Mars -- Our blushing neighbour

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Imported, Aug 11, 2003.

  1. Imported

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    56,713
    Likes Received:
    55
    Javierdude22: Hey guys, just quickly:

    If you like that sorta thing, or your out to have a nice romantic evening, go to the roof of your building or somewhere in the fields and chill, cause theres gonna be a buncha falling stars out there tonight and upto the 13th of August.

    I saw the Bootids on my fifteenth birthday, and was totally amazed. Even bought a telescope after that (nerdalert)...

    Just thought id let you know, hope the full moon doesnt spoil it...
     
  2. Imported

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    56,713
    Likes Received:
    55
    awellhungboi: Awesome! I heard the moon shouldn't block it out too much. When is the best time to try to view the show?

    (Everybody should take a good gander at Mars too, while they're out)
     
  3. Imported

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    56,713
    Likes Received:
    55
    Longhornjok: [quote author=Monstro link=board=99;num=1060639332;start=0#1 date=08/11/03 at 15:49:13]When is the best time to try to view the show?[/quote]
    According to a site I checked out, the best show in the U.S. will be the evening of Tuesday, August 12. If my math was right, optimal viewing times are 10:30pm (for you East Coasters, Monstro), 9:30CST, 8:30MST, and 7:30PST (which sucks, since that's like still dusk for us out west).

    Also, here's a chart to help ya spot the li'l suckers: comets.amsmeteors.org/meteors/showers/perseidobs.html
     
  4. Imported

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    56,713
    Likes Received:
    55
    7x6andchg: 9:30 eh?  I've seen the Perseid meteor shower before...not to be missed if you can see it (weather/moon, etc.)...

    Here in the North Central part of the US it should be clear...which means the moon might be a problem...it's waning gibbous.

    Another thing not to miss - if you're ever north or south of 43 degrees N or S - is Aurora Borealis or Australis....

    7x6&C
     
  5. Imported

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    56,713
    Likes Received:
    55
    Longhornjok: [quote author=7by6etC link=board=99;num=1060639332;start=0#3 date=08/11/03 at 20:06:15]Here in the North Central part of the US it should be clear...which means the moon might be a problem...it's waning gibbous.[/quote]
    Oh cool, so now I know what Aimee Mann means when she sings "12th of June, a gibbous moon, was this the longest day?" Well, I kinda know. :D
     
  6. Imported

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    56,713
    Likes Received:
    55
    gigantikok: damn clouds... damn lights...

    I don't think I'm going to be able to see anything. :(
     
  7. Imported

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    56,713
    Likes Received:
    55
    7x6andchg: [astronomy geek]

    gibbous is when the moon is more than quarter (aka half) full but not yet full...or just full and no longer full.

    Waxing = getting closer to full from quarter
    waning = moving away from full to quarter then new

    FYI

    [/astronomy geek] :D

    7x6&C
     
  8. Imported

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    56,713
    Likes Received:
    55
    SpeedoGuy: Several years ago I watched the annual perseids show after doing a night hike to the top of Mt. Lassen, a 10,500 foot dormant volcano in northern California. Quite a light show to observe the perseids from high altitude.

    SG
     
  9. Imported

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    56,713
    Likes Received:
    55
    awellhungboi: You guys are getting me psyched. I'll have to remember to tear myself away from my computer at 10:30 tomorrow. But I have to worry about lights and clouds too.

    And I'd love to see something like that from a high altitude, Speedo. Sounds amazing.
     
  10. Imported

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    56,713
    Likes Received:
    55
    Javierdude22: Speedoguy that sounds awesome man. I haven't seen the Perseids in full glory yet, thats why i'm anxious to see them now as they are known to be the best.

    In 1999 it was at the height, cause apparently they have a 33 year cycle. I saw a picture of the rain in 1933 and it looked amazing.

    It's set. Next year, i'm goin to the Alps ;D
     
  11. Imported

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    56,713
    Likes Received:
    55
    Javierdude22: Yeah, brought this one back...it's a hobby ;)

    But anways, so theres another once in a lifetime opportunity this year, and especially these following nights. Mars is at its closest point to the earth in 60,000 years!!!

