Megan's Law killer to be spared death in NJ

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Mem, Dec 13, 2007.

  1. Mem

    Mem
    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2006
    Messages:
    8,087
    Likes Received:
    8
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    FL
    We only have 8 people on death row. We have not put anyone to death for 31 years and now they want to repeal the death penalty.

    I think it should be used when there is no shadow of a doubt of a person's guilt.

    Especially for the guy who raped and killed a 7 year old girl.
     
  2. Principessa

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2006
    Messages:
    19,494
    Likes Received:
    28
    Gender:
    Female
    I agree. It costs society and decent citizens too much to give these dregs of society life without parole; which I understand is the option.
     
  3. MASSIVEPKGO_CHUCK

    MASSIVEPKGO_CHUCK Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2003
    Messages:
    28,016
    Likes Received:
    727
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    the pain behind your eyes
    Unfortunately, you still have to convince the courts and the victim's family somewhere down the way, because, like it or not, they won't be placated with seeing a sorry excuse of a human being living for destroying a life.
     
  4. Principessa

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2006
    Messages:
    19,494
    Likes Received:
    28
    Gender:
    Female

    How about a grandfather clause? :cool: Everyone currently on death row gets to make one more appeal between now and January 30th. After that everyone currently on death row dies; and no one else gets the death penalty. :biggrin1:
     
  5. cocktaste

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2007
    Messages:
    1,414
    Likes Received:
    13
    I think we need another Australia for the criminals, and for the murderers, electroshock time!
     
  6. Not_Punny

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Messages:
    5,542
    Albums:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1,204
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    California
    I disagree with the death penalty. I just wonder what happened to hard labor?
     
  7. JC8

    JC8 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2007
    Messages:
    594
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    17
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Not Iowa, that's for sure. (Iowa)
    Sending someone to their death is such a cavalier thing? Given the inherent inequities in the current legal system, I think not.

    But then again, my perspective is one of distrust of the system, rather than the indoctrinated "Well, the police wouldn't bother with them if there wasn't a reason" so many of the sheep-class/bourgeoisie seem to adopt.
     
  8. Principessa

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2006
    Messages:
    19,494
    Likes Received:
    28
    Gender:
    Female
    ROTFLMAO :biggrin1: The only people who do hard labor in America are the illegal aliens. I'm not talking about just Mexicans either. There are a huge number of illegal aliens from eastern Europe in the northeast and mid-atlantic states. :cool:
     
  9. Northland

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Messages:
    6,082
    Likes Received:
    4
    Well, since the State Assembley has pushed this through and it is fairly certain that Gov. Jon Corzine will sign it into law, you could start looking at the other sides.

    There are thousands upon thousands of wrongrul convictions annually- a death penalty destroys the chances of the person ever winning freedom again. Even persons who confess, are often revealed years later to have been forced into confession- hours and hours of interrogation in less than ideal quarters forces many to confess. Some confess to avoid beating, some to gain food, some to obtain bathrooom privaleges- all are forced. Many confessions are coaxed out of young detainees who have never had any legal interaction and don't understand the serious nature of the situation they are in. Many younger detainees are told that they will never again see family or friends- unless they confess. Detectives go over the details of the crime again and again, and tell the detainee that it is known that they did these things. Finally the person confesses. In many cases evidence turns up later showing that they did not commit the crime for which they were charged and convicted.

    And when it comes to those who actually did commit the crime, a life in prison without parole can be far less merciful than a lethal injection. If a person has any remorse- and many do- they will be forced to remember daily what they did. Neither will they ever have the ability to again walk the streets.


    Keep in mind that under the current structure, a sentence to death (death penalty) brings with it years and years of appeals. These appeals cost you and me- the taxpayers- millions of dollars. Studies show that it costs more to send a person to their death (death penalty) due to endless appeals than it does to keep them incarcerated for 60 years.


