Modern Ghost Towns?

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by mephistopheles, Jun 3, 2011.

  1. mephistopheles

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    I live in SW Missouri and there are a lot of mines, mining towns and stuff like that (here and in NE Oklahoma) and there are actually a fair amount of ghost towns because of it.

    Most of the people had to leave these entire towns because the ground was shifting (due to the mining that had been taking place there for decades)

    There had even been additions recently.

    They are modern but completely empty towns, all that you can do is drive through.

    Anyone else have some of these around?

    These places would be perfect to film Zombie flicks.
     
  2. workandplay243

    workandplay243 New Member

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    Pretty cool, I went to the 'Whaley House' in old town San Diego last week, it's supposed to be the most haunted place in the U.S. Kind of a fun, historic tour.

    I think I saw some curtains moving by themselves, too. Who knows.

    I once played a game of poker in the old hotel 'Wild Bill' was shot in the back in Deadwood, South Dakota. I kept looking over my shoulder every time I won a hand.
     
  3. Daisy

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    Downtown Marysville, CA. Would make a good Twilight Zone set.
     
  4. D_Rufus_D_Dufus

    D_Rufus_D_Dufus Account Disabled

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    Also, a couple of nights a year ( usually around Halloween) they let you in with all the lights turned off and give you a flashlight.. it's seriously the creepiest ever.
     
  5. workandplay243

    workandplay243 New Member

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    Yea, I took some pics with my phone camera, and I'm a little hesitant to load them on my computer to look at them. It was pretty creepy in that old morgue/hangmans area/suicide spot. I had a weird uneasy feeling, and that was at 6:30, still light outside. Forget the flashlight tour, no thanks!
     
  6. insert_8

    insert_8 New Member

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    I think mining districts are especially famous for creating ghost towns. In the U.S., the "town" around a mine site was usually owned by the mining company itself, and if they decided to curtail operations they simply evicted the occupants - leaving buildings and facilities ready to be re-occupied if business conditions ever again made it profitable to operate the mine.

    In the early 1970's I lived in the "Copper Country" in the State of Superior. Copper mining in that district began in the 1840's (before the California Gold Rush), and "lake copper" was a major raw material that contributed to electrifying most of North America - but major closures started around the time of WW1 (see "Nineteen Thirteen Massacre"), and the final round in the early 1960's left only one producing mine out of hundreds.

    I think they have all been knocked down now, but when I was there in the 1970's there were dozens of unpopulated, or nearly empty, ghost towns in the region. Some were at mine sites, but many were at mill locations, sawmills, or railroad junctions. I found it interesting to look at the ruins - some with relatively intact structures, others with only the outlines of where foundations had been - and try to imagine the activities, work-flow, etc that had happened there. The ghost town at Senter was especially interesting because the community was devoted to manufacturing dynamite and explosives . . . but was one of the few locations from that industry which had NOT ended its commercial life by burning to the ground.

    I worked for a local radio station. The transmitter site was near the ghost town of Pewabic. (In the winter I usually parked on the county road that ran past Pewabic, and snowshoed the last half mile of unplowed access road to the transmitter - often dragging tools or equipment on a toboggan.) Pewabic had some 3 or 4 dozen buildings in various stages of deterioration. I never made any effort to make contact, but one very old man lived in one of the houses. It had curtains, and I'd occasionally see him in the adjacent garden during the summer. I don't know if the house had working electricity or not - at night there was often a candle or kerosene lamp in a window. The station manager thought this old guy was the mining company's official "caretaker" of the town. A block or so from him, farthest from the road, lived a family. They seemed to be a man and woman in their mid to late 20's, and 2 or 3 young kids. They had an older car, and were by all appearances living close to a subsistence lifestyle. They may have been poor squatters, or perhaps had consciously chosen to be part of the hippie back-to-mother-earth movement that was somewhat visible in that era.

    I probably should have made an effort to introduce myself to those "ghosts" in that town. On one occasion I had to make an emergency trip to the transmitter, at night, in a blizzard. I missed a turn in the white-out and put the car in a ditch more than half a mile from where I should have been. The car wasn't totally off the road, and I didn't want to be sleeping in it when the snowplow came by. I decided to walk to the transmitter site - besides, I knew that the electronic equipment inside the transmitter building would warm it up to almost 40 degrees, if I kept it turned on all night. But I was navigating by dead-reckoning, hoping that if I got too far off course I'd run into landmarks I recognized - like Pewabic. For the 45 minutes or so it took me to cover that mile, I wondered whether either of those "ghosts" would take me in, should I appear at their door . . . in a blizzard . . . at midnight. Or would they decide that * * I * * was the ghost, and immortalize me in some kind of legend or folk tale about "Creatures of the Arctic Winds", or some such.

    (In fact, I DID find the transmitter site when I almost broke my neck by running into one of the antenna guy-wires. The snow on the floor of the transmitter building wasn't melting very fast, but it was easily 40 or 50 degrees warmer than outside. Thanks to friends, I DID get home that night, but not before I cracked a rib. And I never had a face-to-face meeting with the ghosts in Pewabic.)
     
  7. bigirishman

    bigirishman Well-Known Member

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    Anyone else find it irritating when people so full of their own importance decide to write essays in replies!
     
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