    This means its gonna be really visible, and if you have a reasonably decent telescope you can actually see its polar ice cap.

    So check out that bright red blushing dot in the sky. Your kids might inhabit it someday  ;D .
     
  12. Imported

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    56,713
    Likes Received:
    55
    SimplyHung: [quote author=Javierdude23 link=board=99;num=1060639332;start=0#10 date=08/27/03 at 13:30:21] Your kids might inhabit it someday ;D .[/quote]

    They've actually estimated that, sometime after the year 2014 (but not terribly long after, within the lifetime of most of the people here), that it will be possible for people to visit Mars for extended periods of time.
     
  13. Imported

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    56,713
    Likes Received:
    55
    awellhungboi: [quote author=Javierdude23 link=board=99;num=1060639332;start=0#10 date=08/27/03 at 13:30:21]Yeah, brought this one back...it's a hobby ;)
    So check out that bright red blushing dot in the sky. Your kids might inhabit it someday  ;D .
    [/quote]

    That's a beautiful sentiment, Javier, and right now it looks like the ESA will be the ones to get us there. Here in the states the future of NASA is up in the air (unlike its space fleet).
     
  14. Imported

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    56,713
    Likes Received:
    55
    Javierdude22: [quote author=Monstro link=board=99;num=1060639332;start=0#12 date=08/27/03 at 20:48:15]
    right now it looks like the ESA will be the ones to get us there.  Here in the states the future of NASA is up in the air (unlike its space fleet).  
    [/quote]

    You're kidding me man, really? What are the talks about then? Stopping certain programs?
     
  15. Imported

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    56,713
    Likes Received:
    55
    awellhungboi: Well, from what I understand, from the recent damning report on the Columbia tragedy, that board recommended that the U.S. government needs to shit or get off the pot, pardon the expression. It said (more or less) that we need to either make a sustained committment to space exploration, with a long-term goal, and the resources to back up this goal, or we need to just shut the thing down. Although Bush has said that 'space exploration will go on' with record deficits I don't see how that will happen. America either needs to spend the money to ensure it has the safest, most efficient space program in the world, or it needs to decide 'well, maybe we should spend this money on updating our power grid, funding education, health care, etc.' Sad that the richest country in the world, one that only a few years ago had such a surplus, has to make such bargain basement decisions. (And this isn't a partisan rant--both Dems and Reps. share equal blame over the decay of what was once the jewel in America's crown: its Rocket men and women.)
     
  16. Imported

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    56,713
    Likes Received:
    55
    sudas: I saw Mars last night, even through some overcast. It is brighter than Venus (usually the third brightest object after Sun and Moon).

    They asked on the news, is it significant that it is closer than it's ever been in 60,000 years or just a hype? The answer is hype. Now that we have the Hubble Telescope and have sent probes to Mars it's closeness doesn't mean as much.

    Unfortunately the astronomer in the interview didn't talk about a closest approach that is significant. In 1989 Pluto made its closest approach to the sun. It will be hundreds of years before it returns to that point in its orbit. No probe has been sent there, and the Pluto-Charon system can hardly be resolved by the Hubble.

    Originally, Voyager 1 was considered to go to Pluto. Instead it was decided to send it near Saturn's moon Titan and head over the pole of Saturn. This was partly due to the idea that the probe might not last until Pluto. The Titan flyby was a bust because the atmosphere of Titan was too thick.

    Since then, missions have been suggested, but then they've been cancelled. If we don't launch a mission to Pluto in the next couple of years, one scientific opportunity will be lost. Pluto is considered a Kuiper Belt Object, like a comet. A slight atmosphere has been detected. In a decade or so, it is expected to freeze or snow out. If we don't get a probe there soon, we've lost the chance to study it for centuries.

    The current mission is called New Horizons, and if we are lucky it will launch in 2006. If you favor planetary exploration, you may want to ask your congressman to support funding this project.http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/
    [​IMG]
     
Draft saved Draft deleted