    And now to the news about this momentous event-

    Dec. 14 (Bloomberg) -- New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine said he plans to sign legislation repealing the state's death penalty within days.
    Corzine said the bill, passed by the Legislature this week, would end uncertainty in a state where no inmate has been executed since 1963. The signing hasn't been scheduled, said his spokeswoman Lilo Stainton.
    ``It's going to be two or three days, not months,'' Corzine, a Democrat, told reporters at the state capitol in Trenton yesterday. ``We would be better served as a society if we have clear and certain outcome for an individual who has carried out a heinous crime.''
    The measure would make New Jersey the first U.S. state to revoke the death penalty. The repeal of a law that has stood for a quarter of a century may serve as a catalyst for other states to end capital punishment, opponents of executions said.
    ``We are walking away from a policy that has failed us for 25 years,'' said Celeste Fitzgerald, director of New Jerseyans for Alternatives to the Death Penalty. ``This was a wonderful vote of conscience.''
    The legislation to replace the state's death penalty with a sentence of life in prison without parole passed the 80-member Assembly yesterday on a 44-36 vote. Earlier this week, the 40- member Senate gave its approval, 21-16.
    Executions have been virtually halted in the U.S. as the Supreme Court considers whether death by lethal injection violates a constitutional prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment.
    Moratorium
    Thirty-seven states, the federal government and the military have the death penalty. New Jersey, which has had a moratorium on executions since 2005, would be the first state since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the sanction in 1976 to repeal an existing statute through legislative act.
    Among the 13 states without capital punishment, some have statutes that courts overturned, others abolished it before the Supreme Court's 1976 ruling, and others never approved a death penalty law, supporters of the bill said.
    Assemblyman Wilfredo Caraballo, a Democrat from Newark who sponsored the legislation, said he wants to see other states follow New Jersey's example in striking down the penalty.
    ``I know there is a sentiment for this across the country,'' said Caraballo, a Seton Hall University Law Professor who is leaving office in January. ``Many don't want to be the first to do it, and I hope this gives them strength.''
    Derek Roseman, a spokesman for Caraballo, said the measure may spare the eight men now on the state's death row. The legislation stipulates the inmates would have 60 days after enactment to decide whether they want to accept their death sentence or change it to life without parole, he said.
    The federal court ruled in 1972 that the death penalty violated the Constitution's Eighth Amendment, prohibiting cruel and unusual punishment, because its application could be arbitrary. In 1976, the court ruled the states had satisfied its concerns, clearing the way for its return. New Jersey, which had outlawed capital punishment in 1972, reinstated it in 1982.
    To contact the reporter on this story: Terrence Dopp in Trenton, New Jersey at _____________ (do a google search or visit Bllomberg.com for more info on this article)
     
  10. craig_uk

    craig_uk Member

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2006
    Messages:
    210
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    10
    Gender:
    Male
    "thousands upon thousands of wrongrul convictions annually" - you got a source for that one? or you just make it up?

    You might find there are a number of unsafe convictions but that does not mean they didn't do the crime - normally that they were convicted on evidence that was wrongly weighted or interpreted by the judge. In the US, UK and Australia etc. we are only supposed to convict when a case is proved 'beyond resaonable doubt' or a similar high standard is required - it is unsafe if the apppeal courst don't think this was acheived.

    Now - "thousands upon thousands" - just how many is that exactly???
     
  11. Dave NoCal

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2006
    Messages:
    1,994
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    250
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Sacramento (CA, US)
    How many wrongful executions, by a nation that is supposed to run on higher principles, is acceptable?
    Dave
     
  12. SteveHd

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2006
    Messages:
    3,849
    Likes Received:
    6
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Daytona
    I don't object to the law revoking the dealt penalty but I do object to commuting the existing sentences to "life". The juries and judges in those cases made a verdict and gave a sentence. Their judgement should be honored. I'd rather the new law apply to future crimes.

    I realize that's threading a needle but that's how I feel.
     
  13. Pecker

    Pecker Retired Moderator
    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2002
    Messages:
    83,922
    Likes Received:
    34
    I am an advocate of capital punishment, however, I would gladly defer to sentencing murderers to life without the possibility of parole if they truly never see the outside of a prison again.
     
  14. Principessa

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2006
    Messages:
    19,494
    Likes Received:
    28
    Gender:
    Female
    I agree, anyone currently on death row should die. :cool:


     
Draft saved Draft deleted