the way I behave so as to not intrude. In Europe, the style is polite but not overly-friendly. Friendliness comes at a later stage in a relationship ('tu' rather than 'vous'). The South African style (I've been there and to Zimbabwe), is also polite rather than friendly.

    The other thing I do when I travel is keep away from the hotels and rent apartments. Then you can go downstairs and buy fresh food from the shops and markets and really immerse yourself in life. If you speak the local language it's easier, but even if you don't but are polite, someone will help you out.
     
  16. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    And I wrote, "a diatribe of hatred??" Look in the mirror.

    Insulting Americans so freely it's no wonder the French mistake you for one of them.

    The Americans and the French have been insulting each other for ages. It's sibling rivalry in many ways. Don't read too much genuine hatred into it.

    I've been to France and enjoyed it. South of Lyon the French tend to become much nicer than their northern cousins. Those within the influence of metro Paris are a different story. I think their reputation for rudeness is deserved. Not everyone is, but many are and it's not just toward Americans though I think we get the brunt of it.
     
  17. Wish-4-8

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    No, Walmart was before the casino. That is where they buy their clothes.
     
  18. vince

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    Jason, I've been to Paris about a dozen times in the past eight years. I also go to Cannes every September. I speak about two words of French and I can honestly say that I've not had any rudeness directed towards me whatsoever. I guess if I went looking for it, I'd find it, just like I do in Germany. But then I don't like Germany much.

    I haven't noticed any stinky French. I'm sure they exist, but I think that stereotype is a relic of another time.

    I too tend to blend in and stay out of the radar. But if some tourists want to stick out like sore thumbs, that's their business and other people, especially other tourists should just shut-up. Are you there to see the sights or are you're there to critique other tourists? Not everyone has to be the same as you.
     
  19. piratebulldog

    piratebulldog Member

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    How odd that throughout your travels you keep encountering Americans who are acting rudely. This has not been my experience at all. Because we are a far more diverse culture than most other countries in the world, we have a tolerance for other cultures and an acceptance that it seems other cultures lack. I agree with jason_els and while I am not nearly as funny and well spoken as he is, I would remind our friend from Australia that he was not spreading a gospel of hate but rather putting things in a different light and perpective. Don't come to the US if you are so disgusted by us.
     
  20. MarkLondon

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    Parisiennes? Even the French hate them, lol!

    My French sister-in-law's Parissienne 85 yr old mother visits her in her quiet Breton village and stonks around the deserted streets of an evening contemptuously declaring "This is dead city! Dead city!".
     
    #20 MarkLondon, Jul 26, 2009
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2009
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