Medical school graduates

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Wyldgusechaz, Jun 17, 2008.

  1. Wyldgusechaz

    Wyldgusechaz New Member

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    I just atteneded a East Coast Med school graduation and it was very interesting in terms of demographic make up, 200 grads

    The most common last name was Patel, by a long shot. I think there were 15 Patels. About half the class was female and certainly well over half the class was of Indian or Eastern Asian (read Chinese, Vietnamse, Korean). There were 7 black grads and maybe 30% of the class was Caucasian.

    What I found interesting was a Wall Street Journal article a couple months ago that ranked the top stock analysts for companies like Goldman Sachs and Credit Suisse. Virtually all the analysts were Caucasian men. (Balding too LOL, for the most part)

    I think a lot of people no longer see medicine as a way to high income. Spending 10-12 years in education just to be at the mercy of managed care has taken the shine off of what was once seen as a way to wealth, IMO. I do think that immigrants and certain ethnic groups still see medicine as a noble profession, but as a money maker it just isn't as attractive anymore. Get an MBA and go to work as a money mover seems to be the new desirable profession?
     
  2. TurkeyWithaSunburn

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    I think it has more to do with fact that immigrants see doctors as useful members of society, and it's a profession that can be used ANYWHERE in the world.

    An MBA won't help you if you're out in the boonies of a 3rd world country.
     
  3. Steve26

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    Anyone smart enough to get through medical school is smart enough to do very well in any number of other fields. If more undergraduates realized this, there'd be a lot fewer people applying for the privilege of spending their 20s sequestered away in teaching hospitals.

    I once aspired to be a physician, but am SO glad now that I didn't go that route. All the life I've lived since college would have been lost to a lot of classroom time. And the last thing I'd want is a bunch of "pre-med major"-types as my professional colleagues, workdays full of harried 10-minute appointments with patients, and the HMOs' bean-counters breathing down my neck.

    Noble? Definitely. The career for me? In retrospect, definitely not.

    Steve
     
  4. OCMuscleJock

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    With the cost of health care these days and what insurance companies are willing to actually pay physicians for thier services, compaired to the high cost of the procedures, people are opting out of the MD degree and many are going PA or even toward Holistic Medicine. I watched a couple shows and one said some of the highest paying professions now are what are considered blue collar jobs. IE: Electricians, Landscapers and etc. The other show I saw said that with current costs of most colleges many Americans cannot afford to go to college anymore and also that many of the students form foreign countries aren't as eager to come to the US anymore due to the current government situation and also due to how the US is viewed abroad. More and more people are traveling out of the country to get surgeries performed, because they are cheaper and some insurance companies are actually paying for this.
     
  5. Mem

    Mem
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    I think people who are leery of getting into the medical profession are worried about Universal health care and what it may mean to their earning potential. If they want to make money they need to become a surgeon or a plastic surgeon.
     
  6. DC_DEEP

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    A good very close friend of mine is finishing up his 3rd year of medical school. His last name is Indian, but not Patel. His parents moved from New Delhi to Long Island in their early adulthood, and all three of their children were born there. Mom is an oncologist, dad had his Ph. D. in engineering. Two of the three children are going into medicine, and one is a certified financial planner.

    My friend isn't going into it "for the money," but he's certainly hoping to pay off the loans, then make a comfortable living in sports medicine.
     
  7. lucky8

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    That's what I'm going to school for, MBA in finance double minor in entrepreneurship and international busniess, 1 year till freedom baby! Money management is where it's at in the next 50 years. I know what you're saying though, just about every finance major at my university is caucasian, and just about every medical major is either middle eastern or asian.
     
  8. exwhyzee

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    I dated someone who graduated from Med School last May. Of his little clique, all were white and evenly split male/female. The most popular specialization was anesthesiology...because it was the easiest work (gassing someone at the beginning and ending of each operation). An attendee would monitor the process once it was started. Good pay for relatively little work, as far as they were concerned. I think it was also easily transferable if they wanted to move later in life. Other areas included optometry and peds. None of them were entering into general medicine, the insurance was too high and they didn't want to deal with the "crazy people" that needed constant attention. Their favorite activity after work was to gather over beers and trade stories about the "crazy people" and how they crazy their day was.

    It seems insurance, mobility, tuition, and the current state of national health care all contribute to a decline in interest in the field.
     
  9. Rikter8

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    Is that why Medical Malpractice deaths outnumber deaths by firearms?

    It's still who you know, or how much you suck up to your instructors that gets you through. Essays are the way of cheating the system as it's all subjective.
     
  10. Meniscus

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    My last physician recently gave up general medicine/family practice to become a hospitalist. This is the 3rd doctors I've been through in 7 years. I asked him if he could recommend any other physicians in the area, because I don't much like the medical center I've been going too. It's hard to get an appointment, and there are long waits. With him gone and no replacement hired, I expect it to get worse.

    He told me that doctors were leaving the area. I asked why, since I think it's such a nice area to live. He agreed with me, but said that they can't pay enough to attract doctors here since they can make $20,000 more a year in Connecticut or New York. He ultimately blamed the insurance companies for getting in the way of the people who knew what they were doing. I've also heard that doctors in the area have patient loads twice what they ought to.

    And yet...why do my routine exams cost anywhere from $89 to $150? Why did my 5 minute ER visit a couple of months ago cost $465? (I called the billing office to make sure it wasn't an error, and the woman I spoke with told me that I was lucky; most ER visits cost much more.) I just can't believe that it costs that much to keep a medical practice running. Somebody is getting rich, and I'm not sure it's the insurance companies.

    I wear orthotics. I got my first pair in grad school. They cost $50. My second pair, with thicker padding, cost $80. When they needed to be replaced, I went to a podiatrist. He charged $375. Curious as to why they cost so much more, I made some calls to podiatrists, physical therapists, the health center at my grad school, and orthotics manufacturers. I found out that the orthotics I purchased in grad school were sold to me at cost. That means that podiatrists are marking them up something like 400-500%. Insurance companies won't pay for them, but why should they? Why should podiatrists make a huge profit on the orthotics they sell when they've already being paid for the evaluation, fitting, and whatever other services they provide? Podiatrists are lining their pockets with money that many of their patients can't afford to pay, just because they can; they have little or no competition and they know their patients need the devices. That's called taking advantage of someone and it's grossly unethical. I used podiatrists and an example, but I'm not sure other doctors are much better. I also need a night guard because I clench and grind my teeth in my sleep. My current dentist charges $400. Some go as high as $600. I suspect the manufacturer charges the dentist much less. Why should dentists make a profit off the sale of this sort of thing when they've already been paid for their services?
     
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