Lost in all the Jackie Robinson festivities

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by faceking, Apr 15, 2007.

  1. faceking

    faceking Well-Known Member

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    A remarkable achievement, a remarkable life.

    Lest we forget there were many white (mostly wealth) men who hired him, put a bit on the line, and pushed through quite a few hurdles to get the man on the field in the first place. If it wasn't Jackie, it woulda been someone else. Not to discount it... like Neil Armstrong being the first man on the moon, so much is left behind the scenes of the folk (both black and white) who helped make it happen. But it's oft sacrilige for whitey to put himself on the back now and then....
     
  2. Lex

    Lex
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    HAHAHAHAHA.

    What a fucking joke you and your lot are.
     
  3. fortiesfun

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  4. GoneA

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    over it.
     
  5. JustAsking

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    You have fallen prey to the standard white supremecist fairy tale. After the civil war there were quite a few black baseball players playing in the professional leagues. Two brothers, Moses Fleetwood Walker and Welday Walker played in the majors as early as 1884.

    Right after the civil war, and up to about 1890, blacks enjoyed successful careers in business, athletics, and politics. Unfortunately, there was a big unsolved integration problem that basically killed the Reconstruction. The integration problem was not with blacks, but with Confederates. As the Southern white supremecists gained power, during the years between 1890 and 1920, politicians pandered to them in order to get elected and managed to institutionalize a new racism as an American way of life. White Americans, during that time, joined hands both economically and politically and managed to put African Americans back into second class citizen status.

    However, the white electorate had become so racist by 1892 that Grover Cleveland won the White House partly by tarring the Republicans with their attempts to guarantee civl rights to African Americans. During the campaign, they conjured the fear of "Negro domination" in the Northern as well as the Southern mind.

    From the Civil War to the end of the century, not a single Democrat in Congress both in the North and the South ever voted in favor of civil rights legislation. What is worse is that the Supreme Court with its segregationist decisions from 1896 through 1927 told the nation that whites were the master race.

    Later, Woodrow Wilson won the Presidency in 1912 and proceeded to completely segregate the federal government. Aided by the movie, The Birth of a Nation, which opened in 1915, the KKK rose to its zenith, boasting over a million members. The KKK dominated the gov't of Indiana for some time, and proudly inducted Pres. Warren G. Harding as a member in a White House ceremony.

    During the Wilson and Harding administrations, over one hundred race riots occured. White mobs killed African Americans all across the country. Mass attacks by whites wiped out or terrorized black communities threatening to leave or be killed. Entire towns became ghost towns in a single night.

    It is this time of our history that begins the "tangle of pathology" in African American society. Some place it even more recent in history, such as the great migration to Northern cities starting in 1918.

    This is something that is totally absent from our history books. Modern American racism towards blacks was not the result of slavery. It was the result of a deliberate effort by white supremecists (especially those in government) to control the hearts, minds, and politics of the American people around the turn of the century to turn back the tremendous progress the country had already made in integration. And they were successful.

    There is nothing to be proud of in all of this, faceboy. Your noble white sponsors of Jackie Robinson had to wait until 1947 to put enough distance between them and the white supremecists from the early part of the century.
     
  6. agnslz

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    What I think was truly lost in all the Jackie Robinson festivities is the fact that there is an ever-shrinking number of Black players in the Major Leagues. And especially that there is an equally dwindling number of Black kids interested in the sport anymore. It's an issue that's been discussed before, but I think they should've used this anniversary as a way of trying to get Blacks interested in the game of baseball once more. I think there was only one Black player on tonight's Dodgers roster that wasn't Hispanic. That is sad, I feel.
     
  7. Lex

    Lex
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    Is it just a coincidence that none of these right wing losers seem educated beyond the propaganda they are spoonfed? Sad.

    Thanks for clearing things up for us, JA.
     
  8. DGirl

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    Lex, SIR I back you on that..
     
  9. BobLeeSwagger

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    Actually it hasn't been lost. Quite a few in the media have pointed it out and considered the possible causes of it.
     
  10. rob_just_rob

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    I've heard of this phenomenon. Apparently at one point in the 70s, 40-some percent of MLBs players were black, and now it's down in the 20% range.

    I'm not sure why this is a problem, though, and everyone who says it is a problem seems to have some fairly unsavory explanations when pressed.
     
  11. Lex

    Lex
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    Baseball-- moreso that football or basketball requires a ton of space and equipment in order to play. There are not many baseball diamonds in the inner city parks that I have visited. Moreover, you need a glove for every player, a bat and ball and around 14 people to have a decent game.

    Football and basketball, in the other hand, require only a single ball. For Football, you need only one other person (to throw the ball) and for basketball, you don't need anyone else to practice dribbling, shooting, etc.
     
  12. rob_just_rob

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    Quite so - that's the explanation for the decline, and it makes sense. Same reason why soccer is so popular in the developing world.

    What I don't understand is why it's perceived to be a bad thing that fewer black athletes are playing baseball. Of course the lack of means to play is a bad thing, but fewer blacks in baseball is a symptom of the problem, not the problem itself. Why is it important to the predominantly white sports media to try to tell black athletes what sport they should be playing? :confused:
     
  13. rob_just_rob

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    I guess it's funny to me that a fuss is being made about fewer black athletes playing the sport, but there doesn't seem to be the same fuss about the (relative) lack of black (or latino) executives or owners.
     
  14. agnslz

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    Oh, I know it's been reported on, that's why I said it's been mentioned before. I saw a short piece about it on MSNBC yeterday, and read an equally short article about it in my local newspaper on Friday. I guess what I wanted was ads, either in print or on television, by Major League Baseball, that would've used the anniversary as a way to remind Blacks of the important role and history they've had in shaping the game of baseball. Ones which would've hopefully (or, at least tried to), use the anniversary and commemoration of Jackie Robinson's achievement as a way to spark the interest of Blacks in baseball once more.

    To be fair, Major League Baseball is doing some things to try and curb this problem, but I think they missed a great oppurtunity for more outreach with this commemoration.

    I suppose it's only truly a problem to those of us interested in the game, who lament that it is occurring. I don't know exactly what you're getting at with your "unsavory explanations" comment, though I can guess what it is.

    BTW, I think the actual percentage of Black players is now around eight percent, which is about five percent less than the total percentage of Blacks in the United Sates.

    I don't think anyone is trying to tell Blacks what sports to be interested in, but I do think many who are concerned about it are trying to get them interested in the sport once more. I think it's a bad thing because of the history that Blacks have had in baseball. They helped to shape it (a lot) and now I fear that that influence is fading away. I don't know, I'm hardly a member of the "predominantly White sports media," I'm just a Hispanic gay guy who enjoys watching baseball and is interested in the history of it, and its future. A future that I hope will continue to be shaped by many Black players.

    Oh, a "fuss" has been made about that issue many times over the years too. I think it's all part of the same problem, since most of the Blacks today that are part of the higher echelon of Major League Baseball are former players.
     
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